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TheMightyMcClaw
22nd June 10, 02:10 PM
As I continue to work my way down the player's handbook armor list, I've hit a new important rung:
Splint mail, motherf*ckers!

http://th04.deviantart.net/fs71/PRE/i/2010/173/0/d/Splint_mail_by_MetalArtisan.jpg

I finally have a sheet metal workshop setup, which means it's only a matter of time before I hit the the holy grail of armoring: plate armor. For a beginning project, however, I decided that some nice simple splints would be the best way to get the hang of the tools, all the while upping the armor class rating of my winter jacket.

resolve
22nd June 10, 02:32 PM
Image tags, you fails them.

TheMightyMcClaw
22nd June 10, 02:36 PM
Ah, shit. It's fixed now.

Steve
22nd June 10, 02:37 PM
That was my bad, fucked it up when editing for the front page. Sorry 'bout that.

Feryk
22nd June 10, 02:45 PM
McClaw, nice work!

Plate mail is next up? How long do you figure that will take?

resolve
22nd June 10, 02:48 PM
Decent job McClaw.

Have you learned steel forging yet?

TheMightyMcClaw
22nd June 10, 02:52 PM
Decent job McClaw.

Have you learned steel forging yet?

A bit; I took some blacksmithing classes, but I don't have the tools for it at home.
At the moment, I'm only planning on doing cold-rolled steel.

WarPhalange
22nd June 10, 03:09 PM
Once you get done with all this stuff, you really have to go and fight crime. It's a waste otherwise.

Ajamil
22nd June 10, 03:37 PM
I like the splintmail, but perhaps a bit more artisan next time. Did you cut and shape the pieces yourself? If so then great job, because they look like something you could buy at Home Depot, which I suppose if you crafted them would mean you crafted them well.

TheMightyMcClaw
22nd June 10, 03:37 PM
Once you get done with all this stuff, you really have to go and fight crime. It's a waste otherwise.

I doubt you'll be surprised to hear that you're not the first one to suggest this.

TheMightyMcClaw
22nd June 10, 03:45 PM
I like the splintmail, but perhaps a bit more artisan next time. Did you cut and shape the pieces yourself? If so then great job, because they look like something you could buy at Home Depot, which I suppose if you crafted them would mean you crafted them well.

Yep, I cut and punched them myself. If examine closely, there are slight irregularities in the width of them, which attests to the fact that this was my first time cutting sheet metal.

Adouglasmhor
22nd June 10, 04:22 PM
It's Lamellar or Brigandine not mail, mail is only made of rings.

TheMightyMcClaw
22nd June 10, 04:33 PM
It's Lamellar or Brigandine not mail, mail is only made of rings.

Splint armor would be the proper term, though if my sources are correct, "mail" used to be a general term for armor way back when.
This is sort of coming back into vogue via D&D and similar RPG's, wherein the term "mail" is used to refer to any type of flexible or segmented armor.
The term Lamellar I've only ever heard to refer to Chinese-style scale armor, in which plates are bound to one another.
Most of the brigandine I've seen has a layer of cloth or leather on either side of it, but other than that is pretty similar in construction to splint armor.

Adouglasmhor
22nd June 10, 04:57 PM
Mail was only chain and ring way back then. D & D and fantasy books invented the term and Chainmail is a 17th century revision. Forgotten realms books do not = sources.

Lammelar is used genericaly for up to and including Lorica Segmentae and Lorica Squamata , you are correct that in brigandine the plates are covered. But if the plates are only sewn on for some reason it is no longer scale.

Scale armour is also very correct.

Adouglasmhor
22nd June 10, 05:00 PM
Plus I helped make a mail coat and it is still on display in the museum on the Orkneys.
I also made and still have a secret I made (A steel scull cap to wear under a hat).

Cullion
22nd June 10, 06:51 PM
One step up from tinfoil, I guess.

Tyrsmann
22nd June 10, 06:53 PM
Mail was only chain and ring way back then. D & D and fantasy books invented the term and Chainmail is a 17th century revision. Forgotten realms books do not = sources.

Lammelar is used genericaly for up to and including Lorica Segmentae and Lorica Squamata , you are correct that in brigandine the plates are covered. But if the plates are only sewn on for some reason it is no longer scale.

Scale armour is also very correct.

teh correct

McClaw, one site that I think could be of use to you would be myarmoury.com.
If nothing else than to learn to historically correct terms. Having said that I am glad you've taken a step forward in being an armourer. The splints on the jacket look awesome and I envy your skill at metalwork.

Adouglasmhor
23rd June 10, 03:07 AM
One step up from tinfoil, I guess.

More ecology friendly - reusable.

DAYoung
23rd June 10, 03:13 AM
When supervillains plan their next super-society, spawned by he-men and he-women on a heavily-armed island, they think of McClaw, making love to McClaw, in armour.

