PDA

View Full Version : Why Jogging is Awesome



DAYoung
10th July 10, 12:21 AM
http://www.abc.net.au/unleashed/images/jogging_340.jpg'I believe that the Good Lord gave us a finite number of heartbeats,í lunar astronaut Neil Armstrong once told Walter Cronkite, Ďand I'm damned if I'm going to use up mine running up and down a streetí.

I donít know if this is physiologically accurate, but itís a telling admission: thereís something odd about jogging. One small step makes sense Ė but not thousands of large ones, it seems.

Running certainly is one of the stranger rituals of our age. Thereís no ball to fight over; no camaraderie as teammates confront danger or exhaustion as one; no neat score and failure. All over the world, folks dress in superhero fitted tights, garish shoes, and branded armbands and earphones (they donít need to talk to teammates).

And then, the pointy end of the runnerís absurdity: they run to nowhere. They hurry, of course Ė they plod, canter and trot, panting and staring ahead. But theyíre running, not to pass on news of Greeceís victory over Persia, or to train for a moon mission Ė theyíre running for the sake of running; for the sublime cadence of one foot in front of another.

Many, myself included, undoubtedly take up jogging for fitness. And as a cardio-vascular workout, it is unparalleled in its combination of simplicity, efficiency and effectiveness. We donít need a bat, ball, helmet or goalpost; no acreage of clipped turf, swimming pool or rectangle of preened clay.

Jogging can be done well with a good pair of shoes, weather-suitable clothes and a neighbourhood footpath or nature-strip. Good technique is important to avoid injury, but most runners donít need a coach or workshop Ė they just run carefully and with restraint. Like walking or talking, itís natural.

Importantly, the physical payoff is fast and palpable. There are undoubtedly some risks: knee injuries, cardiac arrest, spinal compression, for example. These can be exacerbated when very sedentary or ill people hurl themselves into sprints or marathon-style events. But research suggests that, for most people, the risks are outweighed by the tangible physical and mental health benefits: lower risk of heart disease, diabetes, cognitive disorders and hypertension.

Put simply, if oneís lifestyle is inactive and unhealthy, jogging is a straightforward and economical way to improve things.

Given the prevalence of obesity in Australia, this is a good case for jogging. According to Federal Governmentís studies of Body Mass Index (BMI), 30 per cent of Australian adults are overweight, and 15 per cent are obese.

The BMI system has its limitations, of course Ė according to the Federal Governmentís Department of Health and Aging, Iím Ďpre-obeseí. According to my calculations, so was Hugh Jackman as Wolverine. It can be a clumsy measure.

Nonetheless, itís clear that sedentary habits and poor dietary habits are undermining many folksí health. Jogging is a helpful reply to this: itís immediate, easily-available and reliable.

But as important as this is, itís no longer why I jog. When I put on my silly luminescent lime green shoes, and my baggy tracksuit pants, Iíve other longings in mind. I know Iím maintaining my health, but this is not what chiefly tantalises me.

First, I simply have energy to burn; an overwhelming feeling that I have to expend calories. Like my four-year-old son, I get jittery if I sit still for too long. As a stay-at-home writer and dad, I donít have the time or money to visit the gym. But I can quickly put on my shoes and hit the footpath, and be back in time for Lego. And if I donít get this energy out, Iím bad company Ė put clinically, running encourages pro-social behaviour. I doubt Iím alone in this.

Second, it offers incredible peace-of-mind. Like most aerobic exercise, it affords an alert calmness. After running, my mind gives the impression of clarity and commitment; that it is alive, spontaneous, but not wandering or itchy.

Third, and most crucially; I savour the experience of running. It's not quite like football or sparring in martial arts, which require rapid, trained reflexes, and focus on kicking, hitting and dodging. It involves effort and perseverance, but not precise concentration. While jogging, the mind wanders, ascends, dances - it's a kind of rhythmic, sweaty meditation.

It also offers an enlivening solitude. Alone with myself, and my exertion and discomfort, I've an opportunity for honesty: about my mental and physical limits. There's no-one else to blame; no easy distractions - I must press on or give up my illusions.

