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Kiko
4th February 10, 12:48 PM
I have 16 chicken thighs and been lazy in the kitchen, so I think I'm gonna attempt this tonight. Probably will improvise a bit between the classic Julia Child version (http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/saras-secrets/chicken-in-red-wine-with-onions-mushrooms-and-bacon-coq-au-vin-recipe/index.html) and one from the Better Homes New cook book.

Wish me luck!

EvilSteve
4th February 10, 12:49 PM
Bon chance!

Kiko
4th February 10, 12:51 PM
I should watch "Julie and Julia" while I'm making it! Actually it wasn't a bad flick.

EvilSteve
4th February 10, 01:01 PM
I grew up watching her show on PBS... or well, my parents watched it on PBS. I actually saw a DVD of it last month. Never realized how entertaining she was, in a slightly batty sort of way.

partyboy
4th February 10, 01:09 PM
don't forget to put this on for the kids -

1Lj_lUai3ZU

Ajamil
4th February 10, 02:08 PM
I should watch "Julie and Julia" while I'm making it! Actually it wasn't a bad flick.HwqzKc2XjqA

Kiko
4th February 10, 02:23 PM
I'm cheating. It's prepped and in the crock pot on high. Pearl onions are a pain in the ass to peel!

Um.. you guys are goofy! I luv ya!

In a batty sorta way!

EvilSteve
4th February 10, 02:26 PM
There's no such thing as cheating in cooking if the result is good.

I cheat a lot- it's the only way I can make anything from the French Laundry cookbook in under 3 hours.

Commodore Pipes
4th February 10, 02:33 PM
Want to talk about cheating? I have a great coq au vin recipe I can crank out in under an hour. It's the only one I've ever tried. Maybe I should try some others, see how they compare.

Kiko
4th February 10, 02:43 PM
PB, the girls loved your video and want to show it to ALL their friends at high school!

Arjuna, there was no beans or cornbread in that clip! The girls were disappointed! They want me to neg rep you!

billy sol hurok
4th February 10, 03:08 PM
Garsh, I can't wait for the NoB parody thread!

Ajamil
4th February 10, 03:11 PM
I was simply reminded of the show. They played alright movies, but I never made a single recipe. If I had played the chimp parody you definitely would've neg repped me.

Kiko
4th February 10, 03:14 PM
http://www.motifake.com/image/demotivational-poster/0906/godzilla-facepalm-godzilla-facepalm-face-palm-epic-fail-demotivational-poster-1245384435.jpg^ for a parody thread, not for Arjuna.

I'm wondering if I wanna search for the Aykroyd Julia parody...

Robot Jesus
4th February 10, 03:53 PM
I'm cheating. It's prepped and in the crock pot on high. Pearl onions are a pain in the ass to peel!

Um.. you guys are goofy! I luv ya!

In a batty sorta way!


probably too late to be useful, but if you boil the onins for a few seconds the skin will come right off.

Kiko
4th February 10, 04:39 PM
Not too late, I'll do that next time RJ. I was stubborn about it and didn't wanna wash the pot at that point. It's all simmering now tho. Need to put the roux stuff in and then serve it over rice. I'll get reviews for later!

Kiko
4th February 10, 04:44 PM
Oh.. while we're waiting....

WaASyRFXTj4

Cullion
4th February 10, 06:00 PM
That Julia Child recipe looks very close to the way I make it. Hers is more traditional and I bet it was beautiful.

I don't use flour or butter because I make a token effort at keeping the 'empty' calories down without fucking up the flavour. I use a touch of olive oil and make sure I get that chicken really crispy and browned before I add any liquid ingredients. All the other ingredients are the same.

I cook mine for about 2 hours.

Kiko
4th February 10, 07:11 PM
What I did different... um.. I skinned the chicken, but added the skin to the bacon bits and then removed it when the fat was melted. Browned the chicken in the bacon/chicken fat - Browned the mushrooms & onions. Put each thing into the crock pot (Which didn't get hot enough, but later on that) along with the carrots - Deglazed the pan with a mixture of burgundy & marsala wine (I was feeling creative) and let the whole thing simmer a bit after covering it with stock and more wine. Added a bit of tomato paste from the other recipe.

Like I said, wasn't hot enough so I transferred everything to a large pot and simmered it a bit. Made a roux with flour a spoonful of chicken stock base and smart balance. Butter is for baking or special stuff. After thickening/finishing the sauce, back in the crock pot to keep warm.

Served over fluffy Thai rice.

Everyone here liked it very much!

Commodore Pipes
4th February 10, 07:14 PM
I haven't read the Julia Child recipe, but I save most of the bacon and use it to garnish right before I serve. It stays crunchy that way.

Also, do you use leeks as well as pearl onions? I love me some onion so I double 'em up.

Zendetta
4th February 10, 07:15 PM
LOL, French people like to eat "coq"!!!


French Laundry

Seriously though: that place is right up the road, but I've never eaten there (yet).

Kiko
4th February 10, 07:16 PM
I should have used more onions - didn't realize how much chicken I was making.. basically a double recipe I think. Leeks would be a good addition, too.

Cullion
4th February 10, 07:17 PM
In the past, I'd assumed that 'pearl onion' is what North Americans call a shallot, but I can see from wikipedia now that they aren't the same. How different is a pearl onion from a shallot?

I'm not sure about leeks in this. Leeks have a subtle, sweet flavour that might get drowned with red wine, tomato etc..

I keep leeks to go with milder flavoured beer|white wine|dairy based sauces. I think of them as more of a Northern European and less of a Mediterranean vegetable.

Zendetta
4th February 10, 07:19 PM
How different is a pearl onion from a shallot?

Quite different. Pearl onions are like little bitty onions.

