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Thread: How Britian works...

  1. #21

    OZZ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lant3rn View Post
    she is more of figure head here
    meaning that if she asked us to buy a boat, we would ask her kindly to go fuck herself
    + rep

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cullion View Post
    The Queen would not ask you to buy her a boat. 'The Crown' might. And you would not get a vote on it.
    Cullion, I've had this debate with you before. Your CROWN has NO authority over us whatsoever. What century do you live in?
    Explain this to me..what do you think the relationship between our two countries is ?

  3. #23

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    The Monarchy in Canada
    Feature by Jay Makarenko |

    Canada has a long monarchical tradition, beginning with the chief leadership of Aboriginal groups, the rule of French monarchs in New France, and British monarchs in Canada. This article presents Canada's monarchial traditions and institutions: it discusses the concept of monarchy, its history in Canada, its relationship with other governmental institutions, the profile of the current monarchy, as well as the debates and issues facing the monarchy in Canada.

    Historical overview of monarchies in Canada

    Canada has extensive historical ties to monarchy. Both the British and French monarchs have ruled over parts of what is known as Canada today. Even prior to European colonization of the region, Aboriginal groups formed quasi-monarchical forms of government. The following provides an overview of the history of British monarchy in Canada.

    British Monarchy in Canada
    Canada in the Making: Representative Government
    "Canadianizing" the Monarchy

    The British North America Act of 1867 established Canada as both an independent nation and a constitutional monarchy. However, the monarchy itself remained a strictly British institution. Since that time, however, reforms have been instituted which have "Canadianized" the monarchy in Canada.

    The first of these reforms was the passing of the Royal and Parliamentary Titles Act by the British Parliament. This Act replaced the concept of a single monarchy throughout the British Empire with multiple monarchies, held by the same person. Previously, the British King or Queen was the monarch of colonies such as Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, simply by virtue of being the monarch of the United Kingdom of Great Britain. With the passage of the Royal and Parliamentary Titles Act, however, the King or Queen was designated as the monarch of these countries, as separate monarchies and kingdoms. Canada thus continued to recognize a British King or Queen as its monarch. However, the country had gained its own royal office and title; the monarchy in Canada was no longer known as the King or Queen of the United Kingdom, but simply as the King or Queen of Canada.

    A second key reform came in 1931, when the British Parliament passed the Statute of Westminster, 1931. The Statute officially recognized the autonomy of all Commonwealth Nations, as well as gave all Commonwealth Realms, including Canada, legal powers over the monarchy in their own jurisdiction. (A Commonwealth Realm is any nation that recognizes the monarch in Britain as its Head of State.) As such, any changes to the rules of succession (the procedures by which a new monarch in Britain can be chosen) or royal styles and titles (the manner by which a monarch describes him/herself, or is described by others) require the consent of all Parliaments of the Commonwealth Realms. For example, if the Act of Settlement — which provides that only Protestants may become the monarch — were to be changed to allow Catholics to accede to the Throne, this would require Parliamentary approval by Canada and all other Commonwealth Realms.

    The convention regarding the altering of royal styles and titles was again amended in 1953 to allow each Commonwealth Realm to adopt its own practices, as suited to its particular monarchy.

    Canadian Government & the Monarchy

    How the monarchy works in Canadian government.

    Canada is a constitutional monarchy. In other words, the monarchy in Canada is recognized as the Head of State and centre of state authority. This role, however, is essentially symbolic; today, most real political power in Canada lies with elected politicians. The following provides an overview of the monarchy in contemporary Canadian government.
    The Monarchy & the Canadian Parliament

    The Canadian Parliament is one of the fundamental institutions in Canadian government, and is responsible for the development and enactment of federal laws. The Canadian Parliament is composed of three parts: the House of Commons, the Senate, and the Monarchy. In theory, for a law to come into effect, it must be approved by all three parts of Parliament.

    The House of Commons is the elected legislative body of Parliament. Members of the House of Commons (called Members of Parliament or MPs) are elected by Canadians to serve five-year terms, although these terms often end up being shorter. These elected representatives deliberate and pass government legislation. It is also important to note that the government of the day is represented by the political party with the greatest number of elected representatives in the House of Commons. The Prime Minister is the leader of the political party with the most elected representatives.

    The Senate is the non-elected legislative body of Parliament. Members of the Senate (called Senators) are not elected directly by Canadians, but appointed by the federal government. The Senate was designed to act as a counter-balance to the democratically elected House of Commons (as a body of “sober second thought”) and as an avenue of regional representation in Parliament. Each region of Canada is represented by a given number of Senators in the Red Chamber. In theory, no law can pass without approval by the Senate; however, in practice, the Senate very rarely exercises this power and generally approves all laws passed by the House of Commons.


    The third component of Parliament is the monarchy. Again, in theory, no law can be passed without approval by the monarchy (before a bill officially becomes law in Canada, it must be given Royal Assent). The monarchy also has the power to appoint the Prime Minister, and to summon and dissolve Parliament. In practice, however, the monarchy rarely exercises these powers independently. The monarch (or its representative in Canada, in the form of the Governor General) automatically gives Royal Assent to all legislation passed by the House of Commons. The actual decision to summon and dissolve Parliament is made by the Prime Minister. Its execution by the monarchy is almost always a formality.

    Ceremonial, nothing more.
    Britain does not own ' vast tracts of land ' over here..are you kidding me ?
    Or are you going to tell me how our government works ?
    Last edited by OZZ; 17th January 12 at 01:43 PM.

  4. #24

    OZZ's Avatar
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    That is only part of the article, but its all I need to prove my point.
    In theory mean just that, in theory.

    Aboriginal groups have more clout over here now than Britain does. That's just the way it is...

  5. #25
    Senior Member lant3rn's Avatar
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    thx for the civics lesson

  6. #26

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    I get incensed when Brits talk down to us.
    Especially limeys that are delusional and think its the 17th century.
    Let's see the receipts for the rent on these ' vast tracts of land ', Cullion.

  7. #27
    Registered Member KO'd N DOA's Avatar
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    Uh Ozz. Under the Indian Act, the indigenous population (for some reason now called aboriginals although not from Australia) are chattle for the Queen.

  8. #28
    Senior Member Vieux Normand's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OZZ View Post
    I get incensed when Brits talk down to us.
    You give a shit about this because........?

  9. #29
    Unintentional Rayp'ist Spade: The Real Snake's Avatar
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    She's the only thing keep you Canucklestanians from becoming States 51-60
    Quote Originally Posted by Feryk
    What Snake Said
    Quote Originally Posted by Lily
    Snake is also correct about EVERYTHING.

  10. #30


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    Quote Originally Posted by Vieux Normand View Post
    You give a shit about this because........?
    Colonial inferiority complex obviously.

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