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resolve
11th June 10, 02:25 AM
As the violence in Mexico spikes, four major drug cartels that are fighting each other for territory and smuggling routes may be forming alliances with each other.

Currently three cartels control most of the border region between the U.S. and Mexico. But the federation, or Sinaloa cartel, is fighting for a larger area of the border and may be negotiating a truce with the Gulf cartel.

Click here to see video on Housley's report on Mexico's cartels.

Fred Burton, vice president for counterterrorism and corporate security at Stratfor Global Security says it's not surprising these groups are trying to join forces.

"We've seen reports coming out of Mexico that cartels have set down and tried to do business together because of, let's face it, pressure. Whether that be law enforcement pressure or military pressure, (it) is bad for business."

The Sinaloa traditionally has used southern Arizona as its avenue to smuggle drugs into the United States. But these once-open borders have been shut down by U.S. Border Patrol agents, who have increased patrols and put up fences. Agents say it only makes sense that the Sinaloa cartel would fight for new territory and at the same time look for a new partner.

If the Sinaloa struck an alliance with the East Coast-based Gulf cartel it would gain another smuggling route into the United States and an important ally in the war against the Mexican military.

In the last two years, Mexico has deployed 50,000 Mexican troops and federal police officers along the northernmost regions in order to confront the drug cartels, after President Felipe Calderon pledged to tackle the growing problem. His strategy has been met with varying success.

President Obama said Wednesday that he was looking at possibly deploying National Guard troops to contain the violence, and the administration has been watching cartel movement closely.

"If they have to adapt their tactics, whether that means negotiating with another cartel, or whether it means giving up certain trafficking routes — which we have also seen — all of those are a reflection of effective strategy to pressure these cartels," said Deputy Assistant Secretary of State Roberta Jackson.

The drugs cartels are now claiming they have as many as 100,000 foot soldiers at their disposal — which include a growing number of deserters from the Mexican military. This has turned this conflict into what some experts call an evenly-matched fight. Others describe it as a propaganda battle.

"It's not particularly surprising to see them claiming thousands and thousands of people in their employ, so that they can try and frighten the population, intimidate people including the security forces against whom they are operating," Jackson said.

But Burton, who studies the unrest daily, said more disturbing than the sheer number of foot soldiers, is the cartels' firepower.

"I think the most frightening aspect of this, if you look at this, are not so much the numbers of 100,000. It's the tactical capabilities that the cartels have, for example in places like Reynosa when they are able to muster RPG's and law rockets."

Whether the cartels work together or not, the bloodshed in Mexico is expected to get worse, as the U.S. clamps down, secures border areas and tried to stem the flow of narcotics.

At the San Ysidro checkpoint near San Diego, Border Patrol agents seized some 700 pounds of cocaine from 2007 to 2008, a massive increase from under one pound the year before. And busts this year have continued to climb another 44 percent.

In some seized vehicles, agents discover drugs stuffed into every possible crevice by Mexico's powerful drug cartels. Cocaine is being found inside cassette and CD players, packed into fenders, even strapped around the engine. This is an indication that the traditional smuggling lanes are being redefined, and despite efforts to stem the flow, the drug war rages on.

"The creativity is just endless. If there is an empty void in that vehicle somewhere, I would imagine there is a smuggler out there looking to utilize that, to sneak contraband into this country," Rick Barlow of U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

Todd Hoffman, acting director of Customs and Border Protection field operations in San Diego said: "It's the whole balloon mentality with deeper concealments, that's what we've been seeing."

As new walls go up, the cartels are forced to find new routes north, which — in the case of cocaine — brings them back to where they started: the San Diego area. These smuggling routes, which had been used for years, were abandoned in favor of easier ways into the U.S.

"A lot of them originated in San Diego. Their roots are in San Diego and as we gain control of the border across the nation, I think some of these smuggling operations are coming back to their roots. Coming back to the San Diego area. This is home to them," said Barlow.

Back home — of sorts — because of the crackdown on once wide open areas of the border in eastern California, southern Arizona and New Mexico are closing up.

And it's not just what's coming north, but what the American drug demand is shipping south. Last year Mexican immigrants sent remittances home totaling about $25 billion dollars, while estimates of drug money flowing south to the cartels total up to $39 billion dollars, many times in large bundles of cash.

Federal agents say better training, intelligence and scanning equipment has helped them crackdown on smuggling in both directions. The Mexican government tells Fox News they are also trying to increase their enforcement, while at the same time battling the cartels for control along the San Diego border.



