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View Full Version : Blood Sausage. Black Pudding. Boudin Noir. Blutwurst.



Cullion
4th April 10, 04:46 PM
This thread is about the delights of blood sausage. I'm going to talk about the variants I've personally tried (from the British Isles), but this thread isn't just about those versions. It's a very widespread phenomenon, with a lot of variations to pick your favourite from, all around the globe.

Doug and I have both posted enthusiastically about British Isles 'black pudding' as a part of a nourishing cooked breakfast. Some North Americans here have been skeptical, some curious and willing to experiment.

Well, what is it ?

In the most common British Isles variety, Black pudding is boiled pig's blood in a length of intestine. (yes it's Klingon food. Shut up until you've tried it at least once, faggot).

In the UK our puddings are usually bound with cereal, or with suet or cubes of fat added. European puddings are lighter because they are often made with cream instead of cereals.

Now, that might sound off-putting if you haven't grown up with it. It's ok, I understand that. This is a picture of what it looks like uncooked:-

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_KgIqQvYUs3I/SftBc8d1UCI/AAAAAAAANEY/iOUrVc5Hl3w/s400/Black+Pudding.jpg

See? It's just a dark sausage

Beyond this basic description, the variety of different fillers and spices used is enormous, even within the UK. Oatmeal, suet, bits of potato or onion, lumps of delicious, delicious animal fat, herbs, garlic, red wine, stout.. All kinds of stuff finds it's way in.

Now, as Dougie will know, the best Black Pudding in the world to have with a British cooked breakfast comes from the North of England, from Pigs blood, oats, barley, onion, sage and thyme and is oven dried instead of boiled to concentrate the meaty flavour.

Cooked as an accompaniment with seared scallops, it looks like this:-

http://files.stv.tv/img/articles/88795-taste-the-nation-recipes-seared-scallops-on-pan-fried-black-pudding-thursday-april-16-200.jpg

I'll let Dougie talk to you about the lesser celtic, but still worthy, versions of this English dish as they are made in Stornaway and Clonakilty. Later on we'll talk about France, Poland, Germany and other countries.

danno
4th April 10, 06:35 PM
tip top!

the texture is unlike anything else. if you're a little disturbed by the ingredients, try really hard to be objective about how it tastes. forget there is blood in it.

besides, we all eat animal products anyway. this is just another one.

Cullion
4th April 10, 06:47 PM
Tell us all about the black puddings you can get down below.

Ajamil
4th April 10, 06:50 PM
besides, we all eat animal products anyway. this is just another one.

Uhm...

Anyway, you make a good case, and it sounds like something all omnivores should try.

danno
4th April 10, 07:00 PM
Tell us all about the black puddings you can get down below.

i really doubt it's eaten as often here. but you can get it from quite a few butchers.

i've generally got it from the supermarket, you can buy it in any of them. i forget which brand it is.

the black pudding i've had is very rich, and both moist and crumbly at the same time. you can't eat a large amount of it.

HappyOldGuy
4th April 10, 07:06 PM
It's almost unheard of here. I think I've had it once, and it's the sort of thing I will order if it's available. (I heart heart, plus kidneys, liver, and prety much all the guts) Sadly, my countrymen do not agree at all. Even my yuppy butcher usually only has liver.

Kein Haar
4th April 10, 07:50 PM
I don't think I've ever seen it available anywhere.

I would certainly try it.

Is this currently considered a peasant food? Or is it kinda expensive?

DAYoung
4th April 10, 08:15 PM
Cullion, if I make it to England, I want you to serve me (or treat me to) fine black pudding.

And, yes, I mean the food.

danno
4th April 10, 08:48 PM
have you tried it before? would you consider popping down to your local butcher for some?

Ajamil
4th April 10, 08:48 PM
My favorites were hearts and gizzards. I never had a taste for liver - too dry and grainy, and the idea of eating something that filtered poison...

Phrost
4th April 10, 09:07 PM
Cullion, if I make it to England, I want you to serve me (or treat me to) fine black pudding.


x2. And we'll jaunt north for some haggis.

Can't get anything like that here.

DAYoung
4th April 10, 09:50 PM
I have had haggis, as a kid. I enjoyed it. Very flavoursome.

littleoldme
5th April 10, 03:04 AM
I <3 black pudding and eat it at least once a week to keep my iron levels up.

I like it fried on a bed of watercress with gooseberry conserve and lashings of balsamic vinegar.

mmmmm

I love chicken livers too, also on watercress with a sause of balsamic vinegar, marsala wine and freshly squeezed OJ

*salivates*

DAYoung
5th April 10, 03:36 AM
I <3 black pudding and eat it at least once a week to keep my iron levels up.

