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Dr. Socially Liberal Fiscally Conservative Vermin
5th November 14, 12:12 PM
GNoOiXkXmYQ

AAAAAA
5th November 14, 12:41 PM
How do they create plasma in the specific spots? Maybe they condense three or more beams or use lenses? Do we actually have such precise mechanical lenses and mirrors to do such a thing, with that accuracy and at that distance? A thousandth of a degree off target or a microsecond too late (placeholder fractions)and it wouldn't work I presume.

Dr. Socially Liberal Fiscally Conservative Vermin
5th November 14, 12:44 PM
Yeah definitely high precision engineering.

Feryk
5th November 14, 01:55 PM
Fucking wicked as shit!

resolve
5th November 14, 10:31 PM
One step closer to a true hologram.

Üser Friendly
9th November 14, 09:47 AM
I like the emergency situation application

Alas it is most likely to be developed to project giant arrows pointing at targets for bombing missions

Cullion
9th November 14, 09:55 AM
GNoOiXkXmYQ

This technology was demonstrated at CES in 2011.

KfVS-npfVuY

Cullion
9th November 14, 09:56 AM
How do they create plasma in the specific spots? Maybe they condense three or more beams or use lenses? Do we actually have such precise mechanical lenses and mirrors to do such a thing, with that accuracy and at that distance? A thousandth of a degree off target or a microsecond too late (placeholder fractions)and it wouldn't work I presume.

We were able to land people on the moon in 1969. 1969.

Dr. Socially Liberal Fiscally Conservative Vermin
9th November 14, 10:31 AM
This technology was demonstrated at CES in 2011.

Then I demand to know why you didnt tell us about it earlier?

NoBowie
9th November 14, 12:11 PM
We were able to land people on the moon in 1969. 1969.

Not you, redcoat. Us. Just because you work for a U.S. company doesn't mean you can share in the joy that is NASA.

;P

Cullion
9th November 14, 01:42 PM
Not you, redcoat. Us. Just because you work for a U.S. company doesn't mean you can share in the joy that is NASA.

;P

If we hadn't provided a convenient target for Werner von Braun to hone his applied rocketry skills there would be no Operation Paperclip and no NASA.

NoBowie
9th November 14, 02:30 PM
If we hadn't provided a convenient target for Werner von Braun to hone his applied rocketry skills there would be no Operation Paperclip and no NASA.

So we can blame Native Americans for U.S. gun culture and school shootings?

Cullion
9th November 14, 02:57 PM
So we can blame Native Americans for U.S. gun culture and school shootings?

Tobacco addiction is their fault too.

Üser Friendly
9th November 14, 03:29 PM
And the bubble in the glass bead market

resolve
13th November 14, 10:26 PM
How do they create plasma in the specific spots? Maybe they condense three or more beams or use lenses? Do we actually have such precise mechanical lenses and mirrors to do such a thing, with that accuracy and at that distance? A thousandth of a degree off target or a microsecond too late (placeholder fractions)and it wouldn't work I presume.


Cuz math.

nihilist
14th November 14, 03:21 AM
One step closer to a sighting of Jebus.

Cullion
14th November 14, 02:42 PM
It may be that 'aiming' the beam isn't about being super-amazingly-precise with moving parts like mirrors, as it is about turning the beam intensity up at just the right split-second to heat up the point you wanted.

When you think about how the image in CRT TVs & Monitors was produced, that was a pretty amazing feat of timing. It was ultra-precise control of the intensity of a thin beam of electrons being fanned across the whole screen many, many times per second.

Whilst the distance was shorter and it was only working in 2 dimensions, those images were much, much more complicated than what they're currently producing with Laser Volumetric displays.

The timing and precision available with state of the art electronics is truly extraordinary.

We will see R2D2 like holograms ('Help Me Obiwan, You're my only hope') fairly soon. The issue is going to be that they'll probably be dangerously hot to the touch.