This can be daunting but also refreshing: the existential simplicity of felt responsibility and commitment.

Again, this isn't for everyone. Illness, age and injury are real barriers to running. I have to be very careful I don't aggravate my old neck. And there's no guarantees that jogging will give me my three score and ten.

But in an age of wasteline prosperity and time poverty, running is a gift: a healthy, invigorating, calming habit. And like all rituals, it only take patience and perseverance to make the magic. It's not rocket science, but it is worth a few of my precious heartbeats.

http://www.abc.net.au/unleashed/stories/s2930556.htm

=================

Anyone agree, disagree or want to plead indifference?

And anyone else think the comments are a bit pessimistic in parts? I mean, it's not like we're talking about cage fighting (http://www.theage.com.au/opinion/society-and-culture/forget-the-cheap-shots-cage-fighting-is-a-virtuous-sport-20100411-s0ot.html).

(I agree on rock climbing, though. I'd like to try it.)

EuropIan
10th July 10, 12:52 AM
You could opine on the attempt to make running into an MMO (http://nikerunning.nike.com/)

The only other thing I guess is that I hate shinsplits

DAYoung
10th July 10, 01:05 AM
Hmm. Shin splints are from bad shoes, hard surfaces and heavy heel landings, yes?

I haven't heard of it being a common jogger's problem.

danno
10th July 10, 01:07 AM
And anyone else think the comments are a bit pessimistic in parts? I mean, it's not like we're talking about cage fighting (http://www.theage.com.au/opinion/society-and-culture/forget-the-cheap-shots-cage-fighting-is-a-virtuous-sport-20100411-s0ot.html).

if you decide to run marathons and shit, don't be surprised when you get arthritis or whatever. but that's no reason not to do at least some runing. anyone who says they won't run because of potential injury is weak. at least admit that you're lazy or not interested. i admit that i am when it comes to running.

it's like saying "don't do BJJ cos you'll have bad shoulders and knees and other men will rub their balls in your face". yeah, i know that, but obviously i feel there are things to gain which outweigh this.

besides, if you don't have any aches and pains by the time you're 60-70, you've scarcely taken advantage of a body which now only has 10-20 years of relative inactivity left anyway.

DAYoung
10th July 10, 01:18 AM
if you decide to run marathons and shit, don't be surprised when you get arthritis or whatever. but that's no reason not to do at least some runing. anyone who says they won't run because of potential injury is weak. at least admit that you're lazy or not interested. i admit that i am when it comes to running.

it's like saying "don't do BJJ cos you'll have bad shoulders and knees and other men will rub their balls in your face". yeah, i know that, but obviously i feel there are things to gain which outweigh this.

besides, if you don't have any aches and pains by the time you're 60-70, you've scarcely taken advantage of a body which now only has 10-20 years of relative inactivity left anyway.

I agree. It's like not thinking in case you think bad thoughts.

OK. It's not like that. But it does express my 'dumb rationalisation' point.

EuropIan
10th July 10, 01:22 AM
Sooooo no comment on the MMO aspect?

DAYoung
10th July 10, 01:38 AM
Sooooo no comment on the MMO aspect?

It isn't really, is it? It's actual jogging competitions, recorded and communicated online.

Perhaps I've missed it. Can you give me a link?

bob
10th July 10, 01:42 AM
Nicely put.

Many of the comments are pure retard. People can do jack shit their whole lives and still get arthritis. There's a strong genetic component. And yeah, if you don't listen to your body, you will break it eventually.

Oddly enough I don't run for solitude like many people. I really struggle to run alone and when I run with spouse I usually pass the time chatting. I do other stuff to find that hit of clarity.

Damon, is John Birmingham a friend of yours? I've always enjoyed his stuff.

EuropIan
10th July 10, 02:04 AM
It isn't really, is it? It's actual jogging competitions, recorded and communicated online.

Perhaps I've missed it. Can you give me a link?
You are thinking in small boxes.

This is an MMO. It even has grinding.

DAYoung
10th July 10, 02:25 AM
Nicely put.