I like it fried on a bed of watercress with gooseberry conserve and lashings of balsamic vinegar.

http://i655.photobucket.com/albums/uu273/Zorro412/captain-picard-full-of-win.jpg

Cullion
5th April 10, 05:01 AM
I don't think I've ever seen it available anywhere.

I would certainly try it.

Is this currently considered a peasant food? Or is it kinda expensive?

It's enjoyed by all social classes as part of a full cooked breakfast. You could order an English cooked breakfast in the Ritz, or a trucker's cafe, made from pretty much the same ingredients. Certain things cross class boundaries. Only the Scottish would serve it deep fried in batter though.

It's also sometimes found as part of a more upmarket meal, say as an accompaniment to fried scallops, or a more expensive pork fillet.

It's not expensive.

Cullion
5th April 10, 05:02 AM
I'll certainly serve a full English breakfast with black pudding to any sociocider who shows up at Chez Cullion.

Adouglasmhor
5th April 10, 06:01 AM
My mum has used it to stuff poultry. A workmate has it on his sarnies for work with rhubarb jam.

There is a veggie version but I have never tasted it.

You get a long deep fried version in batter from Scottish chip shops.

Another blood sausage from Ireland which has milk curds in it as well is called drisheen (pronounce the I as an O for some reason). different texture again smoother and possiby more like the continental versions mention by Cullion above.

South of Northumbria and Cumbria lumps of suet contaminate the puddings of the British isles solid black is the best time.


Oh and the Chinese make a vesrion which is called Blood Tofu.

Cullion
5th April 10, 06:08 AM
Drisheen uses breadcrumbs instead of oats or barley as filler. It's also often made with sheep's instead of pig's blood (or a mix).

Adouglasmhor
5th April 10, 06:08 AM
Only the Scottish would serve it deep fried in batter though.

We would serve anything deep fried in batter or even better as pakora.

The long lamented Murphys pakora bar did a pakora'd full cooked breakfast including black pudding.

Cullion
5th April 10, 06:12 AM
Can't get anything like that here.

It's because your food standards agency is worried about BSE (despite allowing your own livestock farmers to carry on doing the things we've now banned in response to the problem). It was the spinal tissue which was the risk anyway. There's no reason why that would have to get into a haggis.

Somebody should start making haggis from American sheep to get around this.

Cullion
5th April 10, 06:13 AM
We would serve anything deep fried in batter or even better as pakora.

The long lamented Murphys pakora bar did a pakora'd full cooked breakfast including black pudding.

<makes the sign of the cross>

We need to rebuild that wall.

Toby Christensen
26th April 10, 02:42 AM
I've had lamb's brains in mustard.

I don't mind really well done liver either.

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
26th April 10, 02:46 AM
What is haggis like Cullion? Are there any meats with a similar taste or texture?

Toby Christensen
26th April 10, 02:55 AM
The deep fried mars bar is the king of all comfort foods, oh brethren, the KING!
*gets a bit teary*

Cullion
26th April 10, 04:52 AM
What is haggis like Cullion? Are there any meats with a similar taste or texture?

A Haggis is basically just a big organ-meat (sheep's heart, liver and lung) sausage. It reminds me of slightly peppery sausage meat with lot of grain in it (there's a lot of oatmeal and barley in there). The texture reminds me a bit of the stuffing you might have with a Christmas turkey, and it looks a bit like it too:-

(big image)

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/ae/Haggis,_neeps_an_tatties.jpg

Dr. Socially Liberal Fiscally Conservative Vermin
26th April 10, 09:05 AM
I prefer the Spanish version morcilla http://spanishfood.about.com/od/sausages/a/morcillaintro.htm

But dont mind good british black pudding. Unifortunatly there are some pretty ofal ones (see what i did there?)

Toby Christensen
26th April 10, 10:46 PM
A butcher in Brisbane sells it amongst his stuff.

AND Scotch Eggs, for instance.

honesty
27th April 10, 02:57 AM
My favorites were hearts and gizzards. I never had a taste for liver - too dry and grainy, and the idea of eating something that filtered poison...

Liver is fantastic cooked in gravy with onions, served with mash potatoes.

I am surprised you cant get these things in the US. How do you go about getting a good steak and kidney pie??

My wife cant stand black pudding, but loves Hogs pudding - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hog's_pudding

Very nice, but I still prefer black pudding.

Cullion
27th April 10, 03:01 AM
I think butchers and supermarket chains in the US still tend to work on the premise that Americans think organ meats are 'icky' and don't know how to cook them.

honesty
27th April 10, 03:19 AM
A lot of these dishes need suet (like some black and white puddings, faggots etc.) and I seem to remember that its really bloody hard to get suet in the US as well. Is this true?

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
27th April 10, 03:21 AM
I think butchers and supermarket chains in the US still tend to work on the premise that Americans think organ meats are 'icky' and don't know how to cook them.

