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View Full Version : Gurkha Takeout



Cullion
29th December 09, 03:45 PM
I just had Gurkha takeout from a new place in town. It was delicious.

They had some Chinese and Tibetan looking stuff on the menu (sweet and sour dishes for the chinese, MoMo dumplings for the 'pan-Himalayan'), but I went with a curry and rice.

It was called Gaunle Kukhura. Chicken on the bone with garlic, ginger, thick tomato-based sauce. 'Popular nepalese village dish' according to the menu. Saffron Pilau with it.

Oh man.

Let's just say it was like the best North Indian curry I've ever had with a touch of some extra spice in the background I can't quite identify, a certain sourness that just fitted. No hint of any lack of freshness in the meat or vegetables or rancidness in the cooking butter. It was a huge portion of chicken for the price too.

The guy who delivered it was a middle-aged Gurkha wearing a neat shirt and tie, who introduced himself by name and shook my hand before handing the curry over. He also looked a little bit confused when I gave him a Christmas tip, which is a nice change from the normal routine with delivered takeout.

I'm very satisfied now. Warm from the belly out. They'll have my business again.

Adouglasmhor
29th December 09, 04:35 PM
Bastard, just Bastard best curry ever eaten by me was Goat cooked like you described there in the kitchen of the middle block at 8 sigs Catterick - The Guys from the Queens Gurkha signals used to get to take over that kitchen at weekends - regulars ate at the top block kitchen , a couple of us got an invite because we used to play volleyball against them in the gym and because I was a Partick Thistle supporter (Gurkha soldiers based in Glasgow used to get free admission to games so they have a huge fan club in Nepal).

Anyway I am jealous as fuck.

Cullion
29th December 09, 04:40 PM
Gurkha restaurants are opening up around the country now. I've seen them in London, the west country and the midlands. None north of the border yet ?

Adouglasmhor
29th December 09, 04:42 PM
Not seen one - some IndoPak restaraunts do a Ghorkah Royal Korma which is about as Gurkha as Lebel.

CoffeeFan
29th December 09, 05:05 PM
GOOD GOD MAN! WTF IS GOING ON IN YOUR AVATAR!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
29th December 09, 05:08 PM
he stole a picture off my facebook

Cullion
29th December 09, 05:09 PM
Not seen one - some IndoPak restaraunts do a Ghorkah Royal Korma which is about as Gurkha as Lebel.

Google mentions a couple in Edinburgh but none in Glasgow.

http://www.gurkhabrigade.com

http://www.scotland.org.uk/food/khukuri_151101.htm

Adouglasmhor
29th December 09, 05:35 PM
Go through to Edinburgh quite often so will pay a visit. Will make a change from the Mosque kitchen (excellent curry but you eat outdoors from paper plates at benches under a giant pergola) Really cheap though 50p for a nan and 3.50 for a curry with rice.

Kein Haar
29th December 09, 05:36 PM
GOOD GOD MAN! WTF IS GOING ON IN YOUR AVATAR!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

It appears to be cullion before a brisk jog.

Wish him luck.

Cullion
29th December 09, 05:38 PM
I thought he was talking about Doug's nipple punishments.

meataxe
29th December 09, 05:40 PM
I thought this thread was going to be about some military operation.

:(

Cullion
29th December 09, 05:42 PM
Oh, I forgot to mention..

The guy who delivered it didn't turn up in a car. I got a txt message saying 'look in the garden', and as I went outside, the guy just stepped out of the bushes, soundlessly. I'd been looking out the window the whole time and hadn't seen a thing. He didn't even get any mud or twigs on his immaculately pressed jacket.

Friendly guy. I'll tip more next time.

After he left I found a decapitated burglar propped-up neatly against the shed. Didn't hear any sign of a struggle.

The cut across his stump was almost surgical. I could tell it had been done with a single stroke.

When I got inside and served out the steaming curry onto plates, I noticed somebody had tied the laces on my left shoe into a 'thumbs up' symbol.

meataxe
29th December 09, 05:48 PM
Ok, that's more like it :D

Harpy
29th December 09, 05:50 PM
You suck, I was in Nepal not long ago and my husband and I pretty much had some excellent food, multiple times a day for 10 days straight.

Adouglasmhor
29th December 09, 05:52 PM
Not all Nepali are Gurkha plus did you ever have the special mushroom curry?

Harpy
29th December 09, 06:10 PM
We had dinner at a Gurkha family-run diner most evenings....'special mushroom', that sounds suspicious.

Adouglasmhor
29th December 09, 06:19 PM
Enlightening not suspicious.

Cullion
29th December 09, 06:25 PM
Gurkha are basically a caste of Hindu who eat any meat except beef, and drink alcohol, right?

Adouglasmhor
29th December 09, 06:32 PM
Yes but no eating cow. The name translates as Cow protector.