Many of the comments are pure retard. People can do jack shit their whole lives and still get arthritis. There's a strong genetic component. And yeah, if you don't listen to your body, you will break it eventually.

Oddly enough I don't run for solitude like many people. I really struggle to run alone and when I run with spouse I usually pass the time chatting. I do other stuff to find that hit of clarity.

Damon, is John Birmingham a friend of yours? I've always enjoyed his stuff.

Thanks, mate. Yes, the 'exercise equals injury' excuse is lame, and ignores not only genetics, but the consequences of not exercising.

Obviously running isn't the only way to get one's heart rate up, but (as I said) it's a very efficient, effective, cheap, simple exercise.

I used to run with my wife, but our regimes, attitudes and skills were too different. Good times, though.

On John Birmingham, I've corresponded with him a little, after he read this. He's also interested in martial arts, which is good. I like his stuff also - some of his recent journalism's been excellent (e.g. on video games).

DAYoung
10th July 10, 02:28 AM
You are thinking in small boxes.

This is an MMO. It even has grinding.

Start a new thread about this. Define MMO. And then show how Nike's stuff fits this description.

Adouglasmhor
10th July 10, 02:47 AM
Any reason I don't jog any more is I don't have a dog just now and I can't be bothered running tooled up.

DAYoung
10th July 10, 02:50 AM
Any reason I don't jog any more is I don't have a dog just now and I can't be bothered running tooled up.

You mean lead and dog and poo-bag and so on?

Yeah, annoying.

Can't you just carry the dog? Lazy.

danno
10th July 10, 02:55 AM
this is me being a faggot:

hay guise, don't go outside - you might get hurt

that's what a faggot sounds like

Adouglasmhor
10th July 10, 03:00 AM
I don't have a dog just now not allowed in our flats, I mean I live in a less than genteel area and if you have a dog you have protection from the dog plus a chain lead as a weapon, poo bags and scoop go in a day sac, no problem (I reckon it's a lot less warm here than where you are), plus if you and dog are running the dog will wait till you have stopped before taking a dump. Dogs also love Fartlek training.

DAYoung
10th July 10, 03:01 AM
this is me being a faggot:

hay guise, don't go outside - you might get hurt

that's what a faggot sounds like

I wouldn't say 'faggot'. But 'sook', 'wuss' and 'soft whiner' come to mind.

Let me put it another way: when I'm more physical than you, you're in trouble.

Adouglasmhor
10th July 10, 03:02 AM
this is me being a faggot:

hay guise, don't go outside - you might get hurt

that's what a faggot sounds like

We already knew what you sounded like thanks.

DAYoung
10th July 10, 03:03 AM
I don't have a dog just now not allowed in our flats, I mean I live in a less than genteel area and if you have a dog you have protection from the dog plus a chain lead as a weapon, poo bags and scoop go in a day sac, no problem (I reckon it's a lot less warm here than where you are), plus if you and dog are running the dog will wait till you have stopped before taking a dump. Dogs also love Fartlek training.

Here's our winter right now: http://weather.theage.com.au/local.jsp

EuropIan
10th July 10, 03:11 AM
Start a new thread about this. Define MMO. And then show how Nike's stuff fits this description.
Not today but since this is something that interests me, I'll have something (hopefully articles of confed-worthy) by tomorrow evening (my time, so Monday for you.)

Adouglasmhor
10th July 10, 03:18 AM
Here's our winter right now: http://weather.theage.com.au/local.jsp

Here's our Summer
http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2005-8/1070113/ScreenshotBBC%20WeatherGlasgow%20.jpg

danno
10th July 10, 03:20 AM
I wouldn't say 'faggot'. But 'sook', 'wuss' and 'soft whiner' come to mind.

Let me put it another way: when I'm more physical than you, you're in trouble.

got nothing against homosexuals. it's the faggots i'm worried about.

DAYoung
10th July 10, 03:33 AM
Here's our Summer

Hah. Awesome. It's like we have identical seasons once a year, before the extremes kick in.

DAYoung
10th July 10, 03:35 AM
got nothing against homosexuals. it's the faggots i'm worried about.

