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Cullion
19th February 10, 05:46 PM
This is a surveillance drone as used in the UK by law enforcement. I bet the American version has an underslung grenade launcher on it or something:-

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2010/02/11/article-1250177-083FFB7D000005DC-938_634x450.jpg

Lights Out
19th February 10, 05:50 PM
Looks expensive and easily breakeable (that is, double expensive).

Your taxes at work.

Seriously, they seem to have designed that... thing with the sole purpose of pissing you off: 1984-style surveillance+more tax spending.

Cullion
19th February 10, 05:53 PM
Yes. It's just to fuck with our minds. I've decided that the entire UK is now a much larger version of 'the Island' depicted in 'The Prisoner'. I'm going to start referring to Gordon Brown as 'number 2' from now on.

Zendetta
19th February 10, 05:59 PM
Yes. It's just to fuck with our minds. I've decided that the entire UK is now a much larger version of 'the Island' depicted in 'The Prisoner'. I'm going to start referring to Gordon Brown as 'number 2' from now on.

Currently, we have some laws that ostensibly prevent unwarranted surveillance, but I'm sure they will get around them in due time.

Be seeing you...

HappyOldGuy
19th February 10, 05:59 PM
Not that I know of.

Know where I can buy one?

Cullion
19th February 10, 06:00 PM
I thought the Patriot Acts already ripped through that like a hymen on prom night ?

SoulMechanic
19th February 10, 06:07 PM
No we have guns and police dogs. I really want to believe that your nifty bobby chopper was stolen from the front page of the onion.

Zendetta
19th February 10, 06:08 PM
I thought the Patriot Acts already ripped through that like a hymen on prom night ?

If they can tar you the terr'rist brush, I'm sure that's true.

An example of what I'm talking about: the cops are pretty sure you are growing marijuana, but they don't yet have anything that would convince a judge to give them permission to conduct surveillance.

They would love to send a 'copter with an infrared camera to scan your house for the obvious tell-tale heat signature, but they can't conduct surveillance on you without first jumping thru the hoops.

In other words, they will simply have to lie to the judge that an "anonymous informant" saw weed plants at your house. Since said informant is anonymous, who knows whether he exists or not?

Then they get permission to fly over and record the thermal evidence. Once they have that, they can get a search warrant, kick down your door, shoot your dog, etc etc.

Cullion
19th February 10, 06:11 PM
No we have guns and police dogs. I really want to believe that your nifty bobby chopper was stolen from the front page of the onion.

No, it's completely real and in use.

Zendetta, our own version of the Patriot Acts, most of them sold as 'anti-Terrorism laws' have been used for all kinds of things that really have nothing to do with terrorism. America still has better safeguards though, by the look of it.

Zendetta
19th February 10, 06:18 PM
Zendetta, our own version of the Patriot Acts, most of them sold as 'anti-Terrorism laws' have been used for all kinds of things that really have nothing to do with terrorism.

That would never happen in America!!!!

During the height of post 9/11 madness, the FBI was considering living rooms gatherings of anti-iraq war baby-boomers to be "potential terrorist organizations". So, yeah, we got that too.

That's what I was trying to imply: you don't have to be a terrorist to get tarred with that brush.

I suspect that you share my fear that in the coming years/months/weeks, plenty of legit people and organizations that do not fit into the mainstream mindset will find themselves on Fascism Cam. Its a social control strategy straight out of Orwell.

Commodore Pipes
19th February 10, 06:20 PM
No, it's completely real and in use.

Zendetta, our own version of the Patriot Acts, most of them sold as 'anti-Terrorism laws' have been used for all kinds of things that really have nothing to do with terrorism. America still has better safeguards though, by the look of it.

For now. Every generation that grows up with such things as 'normal' doesn't mind if their 'leaders' leach a few more liberties away. I'm worried that is the true legacy of the Patriot Act.

Cullion
19th February 10, 06:20 PM
I'm probably already on a database somewhere. Fuck 'em.

Lights Out
19th February 10, 06:24 PM
By the way Cullion paints it, the UK seems to be turning into a living nightmare.

Heard complaints about that in the papers and such, but labelled it as exaggerations.

Now I'm questioning my judgement on the issue...

Zendetta
19th February 10, 06:32 PM
Cullion, this should give you some sense of the "flavour" of things over here.

Admittedly, its from my home state of South Carolina, which is more retarded than most of the rest of the country, but its a nice snapshot of "wrapped in the american flag"-style fascism.


The state's "Subversive Activities Registration Act," passed last year and now officially on the books, states that "every member of a subversive organization, or an organization subject to foreign control, every foreign agent and every person who advocates, teaches, advises or practices the duty, necessity or propriety of controlling, conducting, seizing or overthrowing the government of the United States ... shall register with the Secretary of State."

By "subversive organization," the law means "every corporation, society, association, camp, group, bund, political party, assembly, body or organization, composed of two or more persons, which directly or indirectly advocates, advises, teaches or practices the duty, necessity or propriety of controlling, conducting, seizing or overthrowing the government of the United States [or] of this State."

Bold is mine.

http://rawstory.com/2010/02/south-carolinas-subversive-activities-registration-act-force/

Cullion
19th February 10, 06:32 PM
LO, it depends what you're used to, how much memory you have of the country being different, what you do for a living and where in the UK you live.

