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View Full Version : Non-Cantonese Chinese recipes anyone?



Sang
30th September 09, 05:46 AM
I've been craving some decent Chinese food ever since i got back from my trip but i can't find any recipes which are not either bastardized Western versions, Catonese or so greasy restaurant food. I'm chasing those clean, often spicy dishes you would eat in Nanjing, Shanghai or the Sichuan province. Tradition as possible would be great even to the cuts of meat they use.

I'd appreciate it if one of you fine food connoisseurs could help. In return i'll shout beers if you are ever in Australia :).

Kein Haar
30th September 09, 01:40 PM
Ah-so, ah-so, yuck foo.

HappyOldGuy
30th September 09, 02:02 PM
Unfortunately, I almost never cook chinese at home other than simple stir fry's.

I have a couple of rockin restaurant rec's, but those won't do you much good.

socratic
30th September 09, 05:59 PM
I've been craving some decent Chinese food ever since i got back from my trip but i can't find any recipes which are not either bastardized Western versions, Catonese or so greasy restaurant food. I'm chasing those clean, often spicy dishes you would eat in Nanjing, Shanghai or the Sichuan province. Tradition as possible would be great even to the cuts of meat they use.

I'd appreciate it if one of you fine food connoisseurs could help. In return i'll shout beers if you are ever in Australia :). Shanghai food isn't all that spicy, and it certainly was quite oily and saucy and flavoursome, unless maybe I was ordering the wrong kind. You'd be surprised the number of restaurants that actually serve sweet-n-sour, even if it isn't original Chinese. To be honest I don't even remember the names of the dishes I ate when I was over there, I just remember they all kicked ass. If you want some 'real' unadulterated Chinese food you should try and find some Xian-Muslim recipes, since I doubt the small community of Muslims in Xian has had a chance to really adapt their cuisine for western palates in such a way as the Cantonese have, for example. I'm guessing since Nanjing is in the south noodle recipes would dominate (as they do in Xian) and here's some Sichuan recipes:

http://www.panix.com/~tindall/sichuan.html

It seems like Szechuan = Sichuan, according to google.

resolve
30th September 09, 08:34 PM
Most of my stuff I cook is based off the 4 star chef that I work with. He cooks the restaurant's Americanized stuff all day but then unwinds by making something particularly awesome for the chefs and servers in the back for dinner.

Unfortunately he's from Hong Kong, so therefore his dishes are Cantonese. Sorry.

He still refuses to give me his dumpling recipe though >_<;

Cullion
2nd October 09, 11:45 AM
Other than simple stir fries I only know a couple of basic cantonese hot pot recipes.

Somebody from Hong Kong might know some non-cantonese old fashioned recipes because AIUI there were some people from deeper into the mainland who made their way there due to China's various troubles in the early 20th century.

PsychoMongoose
2nd October 09, 03:18 PM
Take 500g of belly pork. Simmer in boiling water for 3-4 minutes, then allow to cool and cut into chunks.

Put 2 tbsp of groundnut oil into a wok, add 2 tbsp of white sugar and cook on a low heat until the sugar melts. Then turn up the heat until the sugar goes a rich caramel colour. Add the chunks of belly pork and splash in 1 tbsp of Shaoxing wine.

Cover the meat with water, then add 20g sliced ginger, 1 star anise, 2 dried red chillies and a cinnamon stick (or cassia bark). Simmer over a low heat for 40-50 minutes.

At the end of this cooking time turn up the heat, reduce the sauce, and, just before serving, add some spring onion.

Enjoy!

p.s. This recipe comes from the excellent book "Revolutionary Chinese Cookbook" by Fushia Dunlop. I highly recommend it or her other book "Sichuan Cookery". They both contain a plethora of authentic Hunanese and Sichuan recipies. While she may be British Fushia Dunlop was trained as a chef in China at a top Chinese cookery school.

Sang
3rd October 09, 03:41 AM
Thanks for the suggestions guys.

I may be wrongly biased against Cantonese food due to to western adapted chinese food we get here, i didn't spend any time in Hong Kong or Beijing so i most likely missed out on some great canto food. I remember eating that dish Psycho, thanks for the book recommendation.

Cullion
3rd October 09, 05:26 AM
Generic chinese takeout in the west is to 'cantonese food' as McDonald's is to your mother's cooking.

socratic
4th October 09, 06:39 AM
Beijing food is not Cantonese food. That's where Peking Duck comes from.

Sang
5th October 09, 08:11 AM
Cheers. I know shit-all about Chinese food except that it tastes absolutely amazing and is good for you. The food i ate in Shanghai was pretty spicy, albiet not Thai-hot. If it usually isn't its probably because i was there with a guy from the Nanjing area so he would have taken me to restaurants more to his tastes. His family owns a few restaurants so the food was definitely a high-light of the trip. I'll checkout some xian-muslim recipes over the next week.

socratic
5th October 09, 05:40 PM
Cheers. I know shit-all about Chinese food except that it tastes absolutely amazing and is good for you. The food i ate in Shanghai was pretty spicy, albiet not Thai-hot. If it usually isn't its probably because i was there with a guy from the Nanjing area so he would have taken me to restaurants more to his tastes. His family owns a few restaurants so the food was definitely a high-light of the trip. I'll checkout some xian-muslim recipes over the next week.I don't know how hard it would be to find Xian-Muslim stuff, but I just remember it being quite spicey and flavoursome.

Nanjing is in the south (litereally means 'Southern Capital') so I'm guessing it's Chili-tastic. Xian is in the south, now that I think about it, so it should be Chili-tastic too. I also remember that the south is characterised by noodles (they grow wheat in the south) whereas the North is rice.