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patfromlogan
10th October 02, 03:25 PM
Wanzi, it is called, a Buddist symble, of the sun, i think.

A local instructor of shorinji kempo and two of his balck belts, who happened to be black men ,all with the wanzi patch on their uniforms, walked into a local tournament. As they came in a clown at the table said, "What are you? Nazi karate guys?"

One of the brothers kept his cool, while the other exploded "Do I look like a Nazi?"
pat




Edited by - KC Elbows on October 10 2002 18:12:37

SifuAbel
10th October 02, 04:15 PM
Before hitler used and defamed this symbol, it was a sign used by many cultures, generally meaning the same thing. To the hindu and buddist is was a symbol of luck and strength. To the norsemen it was representative of the arctic sun and of thor's hammer. It was worn by both peoples soldiers as a charm of protection. It was actually a very positive symbol before hitler. It was used on sheilds of christians during the crusades and adopted by some christian sects as the "bent cross" denoting the many fold paths.

Hitler, in an effort to return germany to its nordic religious roots and in order to usurp christianity, adopted the swastica as its call to power.

McDojo, is it what you do or is it what you think?

DJ Coldfusion
10th October 02, 05:53 PM
The swastica, as perverted as it is, was originally meant to denote "brotherhood", "unity", "solidarity".

It represents four men standing across from one another (in a square: a facing b, c facing d) with their right hands joined in the center and their left hands on the shoulders of the man next to them.

In some Christian sects this is also a position of group prayer (still being practiced).

And as KFDW and Pat mentioned it has other roots, and some very similar signs are used by other non-christian groups (I read a piece on Incan glyphs and the swastica -- as we know it -- was used at times).

Nihilanthic
10th October 02, 06:14 PM
I heard the swastika used to be the ancient version of a smiley face or a peace sign, or a good-luck charm. Guess Hitler broke it, after putting it on EVERYTHING =/

<Me> John, what do you know about Zen Buddhism? <John> *smacks me*
<John> I'd have to smack you sometime...

matzahbal
10th October 02, 07:52 PM
Native American tribes have also been known to use the symbol.

The way hitler used is tha the reversed it, so it meant "death" pretty much the opposite of what everybody else wanted it to be.


"But some apes they gotta go, so we kill the ones we don't know" - 'Ape shall never kill Ape' by The Vandals

Berserk411
11th October 02, 01:21 AM
The symbol used to be used by the boy scouts too

Greese
11th October 02, 01:18 PM
The symbol used to be used by the boy scouts too

Fighting over the Internet is like Running in the Special Olympics
Even if you win Your still a Retart

I don't think so.

SGTStG
12th October 02, 12:21 AM
The symbol is still very common over in Korea. I was surprised when I first got there until somebody told me the mening behind it. When Iwas stationed in Italy (around 1990) there were hammers, and sickles everywere. Especially in the part of town that was restricted from us.

Tora Dojo
4th November 02, 10:27 PM
Here's web page that tries to explain the "manji" (japanese for the reverse swastica)...
take a look
http://members.tripod.co.jp/japanpage/themanji.htm