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MEGA JESUS-SAMA
16th December 10, 03:57 AM
Post-classical guitar theory can be widely divided into two differing schools. The first is is the Eddie Lang school, and the second is the Charlie Christian school.

In the 19th and early 20th centuries the primary chording instrument in pop bands was the four string tenor or plectrum banjo, which proved more apt than the gut-string guitar at projecting across the room and cutting through the rest of the band. As late as the 1920s this instrument as still a common feature in rhythm sections.


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Three major technological advances in the early 20th century would arm the guitar with an arsenal with which to usurp the banjo. The first was metal strings. The second was archtop construction, a method of guitar construction inspired by mandolins and violins. Arching the top and back of a guitar gave it more strength, which allowed it to be built more lightly, and the floating bridge design, also inspired by the mandolin and violin, was lighter and allowed the strings to drive the top harder, resulting in a much nosier guitar. The final major advancement was the perfection of ribbon microphones and audio equipment that allowed the acoustic signal of the guitar to be captured and amplified.

The real killer of the tenor banjo, however, was the virtuoso Eddie Lang. Lang landed a spot the Paul Whitman Orchestra and later a spot accompanying Bing Crosby, which quickly made him the most famous guitarist in the United States.


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Lang's style was largely influenced by classical theory, adapted for the nuances of the new metal-strung guitar. Lang also incorporated, and heavily influenced the development of, blues guitar when he appeared in some of the first interracial recordings with fellow guitarist Lonnie Johnson.


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This style of guitar playing was typified by swung 4/4 rhythms, the chord almost always struck on each beat. Filler notes and solos were constructed with chords and arpeggios, and chord extensions were still used sparingly compared to later era guitar. Here are some examples of guitarists in this school:


Quintette du Hot Club de France - Limehouse Blues (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=En7EGSxUbTM)
Carl Kress, here with Eddie Lang - Pickin My Way (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uhcrRuTsPFI)
Blind Willie McTell - Statesboro Blues (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fnWxZtI3ONY)
Oscar Aleman - La Vida con Swing (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BkM8Kwzh9j8)

Another new technological advancement came in the 1930s, the electric guitar pickup. Early pickups were prone to feedback, distortion, and had trouble achieving an even response from all guitar strings - that is, some strings would sound louder than others - and so did not initially gain wide acceptance on the six-string guitar, although they had some success on lapsteel guitars. Then, in the early 1940s, Benny Goodman added a new guitarist to his band named Charlie Christian. Christian was the first guitarist to exploit the idiosyncrasies of the electric guitar, balancing its sound and using its distortion to shape his guitar tone.


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Christian's musical style was a significant departure from the Lang school. Its rhythms were looser, and its soloing relied on single-note, scalar melodies. Whereas solos under the Lang school were grounded in the song's head, or melody, and chose notes from the chords as they were sounded, Christian's school gave musicians more freedom to depart from the melody and use notes from outside of the progression. A series of recordings Christian cut with the rest of Goodman's orchestra without Goodman's jive-ass conducting were instrumental (har) in the development of bop and post-bop jazz.


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Christian's mainstream recordings with the Goodman orchestra were popular enough, but the truly innovative work was seldom heard except by musicians. A few pioneering guitarists, chief among them T-Bone Walker, applied them to pop forms of music, including the blues.


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Walker's style became the style of the blues and rock of the 50s, which actually has little to do with the Folk Blues of the 20s and 30s. These blues forms had simpler progressions, but more complex harmonies that heavily featured chord extensions and scalar improvisation; this is where the famous "blues" scale, a pentatonic feature flattened notes, actually derives. Even modern rock, jazz, and much bleeding edge avant garde guitar theory is still heavily grounded in the school of Christian and Walker.


Grant Green - No. 1 Green St. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GvthzbBFCm)
Pete Cosey - Ife (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hcBpFgEIfBI)

And that is why Robert Johnson can blow me, The End.

nihilist
16th December 10, 04:01 AM
You have issues that can probably only be worked out in therapy.

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
16th December 10, 04:03 AM
Excuse me, this is a serious thread.

nihilist
16th December 10, 04:04 AM
Excellent. Have fun being serious.

Nasreal
16th December 10, 01:00 PM
But....but...how would Robert Johnson blow you? He's de~...oh you sick bastard..

lant3rn
16th December 10, 03:24 PM
Do you play an instrument MJS, or know any musical theory?

Or do you learn this stuff just to feel superior to the "posers"?

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
16th December 10, 03:26 PM
I play the guitar. I know quite a bit of music harmony.

KO'd N DOA
16th December 10, 04:41 PM
That was awesome!

Where did Hal Leonard derive his theory from?
Thats were I got started.