It's still quite possible to be happy here, but there's a steady trend towards the state becoming more heavy-handed, bureacratic and officious (whilst being simultaneously less competent and more wasteful with public money) which is apparent almost everywhere.

But the more extreme examples like surveillance drones and police officers breaking into people's homes and then lecturing them about how they should lock their doors and windows at night are things that tend to happen in poor urban areas.

HappyOldGuy
19th February 10, 06:46 PM
http://vlex.com/vid/sec-certain-organizations-19190034

I'm not disagreeing that it's shitty.

I'm just pointing out it's not even slightly new.

Lights Out
19th February 10, 06:52 PM
LO, it depends what you're used to, how much memory you have of the country being different, what you do for a living and where in the UK you live.

It's still quite possible to be happy here, but there's a steady trend towards the state becoming more heavy-handed, bureacratic and officious (whilst being simultaneously less competent and more wasteful with public money) are apparent almost everywhere.

But the more extreme examples like surveillance drones and police officers breaking into people's homes and then lecturing them about how they should lock their doors and windows at night are things that tend to happen in poor urban areas.

Let me elaborate a bit more more in order to try to appear a bit less of a moron and explain myself better. Here's my take on the issue:

A couple of years ago, I began to notice news on the papers about people in the UK complaining about certain security meassures which were being implemented, such as surveillance cameras on the streets.

I lived in Madrid for some years, and it is hard to walk by certain places without seing cameras placed everywhere. Tehre's a lot of official buildings and such, and having our own domestic terrorism problem, it was somehow justified. Also, the whole subway net and short distance trains are also high on cameras.

So, basically, I am accustomed to see surveillance cameras almost everywhere.

Knowing how anglosaxons value their privacy (I'd say more than spaniards), and seeing how Orwell's name and work was thrown here and there, I labelled that under some over-reaction to common security meassures.

But after reading about police officers breaking into homes to "test how protected they are" and that Cullionpissercopter thing... well, it makes me question about the posible hidden agenda beyond that meassures.

As a side note, years ago some people complained here about security cameras placed on offical buildings, so it is now mandatory that those cameras cannot point further than the pretended spot they are supposed to take care. That is, you cannot place security camres in a way that they record further than the nearest building surroundings.

And if police tried to do that bullshit of breaking into homes, well, the politician who supported it would be in for a heap of trouble.

BadUglyMagic
19th February 10, 08:30 PM
This is a surveillance drone as used in the UK by law enforcement. I bet the American version has an underslung grenade launcher on it or something:-

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2010/02/11/article-1250177-083FFB7D000005DC-938_634x450.jpg



It omly has a range of 1500 feet? Wow. The police got lucky.

Ours look different. In fact there is a huge contest each year for that type of platform. You can buy that or something similar on the internet or through a hobby shop. Walmart sells these things. Only cheaper.

Some company was floating their use for crowd control using tear gas. Basically a floating wall type of thing.

Adouglasmhor
20th February 10, 04:56 AM
If they can tar you the terr'rist brush, I'm sure that's true.

An example of what I'm talking about: the cops are pretty sure you are growing marijuana, but they don't yet have anything that would convince a judge to give them permission to conduct surveillance.

They would love to send a 'copter with an infrared camera to scan your house for the obvious tell-tale heat signature, but they can't conduct surveillance on you without first jumping thru the hoops.

In other words, they will simply have to lie to the judge that an "anonymous informant" saw weed plants at your house. Since said informant is anonymous, who knows whether he exists or not?

Then they get permission to fly over and record the thermal evidence. Once they have that, they can get a search warrant, kick down your door, shoot your dog, etc etc.
They do that randomly over whole districts here with ordinary police helicopters, then use the heat sig as a reason to get warrants.

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
20th February 10, 12:14 PM
^same

BadUglyMagic
20th February 10, 01:31 PM
They do that randomly over whole districts here with ordinary police helicopters, then use the heat sig as a reason to get warrants.

http://www.loompanics.com/Articles/Thermal.htm

It is a relatively short read and details what the U.S. courts look at in cases like that.

Wounded Ronin
20th February 10, 06:49 PM
So can you smear yourself with mud like Ahnold in Predator and not show up on thermals?

EuropIan
20th February 10, 08:40 PM
That particular Predator purchased a poor performance visor (no it doesn't work)

SoulMechanic
20th February 10, 08:54 PM
Mom used to cover my brother and me with mud. To date is has fended off most sexual predators.

Robot Jesus
20th February 10, 11:04 PM
wireless=hackable=lulz

on a different note. I forget where I read it, but an ex cop was trying to start a reality show were he busted police for violating due posses. the first episode was a pine tree grow op.

Zendetta
21st February 10, 01:33 PM
wireless=hackable=lulz

on a different note. I forget where I read it, but an ex cop was trying to start a reality show were he busted police for violating due posses. the first episode was a pine tree grow op.

^^^ that was awesome.

It was this guy:

http://nevergetbusted.com/2010/

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
25th February 10, 02:28 PM
Mom used to cover my brother and me with mud. To date is has fended off most sexual predators.

Most?