Yeah, I get the distinction, and hear the overtones (i.e. unmanly, soft, whiny, effete). And I know you're not homophobic.

It's just not a word I use.

Adouglasmhor
10th July 10, 03:36 AM
Hah. Awesome. It's like we have identical seasons once a year, before the extremes kick in.
That's what I thought too.

danno
10th July 10, 03:38 AM
Yeah, I get the distinction, and hear the overtones (i.e. unmanly, soft, whiny, effete). And I know you're not homophobic.

It's just not a word I use.

i wouldn't use it around anyone who might be offended.

...oh snap!

DAYoung
10th July 10, 03:39 AM
That's what I thought too.

So it's important not to complain from June to August. Because however bad it is, it'll be worse later in the year.

DAYoung
10th July 10, 03:44 AM
snap

oops upside your head

resolve
10th July 10, 03:54 AM
I used to run for the joy of it. It made me feel free. Soccer was my favorite sport too and Football (american handegg) wasn't bad either.

Until I destroyed my knee mountain biking. I'm pretty sure I will never run again. Although I do give it a good jog wearing a knee brace every now and then just to show it who's boss!

Adouglasmhor
10th July 10, 04:00 AM
So it's important not to complain from June to August. Because however bad it is, it'll be worse later in the year.

I have excellent wet weather gear, and we did have really good weather a couple of weeks ago, temps in the 20s to 30s and no rain. I don't have my langlauf stuff any more but snow and ice aren't the end of the world.

TBH jogging bores me and I would rather just do a cardio class in the gym, which casts me nothing extra on my membership. They do have jogging networks as well.

Harpy
10th July 10, 04:03 AM
DA - fine article :)

Running is the one time I am totally in myself. I am challenged by my body, mind and often my emotions. It is synchronising them that allows me to 'break the wall/s' and keep putting one foot in front of the other. Focused and controlled breathing, visualising one's muscles at work, brushing aside the momentary niggles and pains that try to stop you...and then sprinting hell for leather at the end to feel the rush. Cheeks blooming with colour, pleased with myself but with no one to share it with, the after effects of a good long run are the skip in my step and my secret smile for the rest of the day.

Of course Coach Kein has put a stop to that. He'll be along shortly.

DAYoung
10th July 10, 04:07 AM
I have excellent wet weather gear, and we did have really good weather a couple of weeks ago, temps in the 20s to 30s and no rain. I don't have my langlauf stuff any more but snow and ice aren't the end of the world.

TBH jogging bores me and I would rather just do a cardio class in the gym, which casts me nothing extra on my membership. They do have jogging networks as well.

Before I reply: can you put spoiler tags around your image? It's breaking my interdudes.

I don't mind running in the wet/cold, but I've not encountered your winters. Having said this, you've probably not run in our summers. Running in 40ļC is tough.

As for boring, I feel this way about jogging machines.

DAYoung
10th July 10, 04:11 AM
DA - fine article :)

Running is the one time I am totally in myself. I am challenged by my body, mind and often my emotions. It is synchronising them that allows me to 'break the wall/s' and keep putting one foot in front of the other. Focused and controlled breathing, visualising one's muscles at work, brushing aside the momentary niggles and pains that try to stop you...and then sprinting hell for leather at the end to feel the rush. Cheeks blooming with colour, pleased with myself but with no one to share it with, the after effects of a good long run are the skip in my step and my secret smile for the rest of the day.

You know, if I didn't know what you looked like, that'd be very sexy.

But seriously: I do feel very much myself when jogging. I've felt like that fighting and doing forms.

('Flow' experience, I suppose.)

Harpy
10th July 10, 04:14 AM
Running down the ice cream truck is a skill I tell you!!!

Adouglasmhor
10th July 10, 04:15 AM
Before I reply: can you put spoiler tags around your image? It's breaking my interdudes.
I resized is that better you might need to clear cache or reload?
I don't mind running in the wet/cold, but I've not encountered your winters. Having said this, you've probably not run in our summers. Running in 40ļC is tough. I have run in Belize and Cyprus and Germany

As for boring, I feel this way about jogging machines.

