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Harpy
7th October 09, 05:47 PM
I've just woken up to the fact that some of the olive oil I've been purchasing is not 'pure' (i.e. virgin).

I use a number of oils in cooking and baking (olive, canola, sesame and sunflower) but olive oil is my favourite so I've decided to finally read up a little on what's what.


* Did you know that there is an 'International Olive Oil Council' (IOOC) based in Spain with 23 member nations? The US is not part of the IOOC so their classifications are not legally recognised by the IOOC.

http://www.internationaloliveoil.org/ (http://www.internationaloliveoil.org/)

Here is a siimple breakdown copy-pasta'd from the Interwebz:


Retail grade classifications (IOOC)


Extra-virgin olive oil comes from virgin oil production only, contains no more than 0.8% acidity, and is judged to have a superior taste. Produced by the use of physical means and no chemical treatment. Best for salad dressings and vinaigrettes. Brush on grilled fish or meat. Not suited for frying.

Virgin olive oil comes from virgin oil production only, has an acidity less than 2%, and is judged to have a good taste. Produced by the use of physical means and no chemical treatment. Use to marinade meat, saute, salad dressing.

Pure olive oil. Oils labeled as Pure olive oil or Olive oil are usually a blend of refined and virgin production oil. Refined means that the oil has been chemically treated to neutralize strong tastes (characterized as defects) and neutralize the acid content

Olive oil is a blend of virgin and refined production oil, of no more than 1.5% acidity. It commonly lacks a strong flavor. Grilling, frying, baking.


Olive-pomace oil is refined pomace olive production oil possibly blended with some virgin production oil. Just don't.

Lampante oil is olive oil not suitable as food; lampante comes from olive oil's long-standing use in oil-burning lamps. Blargh.

Refined olive oil is the olive oil obtained from virgin olive oils by refining methods which do not lead to alterations in the initial glyceridic structure. It has a free acidity, expressed as oleic acid, of not more than 0.3 grams per 100 grams (0.3%) and its other characteristics correspond to those fixed for this category in this standard. This is obtained by refining virgin olive oils which have a high acidity level and/or organoleptic defects which are eliminated after refining. Over 50% of the oil produced in the Mediterranean area is of such poor quality that it must be refined to produce an edible product. Note that no solvents have been used to extract the oil but it has been refined with the use of charcoal and other chemical and physical filters.I like this website as it gives a simple summary of the best uses for each type of olive oil (no strap-on references for NoB but I'm sure one can extrapolate from the list):

http://www.oliveoilfromspain.com/OOFS/culinary/cooking.asp?parent=everything

EuropIan
7th October 09, 05:54 PM
Olive oil also evaporates at lower temperatures than, say, sesame or cannola oil.

Which is a good idea to keep in mind when you fry stuff in olive oil

Cullion
7th October 09, 06:03 PM
Extra virgin olive oil and flaxseed oil are the only two which the paleo-diet books and papers I've read recommend. There are reasons why the paleo-diet can be hard to stick to (as I've posted elsewhere) but wherever possible, I try to follow the principles.

I have never tried cooking with flaxseed oil. Extra-virgin olive oil is easier to get hold of and tastes good. People in Europe have been cooking and dressing their food with this stuff for a very, very long time. The most important thing the papers I've read say is that it's worth paying the extra to buy it totally uncut with other types of vegetable oil, for health reasons.

HappyOldGuy
7th October 09, 06:11 PM
Olive oil also evaporates at lower temperatures than, say, sesame or cannola oil.

Which is a good idea to keep in mind when you fry stuff in olive oil

Extra virgin. The regular stuff has a higher smokepoint.

Zendetta
7th October 09, 06:17 PM
Sesame oil tastes great but smokes at very low temps.

Canola oil is also known as "rapeseed oil"

Also:

LOL, Lily.... even her olive oil ain't virginal!!! /obligatory

Harpy
7th October 09, 08:10 PM
Olive oil also evaporates at lower temperatures than, say, sesame or cannola oil.

Which is a good idea to keep in mind when you fry stuff in olive oil

Are you talking about extra-virgin or virgin olive oil here? Do you find a change in the taste of the food if you overheat the oil?

socratic
8th October 09, 07:55 AM
Extra virgin olive oil and flaxseed oil are the only two which the paleo-diet books and papers I've read recommend. There are reasons why the paleo-diet can be hard to stick to (as I've posted elsewhere) but wherever possible, I try to follow the principles. I've heard people mention coconut oil as very viable when following Paleo/Paleo-esque diets. The nutritionist over on T-nation.com raves about it every now and again.


I have never tried cooking with flaxseed oil.I haven't eaten it but I hear it tastes like shit.

Tom Kagan
8th October 09, 09:20 AM
A capful of extra virgin olive oil and a quick sprinkle of salt is a reasonbly healthy and tasty alternative to a pad of butter spread... although it's a bit messier, too.

A.D.D
8th October 09, 10:04 AM
I've heard people mention coconut oil as very viable when following Paleo/Paleo-esque diets. The nutritionist over on T-nation.com raves about it every now and again.

I haven't eaten it but I hear it tastes like shit.

It is especially good if you are a vegan.

Since it is the only (that I know of) source of saturated fat you will find from a plant.

Totemicist
8th October 09, 10:14 AM
My family have a shitload of olive groves in northern Morocco, we (read I am not involved in the production at all) produce olive oil for the local market, I am telling you it makes the even the extra virgin olive oil available in the Uk taste like over processed crap.

I have brought some back to the Uk a couple of times but it is a hassle.