Commodore Pipes
4th February 10, 07:23 PM
I don't how shallots grow, but I think a pearl onion is a type of tree onion, which grows small little bulbets in place of flowers.

As for leeks, I normally julien them and then add them at the last minute, cooking them just long wnough to wilt. To be honest, I have no idea if I am drowning them out or not.

Cullion
4th February 10, 07:23 PM
Quite different. Pearl onions are like little bitty onions.

So are shallots, but they're not 'tree onions' like pearl onions.

How does the flavour and texture differ?

Zendetta
4th February 10, 07:29 PM
Pearl onions taste like very, very mild white onions.

Despite cooking with them a lot, I can't explain how shallots taste.

They seriously don't have pearl onions in the UK? Weird.

Cullion
4th February 10, 07:30 PM
I don't how shallots grow, but I think a pearl onion is a type of tree onion, which grows small little bulbets in place of flowers.

As for leeks, I normally julien them and then add them at the last minute, cooking them just long wnough to wilt. To be honest, I have no idea if I am drowning them out or not.

I certainly don't think they would taste bad, it's just that leeks can really put some magic in a milder-flavoured recipe, as is common further North.

I'm thinking of beer-based stews and casseroles, and also the kind of white wine + a little cream type seafood dishes you get in northern France and Scandanavia.

Seafood 'Dieppoise' is a good example of what I'm talking about.
Fish, single cream, white wine, some pepper, leeks, maybe a few new potatoes and fresh french bread. It's kind of light and deeply satisfying on a cold day at the same time. You can really taste the leek.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2126/2093637081_25771f7c2b.jpg

Nom Nom Nom.

You get the best out of leeks with this stuff because they aren't just an extra vegetable with an interesting texture, they become a noticeable part of the flavour.

Commodore Pipes
4th February 10, 07:32 PM
Thanks, I'll have to check that out. Do you have a recipe for seafood Dieppoise that has worked for you? It sounds like it would make a good addition to NOM NOM NOM.

Cullion
4th February 10, 07:35 PM
Pearl onions taste like very, very mild white onions.

Despite cooking with them a lot, I can't explain how shallots taste.

They seriously don't have pearl onions in the UK? Weird.

They do, but I haven't used them.

Our supermarkets these days are full of things I've not yet cooked with and I've still got a lot of untested old-fashioned recipes to work my way through.

I don't think I've come across pearl onion as an ingredient in the classic books yet, but I think I have seen it as an ingredient as part of some ready-made, packaged stews in a local branch of an expensive supermarket chain. Until this thread I'd assumed it was a north americanism for 'shallot'.

Zendetta
4th February 10, 07:35 PM
I made a killer potato-leek soup a few weeks ago. It was awesome, but my GF suggested that I use bacon next time.

Since she is a recovering vegetarian, I considered that a win.

Cullion
4th February 10, 07:56 PM
Thanks, I'll have to check that out. Do you have a recipe for seafood Dieppoise that has worked for you? It sounds like it would make a good addition to NOM NOM NOM.

Vieux Normand might be the best man to talk to about this, as he is a Northern-France born and raised Norman. I know for certain that the way I'm about to describe it is not traditional, but the way I do it is very simple and quick to make and it tasted alright to me. It came out looking like a larger portion of that picture I pasted in above, basically.

Get some good quality white fish (like cod or hake) and some good fresh shellfish (mussels especially, but more 'warm water' stuff like big prawns or squid will also work ok as long as not overcooked).

Get some new potatoes, and some leeks.

A small pot of single cream (I dunno if you use the same naming system in the US. In the UK 'single cream' is the thinner, less rich kind that you use more for cooking sauces than the heavier kind to go on a big dessert).

A glass of 'ok' white wine that's not too sweet. Don't spend a fortune, remember you're about to throw it on top of some fish and vegetables and heat it up so any careful maturing in a cellar will be undone in 10 seconds of simmering in a hot pan.

A little black pepper.

Soften the new potatoes by par-boiling them.

Chop the leek into 1 inch disks.

Put the potato and leaks into some deep pan that's got a little hot olive oil or real unsalted butter in it. Really don't use some crappy margarine or lesser vegetable oil for this because we aren't using spices that will hide it.

Get the leaks soft. They aren't supposed to get brown or crispy or anything, so keep the heat mild.

Put your thick chunks of white fish in there. Judging by eye, it's ready for the next stage when you can't see that 'glossy' 'raw' look on the outside of the chunks any more. The 'sushi' shiny look should all be gone, but you have to keep an eye out ready for your next step as soon as it's gone.

Throw your shellfish/squid in and turn it about quick. Prawns should have most of their blue/grey turned pink before the next stage.

Ready?

Throw a glass or three of the white wine on top.

Stir in shots of single cream and twists of black pepper, and keep tasting and adding more until you are happy.

Then serve it with some fresh crusty french bread and whatever white wine you've got left.

You can experiment with one or more of the following that I've seen in other recipes for this, but I haven't tried them myself yet:-

A little bit of chopped fennel right at the start with the potatoes and leeks when they are frying.

A tiny amount of dijon mustard or cayenne pepper to warm it up.

Some fresh tomatoes, at around the same time as you add the shellfish (I'm personally suspicious of putting tomato in a cream and white wine sauce).

Commodore Pipes
4th February 10, 10:28 PM
That sounds really good. And not out of reach, technique-wise. Thank you.

Kiko
5th February 10, 04:28 PM
That sounds REALLY good, Cullion! Gonna have to try that.

Btw, the Coq Au Vin is nummy leftover!!

Cullion
5th February 10, 05:52 PM
A lot of strongly flavoured things improve with a few days in the fridge. The flavours have time to blend better.