It's almost funny that one of the worst places in Mexico, Reynosa, is right across the border from the US. My sister who was doing missions work down there told me about all the crazy human trafficking and child prostitution in that area. And of course it's completely packed with drug cartel presence now. Sad :-/

I'm glad to see the Mexican government has finally decided to ramp up their aggression against the cartels along the border region.

Dr. Socially Liberal Fiscally Conservative Vermin
11th June 10, 06:11 AM
If there wasnt such a crazy drug pollicey in the US, do you thinjk the cartels would exist?

SFGOON
11th June 10, 09:28 AM
Be more specific Maximilian.

What portion of the UCSA do you find to be crazy?

Dr. Socially Liberal Fiscally Conservative Vermin
11th June 10, 11:03 AM
Keeping cocaine illegal.

Ajamil
11th June 10, 03:15 PM
I dreadfully anticipate this will be the next war America fights on it's own soil. I'm glad STEEV in Phoenix is far enough away from the border that he probably won't be caught in the crossfire.

BadUglyMagic
11th June 10, 04:22 PM
I dreadfully anticipate this will be the next war America fights on it's own soil. I'm glad STEEV in Phoenix is far enough away from the border that he probably won't be caught in the crossfire.

You would have to define what you meant by "war". The US has already been invaded by millions of mexican nationals. Mexico wins this war by receiving the remittances of those illegal invaders without having incurred the costs of a military conflict. In this case the US has lost.


Arizona or significat parts of it are expected to end up as Mexican controlled territory sometime within the next 35-40 years.

More interesting is the answer to the question"What is the percentage of Hispanic/latino inmates in the New Mexico, Arizona, and South Texas prisons?". Of those, how many are illegal aliens?

ICY
11th June 10, 04:53 PM
US drug laws are fucked. Criminals give money to politicians that keep drugs illegal, so the profit margins stay high.

The Cartels will re-establish their sway over the authorities. It is inevitable.

elipson
11th June 10, 08:01 PM
I'm glad to see the Mexican government has finally decided to ramp up their aggression against the cartels along the border region.

Finally??? You're new to this topic aren't you.

This has been going on for the past three years, and the violence has gotten worse each year.

I was expecting that article to talk about the cartel Los Zetas, who are one of the most brutal and ambitious cartels at the moment. The other cartels have actually discussed working together to fight the Zetas and have even gone so far as to ask the government to back off and let them handle the Zetas. The Gulf Cartel is in its death throes, with most of its territory being over-run by the Zetas, who they themselves created.

Where did you get the article btw? From it's bias I'd say a conservative US paper.

Wounded Ronin
11th June 10, 08:21 PM
GAIZ THEY GOT THE RPGS FROM GUN STORES IN EL PASO, TEXAS.

Ajamil
12th June 10, 07:11 AM
You would have to define what you meant by "war". The US has already been invaded by millions of mexican nationals. Mexico wins this war by receiving the remittances of those illegal invaders without having incurred the costs of a military conflict. In this case the US has lost.This has nothing to do with war IMO. Mexican illegals almost always come over to work (I will grant the number that come over as parts of a gang). They aren't sneaking across with the specific intent to kill law enforcement or generally attack the populace.


Arizona or significat parts of it are expected to end up as Mexican controlled territory sometime within the next 35-40 years.
Nonsense. There is national pride in Mexican immigrants, but they aren't stooges and they wouldn't start obeying remote commands from the Mexican government. Did you mean the majority of the general population in those parts of the US would be mainly of Mexican ethnicity?


More interesting is the answer to the question"What is the percentage of Hispanic/latino inmates in the New Mexico, Arizona, and South Texas prisons?". Of those, how many are illegal aliens?
Inmates with immigration holds in California, from Crime Report (http://thecrimereport.org/2010/01/27/13-percent-of-california-prisoners-subject-to-immigration-hold/)

Following up on California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger’s suggestion on Monday to build a prison in Mexico, the Sacramento Bee researched the numbers of immigrant inmates. It found that as of Dec. 31, California prisons had 22,173 inmates with an immigration hold or potential immigration hold. That represented 13 percent of the state’s 168,830 inmates. The paper said 15,124 of the 22,173 inmates self-identified as Mexican natives, equal to 68.2 percent.

NY Times (http://www.nytimes.com/1997/04/20/us/with-jail-costs-rising-arizona-wants-to-build-private-prison-in-mexico.html?pagewanted=1) with a broader overview

On the state level, Mexicans account for 9.5 percent of the 145,000 inmates in California and 10.5 percent of the 22,697 inmates in Arizona. Over the last five years, the number of Mexicans jailed in Arizona has jumped 72 percent, double the 36 percent rate of increase for the state's prison population as a whole.