Kein Haar
16th December 10, 04:43 PM
You play your organ. And that's it.

lant3rn
16th December 10, 04:49 PM
I play the guitar. I know quite a bit of music harmony.

Cool, Mosts "guitarists" don't even know the key of a standard tuned guitar.

Although,"Music Harmony" is kind of vague since it covers a wide range of topics like Chord progression, Intervals and mood.

So i'm not really sure what you meant exactly but i like the sound of it.

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
16th December 10, 05:03 PM
I meant to type music theory. "Harmony" was a brain fart because I've had the concept on my mind lately.

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
16th December 10, 05:05 PM
That was awesome!

Where did Hal Leonard derive his theory from?
Thats were I got started.

Is this a trick question? Hal Leonard is just a sheet music publisher. The name derives from the two founders. I don't know who wrote their guitar theory book. The Berklee ones are better.

lant3rn
16th December 10, 05:07 PM
I meant to type music theory. "Harmony" was a brain fart because I've had the concept on my mind lately.

Lol that was my guess.

KO'd N DOA
16th December 10, 05:07 PM
You have issues that can probably only be worked out in music therapy.

Fixered that fer ya

FickleFingerOfFate
16th December 10, 05:44 PM
MJS has theory, but my guitars are nicer than his.

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
16th December 10, 05:47 PM
Do you live on the West Coat? Are you going to that SoCal throwdown? Sirc wants me to come, but if there's a jam session afterwards I might actually show up.

FickleFingerOfFate
16th December 10, 05:48 PM
I live in Detroit, and can't throw down due to a back injury.

Nasreal
17th December 10, 12:00 AM
I live in Detroit, and can't throw down due to a back injury.

What kind of guitars do you have FFF? I don't have anything too impressive, but I am pretty proud of my Martin. Love that guitar.

Dr. Socially Liberal Fiscally Conservative Vermin
17th December 10, 07:19 AM
Thanks for thread MJS

: D

FickleFingerOfFate
17th December 10, 04:55 PM
What kind of guitars do you have FFF? I don't have anything too impressive, but I am pretty proud of my Martin. Love that guitar.

http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s298/FickleFingerOfFate/100_0667.jpg

The upper left, and all of the ones on the floor, are mine. The rest are my son's.

My son's new BC Rich Virgo, and my new Telecaster are not yet pictured.
Mom/Wife will not release custody of them until Christmas.

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
17th December 10, 06:41 PM
I hate all of them.

FickleFingerOfFate
17th December 10, 06:54 PM
Since you can't afford most of them,
you won't have to worry about it.

WarPhalange
18th December 10, 01:43 AM
But Robert Johnson done sold his soul to the devil!

FickleFingerOfFate
18th December 10, 05:26 AM
Coffee money at best.

Most musicians have no soul.

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
18th December 10, 06:59 AM
Since you can't afford most of them,
you won't have to worry about it.

no
no jazzmasters or jaguars

FickleFingerOfFate
18th December 10, 08:14 AM
no
no jazzmasters or jaguars

It's strictly a matter of taste, but neither I, nor my son, care for those designs.

Sales history has proved our opinion out on this subject.

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
18th December 10, 08:24 AM
quilted finishes are ugly
but more importantly i require electrics with vibrato bars and i prefer strat style pup selectors or toggle style selectors

FickleFingerOfFate
18th December 10, 11:18 AM
quilted finishes are ugly

So, you dislike the finish on one of the ones pictured. What an excellent criteria for banging the whole lot of them.


but more importantly i require electrics with vibrato bars

Tremelo bridges are for people with poor technique, or gimmicks such as dive bombs.



and i prefer strat style pup selectors or toggle style selectors

More have this style than not. Do you plan on making a salient point anytime soon?

You may know theory, but, you know fuck-all about hardware.

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
18th December 10, 11:21 AM
I've played several of those guitars and the pup selectors do not get the response I'm looking for when I rock them back and forth.

FickleFingerOfFate
18th December 10, 02:40 PM
Try replacing them with the Gibson or Fender manufactured switch.

Just because it needs a little tweaking doesn't make it junk. Don't be so lazy.

The PRS switches are first rate, even the SE series.

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
18th December 10, 02:54 PM
It's not just the switch, but also the type of pickups and their placement. With only two pups, and buckers at that, you don't get as much response from rocking the selector back and forth while sustaining a note.

see 0:31
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I find single coils and five way Strat-style switches work best for this, the former because they seem to retain a few subtler frequencies that buckers do not, and the latter because the Gibson style switch seems to cut out briefly between certain selections - interesting, but not what I want. I want to experiment with some single coils wound like the old school ES-150 pups, but I don't have the funds.

My dream guitar would look absolutely fucking terrible.