Cullion
29th December 09, 06:35 PM
I get it. IIRC the hindu castes associated with warfare are called 'Ksatriya' (sp?), is that where Gurkha fit into the big complicated hindu scheme ?

Adouglasmhor
29th December 09, 06:39 PM
The original Gurkha were a mix of Kshatriya and Brahim - modern ones include other peoples absorbed as recently as the 17th century from hill tribes in Nepal.

Cullion
29th December 09, 06:40 PM
Oh ok. I didn't realise the original gurkha were somebody other than the nepalese people. I thought all Gurkha were the tibetan-looking guys.

Adouglasmhor
29th December 09, 06:56 PM
Some look more north Indian I think they all were in Nepal a long time though.

Ajamil
30th December 09, 12:36 AM
I get it. IIRC the hindu castes associated with warfare are called 'Ksatriya' (sp?), is that where Gurkha fit into the big complicated hindu scheme ? This certainly fits the structure. Ksatriyas (the first s is pronounced with a hint of sh, but the spelling would take using alt keys and screw that) were allowed to hunt (usually mentioned as deer, elephant, or other carnivores) and eat meat. Not surprisingly, this factor of eating meat (though specifically mentioned as through the blood) is what is purported to give the ksatriyas their viciousness and their greater strength. Viciousness might be suspect. Edit: And really the wrong word. More of an exuberance for competition and battle.

It'd be easiest to tell by looking through someone's geneology. Last names were used as indication of caste. It can get complicated, as there are sub castes either from marrying above or below your own, and which gender is from which caste, but I would easily accept that the gurkhas come from ksatriya and brahmin families. They were royal guards after all.

Adouglasmhor
30th December 09, 01:34 AM
The Gurkha I know best (secretary of the local allotment association friendly society) is a Church of Scotland Elder so the Hindu thing doesn't count for him of course. He still doesn't and wont eat cow though.

SFGOON
30th December 09, 01:39 AM
Granpappy was a Gurkha.

My Granpappy, God rest his soul.

Gurkhas are not to be fucked with. You probably shouldn't be stealing their food.

Adouglasmhor
30th December 09, 01:46 AM
My dad's dad in WW1 ended up on an assault with his Battalion of HLI , a Gurkha Battalion and a Portuguese Battalion. When the whistle blew the Portuguese had to give a punty up to the Gurkhas to get them over the top of the trench. It was one of only a couple of stories he told me about his war.

SFGOON
30th December 09, 01:50 AM
They're probably the closest thing to literal dwarves in existence today.l

socratic
30th December 09, 05:34 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gurkha

I agree with Arjuna, they sound like Ksatriyas to me, but mixing with Brahmins wouldn't be surprising. I'm told that as much as castes are rigid, there are a lot of people who are very nebulously defined.

Fun trivia about Ksatriyas (and probably Gurkhas): They are assosciated with the colour red, Arjuna was a Ksatriya, and Ksatriyas also constituted the rulers and kings as well as warriors. Brahmins were hypothetically exclusively priests and mystics.

Damn, I wish we had Himalayan food here in town. :(

Craigypooh
30th December 09, 06:01 AM
You've sold me. What do you recommend:

http://www.gurkha-kitchen.co.uk/takeaway.pdf

Cullion
30th December 09, 06:45 AM
If I was ordering off that menu I'd have the Pokhareli Lamb or the Himali duck and have the Rashilo Bhat (rice cooked with spices and brown onion). I never tried either before, but it sounds more like something you'd actually get in Nepal than stir-fried squid etc..

I've seen some documentaries about Gurkha soldiers and their cooks always seem to be cooking up northern-indian style curries but with a lot more meat. Goat and chicken mostly.

danno
30th December 09, 07:52 AM
i had a goat curry from a gurkha restaurant not long ago. the goat didn't seem to be butchered professionally. there were flecks of bone all through it. tasted pretty good though. my girlfriend had a chicken curry i think which she said was great.

after serving with them in WWII, grandad once said that he'd rather fight alongside one gurkha than 10 americans. that statement possibly had more to do with his distaste for american culture than anything...

Craigypooh
30th December 09, 08:39 AM
If I was ordering off that menu I'd have the Pokhareli Lamb or the Himali duck and have the Rashilo Bhat (rice cooked with spices and brown onion). I never tried either before, but it sounds more like something you'd actually get in Nepal than stir-fried squid etc..

I've seen some documentaries about Gurkha soldiers and their cooks always seem to be cooking up northern-indian style curries but with a lot more meat. Goat and chicken mostly.

The duck seems like a pretty good choice to me too, although I might go for the Tama Chicken as it's a bit spicier (according to their chilli scale).

Cullion
30th December 09, 12:10 PM
i had a goat curry from a gurkha restaurant not long ago. the goat didn't seem to be butchered professionally. there were flecks of bone all through it. tasted pretty good though. my girlfriend had a chicken curry i think which she said was great.