WarPhalange
23rd June 10, 03:19 AM
I doubt you'll be surprised to hear that you're not the first one to suggest this.

Yes, but I meant going after businesses with bad accounting practices and people who lie while under oath.

TheMightyMcClaw
23rd June 10, 12:27 PM
Yes, but I meant going after businesses with bad accounting practices and people who lie while under oath.

I've considered storming one of those PayDay Advance places, all the while shouting quotes from the Bible about the sin of usery.

Wounded Ronin
23rd June 10, 11:35 PM
So, when will you be able to forge high quality swords like the ones available from Albion?

resolve
25th June 10, 04:03 AM
So, when will you be able to forge high quality swords like the ones available from Windlass Steelcrafts?

When he learns how to smithy proper.

You can actually set up a gas-powered smithy that takes up less space than your traditional coal based one, but costs more and with gas introduced there's always that extra danger factor involved. But you'd be surprised at how small a smithy can be with a gas setup.

Need heat-reflecting firestone, a gas oven and tank, anvil, coolant tanks (water, oil), forging hammers, pliers, and you are good to go.

You can buy tool-hard steel in pre-fab slabs that you can then work and temper to your desire.

One of the best ways to get tool-hard steel on the cheap is by uncoiling garage door springs (have to heat them up in the forge and use a stake and pliers to pull them out while hot). You can then heat up a pair of the thick spring wire and twist them together using clamp and pliers when heated. Then take the twisted wires and hot-forge them down into a thicker workable piece (where you'd be at the point if you had started with the pre-fab).

TheMightyMcClaw
25th June 10, 07:40 AM
When he learns how to smithy proper.

You can actually set up a gas-powered smithy that takes up less space than your traditional coal based one, but costs more and with gas introduced there's always that extra danger factor involved. But you'd be surprised at how small a smithy can be with a gas setup.

Need heat-reflecting firestone, a gas oven and tank, anvil, coolant tanks (water, oil), forging hammers, pliers, and you are good to go.

You can buy tool-hard steel in pre-fab slabs that you can then work and temper to your desire.

One of the best ways to get tool-hard steel on the cheap is by uncoiling garage door springs (have to heat them up in the forge and use a stake and pliers to pull them out while hot). You can then heat up a pair of the thick spring wire and twist them together using clamp and pliers when heated. Then take the twisted wires and hot-forge them down into a thicker workable piece (where you'd be at the point if you had started with the pre-fab).

This will probably come after I get my own welding gear in terms of metalworking, so it's a bit down the road.

Conde Koma
25th June 10, 06:09 PM
I doubt you'll be surprised to hear that you're not the first one to suggest this.

There are real superheroes out there, I'm sure you could get them to pay you some serious dough for this kind of gear.

TheMightyMcClaw
25th June 10, 09:58 PM
There are real superheroes out there, I'm sure you could get them to pay you some serious dough for this kind of gear.

I've considered making "self defense gloves" specifically marketed towards the RBSD crowd, but I'm not entirely sure if that's ethical.

Conde Koma
26th June 10, 12:05 AM
As our friend Money May says, "If it makes dollars, then it makes sense."

Chances are no one that buys it will ever have the chance to use it for anything but LARPing. Although if you're really afraid, you could make it out of some kind of soft, harmless metal or something.

Adouglasmhor
27th June 10, 04:17 AM
When he learns how to smithy proper.

You can actually set up a gas-powered smithy that takes up less space than your traditional coal based one, but costs more and with gas introduced there's always that extra danger factor involved. But you'd be surprised at how small a smithy can be with a gas setup.

Need heat-reflecting firestone, a gas oven and tank, anvil, coolant tanks (water, oil), forging hammers, pliers, and you are good to go.

You can buy tool-hard steel in pre-fab slabs that you can then work and temper to your desire.

One of the best ways to get tool-hard steel on the cheap is by uncoiling garage door springs (have to heat them up in the forge and use a stake and pliers to pull them out while hot). You can then heat up a pair of the thick spring wire and twist them together using clamp and pliers when heated. Then take the twisted wires and hot-forge them down into a thicker workable piece (where you'd be at the point if you had started with the pre-fab).

We used to used leaf springs from trailers and trucks to get our steel. Cut them then beat them to the shape you need.

Japuma
28th June 10, 12:13 AM
We used to used leaf springs from trailers and trucks to get our steel. Cut them then beat them to the shape you need.

Old saw blade are great for smaller projects, you just have to normalize them first.

Feryk
28th June 10, 04:18 PM
I've considered making "self defense gloves" specifically marketed towards the RBSD crowd, but I'm not entirely sure if that's ethical.

Self Defense Cestus?

Adouglasmhor
28th June 10, 04:41 PM
Old saw blade are great for smaller projects, you just have to normalize them first.


Any tool steel you can get and normalise is great, many a highland re-enactor roams the highlands with a dirk made out an old file.