EuropIan
8th October 09, 11:19 AM
Are you talking about extra-virgin or virgin olive oil here? Do you find a change in the taste of the food if you overheat the oil?
It's a bad idea to overheat the oil.

socratic
8th October 09, 08:56 PM
Doesn't heating transform the lipid profile from polyunsaturated/saturated to trans fats?

Aphid Jones
8th October 09, 11:36 PM
It seems like a waste to use even normal olive oil for frying. Does anyone here use safflower oil with any regularity?

resolve
10th October 09, 12:43 AM
I use Olive Oil strictly for light pasta meals or making bread dip.

Everything else I use vegetable oil. I want to try coconut oil but I heard it comes in like a fatty substance that you have to melt to get it fluid enough to use. I'm not about that extra effort...

I like simple 3 to 4 ingredient dishes. It makes life so much easier when cooking for oneself.

Quikfeet509
10th October 09, 09:17 AM
I hate quoting wiki but this is a good reference:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smoke_point


The smoke point generally refers to the temperature at which a cooking fat or oil begins to break down to glycerol and free fatty acids. The glycerol is then further broken down to acrolein which is a component of the bluish smoke. It is the presence of the acrolein that causes the smoke to be extremely irritating to the eyes and throat. The smoke point also marks the beginning of both flavor and nutritional degradation. Therefore, it is a key consideration when selecting a fat for frying, with the smoke point of the specific oil dictating what maximum temperature and therefore what purposes a particular fat may be used for. For instance, deep frying is a very high temperature process requiring a fat with a high smoke point.
Considerably above the temperature of the smoke point is the flash point; the point at which combustion occurs.
Here are some smoke points:
Fat Quality Smoke Point
Almond oil 420F 216C
Avocado oil 520F 271C
Butter 350F 177C
Canola oil Expeller Press 464F 240C
Canola oil High Oleic 475F 246C
Canola oil Refined 470F 240C
Coconut oil Unrefined 350F 177C
Coconut oil Refined 450F 232C
Corn oil Unrefined 320F 160C
Corn oil Refined 450F 232C
Cottonseed oil 420F 216C
Flax seed oil Unrefined 225F 107C
Ghee (Indian Clarified Butter) 485F 252C
Grapeseed oil 420F 216C
Hazelnut oil 430F 221C
Hemp oil 330F 165C
Lard 370F 182C
Macadamia oil 413F 210C
Olive oil Extra virgin 375F 191C
Olive oil Virgin 420F 216C
Olive oil Pomace 460F 238C
Olive oil Extra light 468F 242C
Olive oil, high quality (low acidity) Extra virgin 405F 207C
Palm oil Difractionated 455F 235C[1]
Peanut oil Unrefined 320F 160C
Peanut oil Refined 450F 232C
Rice bran oil 490F 254C
Safflower oil Unrefined 225F 107C
Safflower oil Semirefined 320F 160C
Safflower oil Refined 510F 266C
Sesame oil Unrefined 350F 177C
Sesame oil Semirefined 450F 232C
Soybean oil Unrefined 320F 160C
Soybean oil Semirefined 350F 177C
Soybean oil Refined 450F 232C
Sunflower oil Unrefined 225F 107C
Sunflower oil Semirefined 450F 232C
Sunflower oil, high oleic Unrefined 320F 160C
Sunflower oil Refined 450F 232C
Tea seed oil 485F 252C
Vegetable shortening 360F 182C
Walnut oil Unrefined 320F 160C
Walnut oil Semirefined 400F 204C
[edit]References

^ (Italian) Scheda tecnica dell'olio di palma bifrazionato PO 64.
Cooking For Engineers: Smoke Point of Various Fats - another list of smoke points along with some discussion on the subject
Good Eats: Cooking Oil Smoke Points
The Culinary Institute of America (1996). The New Professional Chef (6th edition ed.). John Wiley & Sons.

A.D.D
13th October 09, 11:27 AM
I use Olive Oil strictly for light pasta meals or making bread dip.

Everything else I use vegetable oil. I want to try coconut oil but I heard it comes in like a fatty substance that you have to melt to get it fluid enough to use. I'm not about that extra effort...

Bleh, vegetable oil.

Well, they are fat. But I think what you mean is it is SOLID. Coconut oil might be pretty solid (or solid) at room temperature depending on how warm it is.

I have some in my fridge and it is a rock. When I first bought a jar I kept it out like I did any other oil. But it grew mold so I decided to refrigerate it in the future.

Cullion
31st January 10, 03:06 PM
I've never used coconut oil, but coconut milk is beautiful in a curry.

Spade: The Real Snake
31st January 10, 03:52 PM
I've never used coconut oil, but coconut milk is beautiful in a curry.

Oh yes.

There was a Cambodian restaurant we used to frequent in SF that featured a delectable Coconut Milk Chicken Curry over jasmine rice that was just exquisite.

OZZ
1st February 10, 04:29 PM
I use olive oil, pepper and vinegar for salad dressing almost exclusively. I also like it with pasta ..whole grain pasta with olive oil, feta cheese and pepper is quick and easy, delicious.
We use a lot of it in our house.

Lights Out
6th February 10, 07:12 AM
It seems like a waste to use even normal olive oil for frying.

I beleive olive oil is cheaper on Spain than in some other countries.

Anyway, olive oil for deep frying is not such a good idea because of the heavy flavour it has, sunflower is usually a better choice.

Olive oil is one of the cornerstones of spanish cuisine, but it is best used in moderation (both in taste and health).

socratic
14th February 10, 06:30 PM
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