The bone splinters in goat recipes might be something about goat. I've eaten in a few different Caribbean restaurants quite a bit in Oxford. They are into goat curry too (different spices though, usually with scotch bonnet pepper, ginger, coconut, thyme and allspice), their goat on the bone always seems to splinter up a bit too.

You get the impression that a dude just hacked the animal apart with a machete, right? Maybe it's that, or maybe goats just have bones that flake apart a bit when you cook them for a long time, I don't know.



after serving with them in WWII, grandad once said that he'd rather fight alongside one gurkha than 10 americans. that statement possibly had more to do with his distaste for american culture than anything...

Heard simillar stories from a few old men in the village where I grew up. Obviously there's nationalism and a little bit of urban mythology involved (stories about them having ninja-like stealth abilities and super-human stamina abound), but my understanding is that Gurkhas really are extremely brave, loyal and physically fit.

danno
30th December 09, 04:09 PM
You get the impression that a dude just hacked the animal apart with a machete, right? Maybe it's that, or maybe goats just have bones that flake apart a bit when you cook them for a long time, I don't know.

yeah, a machete or a chainsaw.

that's interesting, i wonder if it is a quality of the meat.


Heard simillar stories from a few old men in the village where I grew up. Obviously there's nationalism and a little bit of urban mythology involved (stories about them having ninja-like stealth abilities and super-human stamina abound), but my understanding is that Gurkhas really are extremely brave, loyal and physically fit.

same here. there has to be some truth to the legend.

Keith
30th December 09, 04:34 PM
Heard simillar stories from a few old men in the village where I grew up. Obviously there's nationalism and a little bit of urban mythology involved (stories about them having ninja-like stealth abilities and super-human stamina abound), but my understanding is that Gurkhas really are extremely brave, loyal and physically fit.

A British captain approaches the Gurka sergeant in charge of the Gurka platoon. He says, "We have a very dangerous mission. It's unlikely that any of you will survive. The mission is to drop out of an airplane behind enemy lines and take out the garrison camped in a fortified position. Because this mission is so dangerous, we are only sending volunteers. Ask the unit how many will go."

The Gurka sergeant speaks to the unit and replies, "About half of them sir.."

The captain says, "Half? Only half? I thought you Gurkas were supposed to be toughest, bravest warriors in the world! What scares them so much about parachuting.."

The sergeant interrupts him "Parachutes? You didn't say anything about parachutes!"

Cullion
30th December 09, 04:37 PM
And those are the kind of people I want in charge of my spicey chicken and rice dinner.

Adouglasmhor
30th December 09, 04:41 PM
Maybe they just hacked the apart with a kukhri that's what they did with the goat I ate in Catterick.

Cullion
30th December 09, 04:46 PM
Hmm.. You'd have thought they bought the goat butchered when they're running a restaurant, just to save time. And Jamaicans get their goat all splintered up too, as far as I can tell.

Adouglasmhor
30th December 09, 04:50 PM
Possible. BTW Jamaicans call it Curry Goat not goat Curry in Bristol at least, they are weird about it.

socratic
30th December 09, 07:04 PM
If memory serves I've had goat off the bone that didn't have the 'splintering' (mmm, Arabic food). It was like eating any other animal off the bone, I guess.

Maybe poorly butchered animal?

There's a lot of very very warlike and very talented peoples in the Himalayas. The Nepalese are known for being badasses to a man as well.

Ajamil
30th December 09, 08:42 PM
In the Vedas, the little dwarf/goblin like dudes (yakshas, led by Kuvera) were attributed with illusion powers and were especially hardy in battle. Said to inhabit the himalayas and guard the wealth of the gods.

Cullion
30th December 09, 08:45 PM
What was the wealth of the gods?

Ajamil
30th December 09, 08:52 PM
These days? The Crown Jewels, I'd imagine. ;P

I figure a lot of the gold and precious jewels in that region came from the mountains, thus the people that lived there were the guardians of it.

Adouglasmhor
31st December 09, 01:31 AM
What was the wealth of the gods?

Temple Ball

http://www.wwwshop.nl/usersgallery/albums/userpics/nepalese_temple_ball.jpg

Yiktin Voxbane
5th January 10, 10:37 AM
Oh, I forgot to mention..

The guy who delivered it didn't turn up in a car. I got a txt message saying 'look in the garden', and as I went outside, the guy just stepped out of the bushes, soundlessly. I'd been looking out the window the whole time and hadn't seen a thing. He didn't even get any mud or twigs on his immaculately pressed jacket.

Friendly guy. I'll tip more next time.

After he left I found a decapitated burglar propped-up neatly against the shed. Didn't hear any sign of a struggle.

The cut across his stump was almost surgical. I could tell it had been done with a single stroke.

When I got inside and served out the steaming curry onto plates, I noticed somebody had tied the laces on my left shoe into a 'thumbs up' symbol.


You must spread some Reputation around before giving it to Cullion again

Has got my Molecules'n stuff lolling.