Statistics are always a fun game, but it gives a general idea.

resolve
14th June 10, 09:31 PM
Where did you get the article btw? From it's bias I'd say a conservative US paper.

YAHOO! News.

I haven't read a paper in a while since the "articles" started reading like opinion columns.

BadUglyMagic
14th June 10, 10:15 PM
I don't know hoe to define war in this context and as afaik, this has nothing to do with war. Mexican illegal aliens almost always come over to work (except for those who come over to traffic women and children as laborers and prostitutes or gang members trafficking drugs and setting up dealer distribution networks. Not all of them are sneaking across with the specific intent to kill law enforcement or commit criminal acts against the populace. Just some of them.


Nonsense you Mexican hating racist. There is national pride in Mexican ILLEGAL ALIENS, but they aren't AMERICAN CITIZENS and it is fair that they don't start obeying American Laws or become American citizens because they are MEXICANS working in another country.



Fixed for you.


Pssst, California is not part of Texas, New Mexico or Arizona. The current population count of the California prison system is said to run north of 150,000. Closer to 165,000.

The US-Mexico political-economic dynamic is much more than poor Pedro looking for work.

Georgia spends close to 20 million a year incarcerating illegal aliens convicted of criminal acts. To bad we can't spend the money on health insurance coverage or medical care to the state's needy children and elderly.

Ajamil
14th June 10, 10:51 PM
Attempting to fix by yourself voids warranty. You asked questions, I gave answers that give a general idea. Did you miss the part on Arizona? By all means supply your own data. Are you saying California doesn't have a problem with illegal Mexican immigrants?

Of course the situation is more than "poor Pedro looking for work" (lovely words, BTW). I wonder why Georgia has all those illegal immigrants in the first place? I bet all the business owners just hate that, and wish they would go away so they could hire hard working US citizens.

How much does Georgia spend on crime that isn't committed by illegal immigrants? (http://thecrimereport.org/2010/05/29/high-ga-prison-budget-threatens-education-other-budgets/)

...a prison budget that consumes more than $1 billion a year... $20 million doesn't seem like much comparatively. And Georgia spends less than most states.

Since you mention human trafficking, do you think illegal immigrants are more often the perpetrators, or the victims of such crimes? Sure makes it easy to avoid having your housemaid slave tattle to the cops if it'll get him/her deported.

EvilSteve
15th June 10, 12:02 PM
US drug laws are fucked. Criminals give money to politicians that keep drugs illegal, so the profit margins stay high.

The Cartels will re-establish their sway over the authorities. It is inevitable.

By and large drugs are still illegal because not enough old people have died yet. Younger folks are generally in favor of legalization. However, a combination of older voters who oppose that and politicians not willing to go on record advocating the legalization of what has been touted as a major threat to this country's youth are enough to keep them illegal for the foreseeable future.

Yes, it is most certainly to the advantage of criminals, the CIA, "tough on crime" politicians (most GOP), pro gun-control politicians (most Dems), and any president needing a quick distraction from a failing domestic policy (most) to keep drugs illegal, but in this case if the electorate would just speak the fuck up this problem could probably be solved.

That and if Mexico would just STOP BEING SO FUCKING POOR!

BadUglyMagic
15th June 10, 01:46 PM
Attempting to fix by yourself voids warranty. You asked questions, I gave answers that give a general idea.

There was a warranty?

California was not part of my comment, to include it (with the exception of 1 line about Arizona) answers some other question, incorrectly as your "statistic'' understated the inmate count by 15,000.



Are you saying California doesn't have a problem with illegal Mexican immigrants?

Southern California is also expected to be absorbed into Mexico. But for the purpose of my comments and directed questions regarding the Mexican drug cartels it was not included.



I wonder why Georgia has all those illegal immigrants in the first place?

Georgia has had a consistently strong economy for the last 30 or so years, even through most economic downturns. Construction had provided a basic economic stimulator that spread out into the rest of the economy and kept it running despite national economic problems. Also, Atlanta is the major distribution hub for the southeast.

The illegals originally came for construction work but as supply outran demand they shifted into other areas. Look up Gainesville, Georgia
and the poultry industry for a look at the lower end of the payoff for illegal aliens.

They are here because the federal government and then the state governments have failed to maintain the state for the citizens. This failure to maintain the state of the union has allowed the various drug cartels and human traffickers to act with relative impunity.

The fact that the drug cartels are using nation building strategies and tactics as part of the control arm of the drug network should come as no surprise. That illegal aliens are a large part of that effort should come as even less.





How much does Georgia spend on crime that isn't committed by illegal immigrants? (http://thecrimereport.org/2010/05/29/high-ga-prison-budget-threatens-education-other-budgets/)

$20 million doesn't seem like much comparatively. And Georgia spends less than most states.