I hate jogging machines as well, I would rather do circuits or body combat in a group. I don't mind the X trainer.

DAYoung
10th July 10, 04:23 AM
I hate jogging machines as well, I would rather do circuits or body combat in a group. I don't mind the X trainer.

I've never really done the gym thing, so I can't comment.

As for Cyprus, Belize and Germany, I don't know what this means. Can you elaborate?

I'd be surprised if their summers were hotter than ours. It's not just the ambient heat, it's the intensity of the sun. It burns you here very, very quickly. I remember being in Greece, in hot weather - the ambient temperature was the same, but the sun was just warming, not burning.

DAYoung
10th July 10, 04:24 AM
Running down the ice cream truck is a skill I tell you!!!

As is hanging on to the bumper with your teeth. Not very dignified, but certainly a skill.

Are you still running long distance?

bob
10th July 10, 05:00 AM
Also, lol @ the abc demographic (late middle aged, upper middle class self identified iconclasts).

"I don't see why these effete yuppies feel the need to ponce around in their lycra and $250 shoes when a brisk walk in the countryside and a spot of woodchopping will do just as well. I bet I get much more satisfaction out of doing the composting at our weekend home in Bowral/the Grampians/the Noosa Hinterland than those masochistic red-faced executives."

DAYoung
10th July 10, 05:21 AM
Also, lol @ the abc demographic (late middle aged, upper middle class self identified iconclasts).

"I don't see why these effete yuppies feel the need to ponce around in their lycra and $250 shoes when a brisk walk in the countryside and a spot of woodchopping will do just as well. I bet I get much more satisfaction out of doing the composting at our weekend home in Bowral/the Grampians/the Noosa Hinterland than those masochistic red-faced executives."

I didn't notice this on first reading. But, yes, there's a bit of this.

The comments on my Star Trek piece are worse.

Ajamil
10th July 10, 08:39 AM
I agree, though swimming is much more meditative for me. You forgot it's the best defense against the zombies.

Joggers also bounce. Bouncing is fun to watch. I <3 joggers.

MrGalt
10th July 10, 10:35 AM
If a "stay at home writer" doesn't have the time to go to the gym, who the fuck does? I'm a wander all over Japan teacher and I still spend 8-10 hours a week in the gym not including karate.

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
10th July 10, 10:36 AM
DAYoung has a life tho

HappyOldGuy
10th July 10, 12:13 PM
Good article, but I do not love running. It didn't suck when I lived on the beach, but when you live in some urban shithole where you have to drive to get to somewhere you can run, it just doesn't work at all for me.

Choking people unconscious is more fun.

Cullion
10th July 10, 12:25 PM
I always hated running distances measured in miles, and was never particularly good at it.

I always used to get my fitness from MA classes and weights with supplimentary 'cardio' coming from 20-30 minute sessions of callisthenics at home. There's something about the monotony of jogging that makes it much harder for me to mentally screen out the physical discomfort than if I expended the same time and effort playing basketball or rugby, or switching around a circuit of bodyweight exercises.

When I decided I wanted to join the reserves I made myself get into it, starting with the couch to 5k programme and then just extending the duration a few minutes at a time until I could keep going for an hour, mixed with a military-style PT class in the park which was a solid hour of interval running, sets of bodyweight exercises and running along carrying logs in a team etc...

With an ipod and a varied and picturesque landscape to run through, solo running was okay, but I'll never enjoy it to the extent that I'd try and run marathons. It was always a 'I'm doing this because I need to pass a test' thing for me.

I still prefer callisthenics and kettlebells for stamina training and general 'fitness' if I'm training on my own.

jvjim
10th July 10, 12:42 PM
I just discovered I enjoy running, but I injured my lower back after going through the Couch to 5K program. This happened after years of weightlifting and wrestling without any serious injury.

Cullion
10th July 10, 12:44 PM
What did I tell you about running when you're carrying extra weight?

KIDS TODAY NEVER LISTEN!

jvjim
10th July 10, 12:49 PM
SHUT UP OLD MAN!

Cullion
10th July 10, 01:04 PM
Physically speaking, you could be my kid brother, except I didn't have to really start worrying about what I ate until my late 20s.