Vons = steak, different type of steak, third different type of steak, some chicken and fish
Azn market = ox tails and chicken feet and crazy fish that look like they were dredged from the bottom of the ocean
Sand negro market = goat and goat tongues and sheep heads

Neildo
27th April 10, 03:45 AM
you can get all kinds of crazy organ meats, haggis, blood sausage, etc here but that's probably because of the high concentration of european immigrants. tons of brits and scots in vancouver, and an oddly increasing number of irish.

i've never been a big fan of organ meat even though i know it's got more nutrients and minerals than the muscle. my dad (filipino) loves himself some liver and onions with gravy n mash though. i'll just have a couple of bangers, thanks.

Neildo
27th April 10, 03:46 AM
arg i want some pub food now. i could totally go for a pie n chips.

Kiko
28th April 10, 05:30 AM
One of my brothers-in-law is from Penn-Dutch country. I recall someone saying his family cooked stuff with organ meats so it's probably something more common in a rural/farming society vs the 'modern' supermarket lunacy we're into now.

We only put meat and spices into it, but when I was a kid my family made fresh Polish sausage for holidays and usually a good portion of it would be smoked.

Cullion
28th April 10, 07:10 AM
We didn't lose our love of kidney, liver, bloodsausage, haggis etc.. with the advent of supermarkets. I wonder why Americans did ?

Kiko
28th April 10, 07:11 AM
Marketing?

Cullion
28th April 10, 08:55 AM
I don't understand why would American farmers or stores want to stop you buying parts of the animal ? That would just mean they can't sell as much of each animal.

If you made your money selling sheep and cows, would you try and persuade people not to buy the livers, kidneys etc.. from you?

Adouglasmhor
28th April 10, 11:07 AM
They blend them up and put them in other things, You eat a sausage you're not eating the prime cuts of an animal, same for pies, some deli meats etc. etc.

Kein Haar
28th April 10, 11:48 AM
Mexicans and stuff still eat the wierd parts.

I eat the occasional beef tongue, and liver.

Actually, one problem I see is that these organ meats are pretty expensive. It is not exactly a bargain to get tongue and ox tails. Not at all.

Liver is cheap, though.

Maybe it's sold in major bulk to make sausage and pet foods or something, like he said. Doesn't get a chance to trickle down to the little people.

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
28th April 10, 02:39 PM
Farming is so subsidized in the USA that I wouldn't be surprised if they just made steaks and like, dumped all the guts in Lake Superior or something. If we ate the organ meats we'd be too full to eat the rest of the cows they overproduced.

Another theory: mystery meat in elementary schools

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
28th April 10, 02:40 PM
If we started eating the organ meat what would we feed the cows?

HappyOldGuy
28th April 10, 02:42 PM
Hopefully soon we will actually pass a law so that we only feed our cows a vegetarian diet. Like they have in most of the civilized world.

Vegetarians are high in vitamin e, which is good for a growing veal.

Cullion
28th April 10, 02:45 PM
If we started eating the organ meat what would we feed the cows?

Mexicans. Save those cops in Arizona a lot of time too.

Toby Christensen
29th April 10, 03:37 AM
[quote=

Another theory: mystery meat in elementary schools[/quote]

Well, provided it passed hygiene and standards, why not?

Australia needs school lunches back again.

Ajamil
29th April 10, 04:52 AM
Did you eat school lunches? I saved the money my parents gave me and bummed fries off the other kids.

Cullion
29th April 10, 06:25 AM
I bought cigarettes.

honesty
29th April 10, 07:39 AM
I bought cake. From this bakery: http://www.birdsbakery.com/
Humm, best caramel doughnuts ever.

Kiko
29th April 10, 01:34 PM
I'd guess quite a few parts of critters get put into food for other critters.... Pups and kitties gotta eat, don't they?

Kein Haar
30th April 10, 02:09 AM
Call me crazy, but I really enjoyed eating food at midday during my school years.

tao.jonez
30th April 10, 03:17 PM
I'd guess quite a few parts of critters get put into food for other critters.... Pups and kitties gotta eat, don't they?

Nailed it.

Why do you think dog food smells so gamey? It's the offal.

Also the blood gets dried out and used as fertilizer. Bone too, actually.

The profit margin for beef isn't that great even with US subsidies to cattle ranchers, so they don't waste much at all.

And going backwards in the thread, you can get pretty much any of the foods from this thread in the US if you know where to shop. There are botique farms and butchers that make haggis, blood sausages, liver mush, souse / headcheese, aspics, etc. It's all relatively expensive, but generally organic and non-GMO.

Cullion
30th April 10, 03:30 PM
I read somewhere that the haggis currently being made in the US didn't include lung?

The ban on importing Scottish haggis was lifted at the end of January this year btw:-

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/americas-long--wait-for-haggis-may-be-over-1877936.html