Who cares? It is 20 million dollars that could be spent by the state to better the health and welfare of its citizens (including green card holders). $20 million for underpriveleged children and elderly for health care, for disease prevention , or for nutrition programs. That is just Georgia.



Since you mention human trafficking, do you think illegal immigrants are more often the perpetrators, or the victims of such crimes? Sure makes it easy to avoid having your housemaid slave tattle to the cops if it'll get him/her deported.



Do you really believe that all female Mexican illegal aliens work as domestics?


Mexican women and children are trafficked in to the US by organized groups of Mexicans for prostitution the same way Chinese women are trafficked by Chinese groups. Groups of these Mexican enslavers and sex slaves follow the migrant workers around the US or they may be held captive in houses. This includes California. It includes Pennsylvania.

Ajamil
15th June 10, 04:22 PM
There was a warranty?Sure, why not? Nice post.


California was not part of my comment, to include it (with the exception of 1 line about Arizona) answers some other question, incorrectly as your "statistic'' understated the inmate count by 15,000.

Southern California is also expected to be absorbed into Mexico. But for the purpose of my comments and directed questions regarding the Mexican drug cartels it was not included.Fair enough. Can you give some stats on illegal immigrants in the mentioned states?


The illegals originally came for construction work but as supply outran demand they shifted into other areas. Look up Gainesville, Georgia
and the poultry industry for a look at the lower end of the payoff for illegal aliens.Why do you say construction was first and not the fields? Where did this info come from?


Who cares? It is 20 million dollars that could be spent by the state to better the health and welfare of its citizens (including green card holders). $20 million for underpriveleged children and elderly for health care, for disease prevention , or for nutrition programs. That is just Georgia.I think the $20 million dollars would go into enforcing the borders and keeping the illegal immigrants out, instead of keeping them in jail.


Do you really believe that all female Mexican illegal aliens work as domestics?I didn't say that anywhere. In fact I specifically chose to start with the masculine pronoun. I know that seeing a lady chained to a bed is a more obvious sign of human trafficking than a man trimming the hedges of an estate. I'd say check out The Slave Next Door (http://www.ucpress.edu/book.php?isbn=9780520255159), but it sounds like you've read either this book or one very similar already.



Mexican women and children are trafficked in to the US by organized groups of Mexicans for prostitution the same way Chinese women are trafficked by Chinese groups. Groups of these Mexican enslavers and sex slaves follow the migrant workers around the US or they may be held captive in houses. This includes California. It includes Pennsylvania.Yes. A common tactic is debts that are impossible to pay off, and withholding passports and other ID.

BadUglyMagic
15th June 10, 08:15 PM
Why do you say construction was first and not the fields? Where did this info come from?


Fields? HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA! Maybe onions in Vidalia. Other than that HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

Research moar!



I think the $20 million dollars would go into enforcing the borders and keeping the illegal immigrants out, instead of keeping them in jail.



Georgia does not border Mexico. The $20 million is for Georgia only. It would be racial profiling and illegal to stop them at the state borders of the Carolinas.




I know that seeing a lady chained to a bed is a more obvious sign of human trafficking than a man trimming the hedges of an estate.


Yes, because in the southeast there are only estates and plantations. Illegal aliens currently make up the largest employed group in landscaping and groundskeeping businesses. The owners of many of these are alleged to be illegal aliens also. Georgia has a number of former illegal aliens who are millionaires today. Not as emotional as the mental picture of poor Pedro trimming hedges for the massa though.



and withholding passports and other ID.

Passports? HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!


I like your sense of humor.

Ajamil
15th June 10, 10:07 PM
You're not worth the time it takes to wade through your trolling. I don't ask questions to hear your opinions of information. Shall we start over? What has you saying construction was first?

BadUglyMagic
16th June 10, 09:00 AM
You're not worth the time it takes to wade through your trolling. I don't ask questions to hear your opinions of information. Shall we start over? What has you saying construction was first?


What you were serious? And trolling?

If it not worth the time, then it is not worth the time.

resolve
16th June 10, 02:18 PM
What I think is a funny scenario...

Mexicans that come here legally to escape Mexico's shitty economy just might be having trouble getting high enough paying jobs to support their families because illegals will take alot less due to Mexico's shitty economy.

Ajamil
16th June 10, 04:30 PM
I wasn't trolling. Would you like to show the percentages of illegal immigrants incarcerated in places like Texas and Arizona? Would you like to explain why you said construction was first in Georgia? And yes, passports, or other forms of ID, are withheld as a way to effectively enslave people. Do you think legal immigrants don't have passports?