These days I have periods where I pork up and get about as chubby as the photos you've posted of yourself at your chubbiest, interspersed with more focussed periods where my fat percentage gets down into the teens and I begin to glimpse abs again.

Trust me, guys built like you can be stronger, healther and more vigorous than all your peers if you train right, but repetitive impact on the joints with that bodymass is not an intelligent way to burn off the lard.

If you enjoy running that's great, but you really ought to do low-impact 'cardio' alongside your weights and MA until you're back down in the neighbourhood of an atheletic bodyfat percentage, before you start pounding the streets again.

DAYoung
10th July 10, 04:32 PM
If a "stay at home writer" doesn't have the time to go to the gym, who the fuck does? I'm a wander all over Japan teacher and I still spend 8-10 hours a week in the gym not including karate.

Most of my time is spent with my two kids (four and eighteen months). Writing is done in a spare hour or two, in between kid-wrangling and household chores.

I'll have more time when my son's at school, and might join a gym or club.

DAYoung
10th July 10, 04:35 PM
DAYoung has a life tho

Do not!

DAYoung
10th July 10, 04:37 PM
Good article, but I do not love running. It didn't suck when I lived on the beach, but when you live in some urban shithole where you have to drive to get to somewhere you can run, it just doesn't work at all for me.

Choking people unconscious is more fun.

Yes, I sympathise. Here in the suburbs it's great, but if we were inner city it'd be crappier.

DAYoung
10th July 10, 04:38 PM
I always hated running distances measured in miles, and was never particularly good at it.

I always used to get my fitness from MA classes and weights with supplimentary 'cardio' coming from 20-30 minute sessions of callisthenics at home. There's something about the monotony of jogging that makes it much harder for me to mentally screen out the physical discomfort than if I expended the same time and effort playing basketball or rugby, or switching around a circuit of bodyweight exercises.

When I decided I wanted to join the reserves I made myself get into it, starting with the couch to 5k programme and then just extending the duration a few minutes at a time until I could keep going for an hour, mixed with a military-style PT class in the park which was a solid hour of interval running, sets of bodyweight exercises and running along carrying logs in a team etc...

With an ipod and a varied and picturesque landscape to run through, solo running was okay, but I'll never enjoy it to the extent that I'd try and run marathons. It was always a 'I'm doing this because I need to pass a test' thing for me.

I still prefer callisthenics and kettlebells for stamina training and general 'fitness' if I'm training on my own.

I preferred martial arts for fitness (i.e. conditioning in class, including randori), but my injury's put this on hold. In the mean time, running's been a godsend, atheistically speaking.

DAYoung
10th July 10, 04:40 PM
Physically speaking, you could be my kid brother, except I didn't have to really start worrying about what I ate until my late 20s.

These days I have periods where I pork up and get about as chubby as the photos you've posted of yourself at your chubbiest, interspersed with more focussed periods where my fat percentage gets down into the teens and I begin to glimpse abs again.

Trust me, guys built like you can be stronger, healther and more vigorous than all your peers if you train right, but repetitive impact on the joints with that bodymass is not an intelligent way to burn off the lard.

If you enjoy running that's great, but you really ought to do low-impact 'cardio' alongside your weights and MA until you're back down in the neighbourhood of an atheletic bodyfat percentage, before you start pounding the streets again.

Part of the trick is figuring out what 'extra weight' means. I"m now 78kg. I was about 105kg, I think.

But I still feel heavy when I run. And I want to put muscle on.

Thoughts?

DAYoung
10th July 10, 04:43 PM
I just discovered I enjoy running, but I injured my lower back after going through the Couch to 5K program. This happened after years of weightlifting and wrestling without any serious injury.

What did you do? My lower back hurts, but nothing yet that'd stop me running.

Yet. (It will, in time, I'm sure. Either back or knees.)

Cullion
10th July 10, 04:48 PM
But I still feel heavy when I run. And I want to put muscle on.

Thoughts?

Well, I don't really know what your injury will allow. I do remember you saying that pushups were a problem, so I guess that anything involving serious resistance with the upper body might be a problem.

You might get some muscle out of the hormonal effects of swapping some of your long steady jogs for intense intervals of fast running (perhaps up-hill sprints), as long as you eat enough lean meat or fish.

DAYoung
10th July 10, 04:49 PM
I eat lots of fish, and I've cut out a lot of carbs. I often eat fish when I might've had bread.

I tried pushups last night. Just a few. If that works out, I'll do more. Then more.

I'm also doing weights.

Harpy
10th July 10, 04:50 PM
DA - I believe this is where just one session of plyometrics (or Tabata style running) and one strength session a week can give you that 'lightness'.

How often do you jog in a week?

DAYoung
10th July 10, 04:52 PM
DA - I believe this is where just one session of plyometrics (or Tabata style running) and one strength session a week can give you that 'lightness'.

How often do you jog in a week?

From four to seven times. It depends on what's happening. I intersperse it with weights and, now, the odd bit of sparring with a mate.

Gotta run, folks. Talk later.

jubei33
10th July 10, 07:01 PM
Most of my time is spent with my two kids (four and eighteen months). Writing is done in a spare hour or two, in between kid-wrangling and household chores.

I'll have more time when my son's at school, and might join a gym or club.

Yeah, I know what you mean. Work out times are irregular to say the least. I used to run an 8 mile course up in the mountains here, nobody around except the occasional farmer and the wild pheasants. The trail splits off into different routes over the mountains, so it can be a longer or shorter depending on if you choose left or right. I might get one of these once a month. I usually only have time for a 2 mile run in the morning before work now.


And then, the pointy end of the runner’s absurdity: they run to nowhere. They hurry, of course – they plod, canter and trot, panting and staring ahead. But they’re running, not to pass on news of Greece’s victory over Persia, or to train for a moon mission – they’re running for the sake of running; for the sublime cadence of one foot in front of another.

I disagree with this part. I think a lot of people run to accomplish a personal goal, which is much more important that running for the 'love of it'. Steeling yourself to run that last mile, especially when you think you can't, is a skill that can be applied in a lot of situations. Even then, it confuses distance for displacement in a way.

Adouglasmhor
11th July 10, 01:03 PM
I've never really done the gym thing, so I can't comment.

As for Cyprus, Belize and Germany, I don't know what this means. Can you elaborate?

I'd be surprised if their summers were hotter than ours. It's not just the ambient heat, it's the intensity of the sun. It burns you here very, very quickly. I remember being in Greece, in hot weather - the ambient temperature was the same, but the sun was just warming, not burning.


Cyprus it's dessert/scrub/bush in the interior and you can burn very quickly - in greece were you high altitude or lowlands? Germany is hot and not massively sunny except on glaciers etc where you can burn in no time. Belize is massive humidity really tiring.

DAYoung
11th July 10, 03:54 PM
Yeah, I know what you mean. Work out times are irregular to say the least. I used to run an 8 mile course up in the mountains here, nobody around except the occasional farmer and the wild pheasants. The trail splits off into different routes over the mountains, so it can be a longer or shorter depending on if you choose left or right. I might get one of these once a month. I usually only have time for a 2 mile run in the morning before work now.

That trail run sounds blissful. I daydream of lake runs.


I disagree with this part. I think a lot of people run to accomplish a personal goal, which is much more important that running for the 'love of it'. Steeling yourself to run that last mile, especially when you think you can't, is a skill that can be applied in a lot of situations. Even then, it confuses distance for displacement in a way.


Fair point. I recognise the goal-setting and skill-transfer stuff. But it's not what primarily motivates me (any more).

DAYoung
11th July 10, 03:56 PM
Cyprus it's dessert/scrub/bush in the interior and you can burn very quickly - in greece were you high altitude or lowlands? Germany is hot and not massively sunny except on glaciers etc where you can burn in no time. Belize is massive humidity really tiring.

We went to Ithaka in Greece, in the Ionian Islands. I don't know how typical this is.

Germany's hot? I get educated a little each day!

Humidity, I agree, is knackering. Really drains you.

Cullion
11th July 10, 04:02 PM
Germany's got more of a continental climate than England, so you can have hotter summers and colder winters.

DAYoung
11th July 10, 04:05 PM
Germany's got more of a continental climate than England, so you can have hotter summers and colder winters.

Can they really be anything like ours, i.e. 40ļC+?

Cullion
11th July 10, 04:07 PM
I doubt it. The Australian summer temperatures you describe are more like the hotter bits of the mediterranean, or North Africa.

Anything above 25 degrees feels hot to somebody used to a British climate. 30 degrees is a heatwave here.

jvjim
11th July 10, 04:12 PM
Pussies.

DAYoung
11th July 10, 04:14 PM
I'll withhold derision until I've faced an English winter.

bob
11th July 10, 04:15 PM
I agree with DA that European and North American sun just doesn't feel as strong, even at comparable temperatures.

Cullion
11th July 10, 04:15 PM
zQ0pDhvXBqw

That's ice. People do this in London every winter.

danno
11th July 10, 07:44 PM
i can't swim in even slightly cold water.

the coldest temp i've ever experienced was about -3C at about 2 in the morning. the warmest is 47C.

in the middle of summer i can get a little sunburnt in about 10 min back home.

Cullion
12th July 10, 09:43 AM
I think I'd be at serious risk of heat stroke if I spent more than an hour outside in Australian summer temperatures unless I had a couple of months to gradually acclimatise.

When I was a kid/teen we used to make a stupid macho thing out of how little insulation we could tolerate in the snow. You were a bit of a poofter if you couldn't laugh off a snowball fight in just a t-shirt and jeans.

Kein Haar
13th July 10, 02:12 AM
Although, it really doesn't get REALLY cold til you get over into, say, Poland, right? Then it starts to get seriously continental.

bob
13th July 10, 02:53 AM
You know where's hot? Brazil.

Adouglasmhor
13th July 10, 03:07 AM
Although, it really doesn't get REALLY cold til you get over into, say, Poland, right? Then it starts to get seriously continental.

My first year in Germany I went out for a walk down to the big NAAFI store in the town centre when it was dry and <-20c, wearing stretch jeans a bomber jacket, boots and T-shirt. I ended up jumping from standing on the toilet seat to land on my heels to make my balls come back out. Not the best experience of my life.

Kein Haar
13th July 10, 05:13 AM
Could you rephrase all of that?

Kein Haar
13th July 10, 05:14 AM
You know where's hot? Brazil.

Brasilia, you say?

You know who's from brazil, right?

AAAAAA
13th July 10, 07:10 AM
Running for me is one of the best times possible to listen to music. The physical exertion and the emotional load of good music combine in a powerful high.
Other activities aren't "mindless" enough to let you really soak in the music.

Also,

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WGbV7R-eS5s

Cullion
13th July 10, 08:45 AM
Although, it really doesn't get REALLY cold til you get over into, say, Poland, right? Then it starts to get seriously continental.

They always seem to have deeper and more frequent winter snow in central Europe, but I've only ever been during spring/summer. -20 c is the lowest temperature I've ever experienced in England.

The southern UK gets cold enough for ice and a few inches of snow most winters, but people dying of exposure or getting trapped in snow drifts is rare. Snow and ice are generally fun things that get you some time off school to go sledging, rather than a dangerous thing, to us.

There are parts of Russia where a temperature alarm sounding means you've got 5 minutes to get your family inside before ice crystals form inside their lungs and kill them.

Adouglasmhor
13th July 10, 04:47 PM
Could you rephrase all of that?

Which words did you not understand?

bob
13th July 10, 04:57 PM
Try it again without the accent.

Adouglasmhor
13th July 10, 05:07 PM
Try it again without the accent.

Mah first year in Germany Ah went it fur a donner doon tae th' big naafi stair in th' toon centre when it was dry an' <-20c, wearin' stent jeans a bomber jaekit, bitts an' t-shirt. Ah ended up jumpin' frae standin' oan th' lavvy seat tae lain oan mah heels tae make mah balls come back it. Nae th' best experience ay mah life.


Better?

bob
13th July 10, 05:09 PM
Much.