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Toby Christensen
5th September 09, 12:06 AM
That being:

Roast chook with stuffing and gravy
Steak
Kangaroo curry
Meat pies
Lamingtons
Peach Melba
Pavlova
etc.

HOME MADE.

Recipes pls

bob
5th September 09, 12:11 AM
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3576/3398491735_4f1b12b1e4.jpg?v=0http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3576/3398491735_4f1b12b1e4.jpg?v=0

Toby Christensen
5th September 09, 12:42 AM
Bornsceptic...

I think I hate you.

Ajamil
5th September 09, 02:21 AM
Is there improper Aussie food? Does it involve dingoes and said creatures gorging upon human infants?

Do you have any recipes of your own you'd like to share with us?

socratic
5th September 09, 03:41 AM
THERE'SNO SUCH THING AS AUSTRALIAN FOOD

WE TOOK EVERYTHING THAT WE CONSIDER 'AUSTRALIAN' FROM SOMEWHERE ELSE

EXCEPT MAYBE THE WILDLIFE. I GUESS EATING THAT SHIT IS AUSTALIAN.

GODDAMN.

Steve
5th September 09, 03:59 AM
Meat pies made of the funnel web spider.

Now that would be Australian.

EDIT: with a VB to wash it down.

DOUBLE EDIT: actually, a XXXX would be more appropriate.

Craigypooh
5th September 09, 04:04 AM
Whenever I've been in Oz the universal recipe was:

Take meat out of fridge
Put it on the barbie
Wait a bit
Turn it over
Wait a bit
Serve

Cullion
5th September 09, 04:25 AM
What's a 'chook' ?

Ajamil
5th September 09, 04:31 AM
DOUBLE EDIT: actually, a XXXX would be more appropriate.
http://www.marriedtothesea.com/022107/standards-of-decency.gif

Kiko
5th September 09, 04:59 AM
Improper Australian food? That's easy!!

http://www.wpro-tour.com/Tour_News/OutbacklogoRB.jpg

And yes,... what's a Chook? Oh, I'll google it...


Ohh! makes sense now, Bruce!

Toby Christensen
5th September 09, 05:08 AM
I am going to be cross with you for that now Kiko

Kiko
5th September 09, 05:18 AM
Why? It's right up there with Olive Garden, Chili's, Red Lobster or Applebee's. I said it stinks.

Only good thing about Olive Garden is that you can play Cheese Chicken (http://kingcelt.blogspot.com/2006/03/hospitaliano.html)!

socratic
5th September 09, 05:36 AM
What's a 'chook' ?A chicken. Roast chook = roast chicken.

Kiko
5th September 09, 05:42 AM
He's never going to learn to do the work if we keep doing it for him, you know....

socratic
5th September 09, 05:51 AM
He's never going to learn to do the work if we keep doing it for him, you know....Cullion's a conservative. He's patently incapable of learning anything. That's why they all find change so threatening, because they can't compute it...

:D BFF, Cullion old boy?

Cullion
5th September 09, 06:00 AM
I'm keeping a list you know, for when my time comes.

socratic
5th September 09, 06:23 AM
I'm keeping a list you know, for when my time comes. Proscriptions, eh? How very conservative of you. Conserving way back to the Classical era.

Kiko
5th September 09, 07:14 AM
Cullion's a conservative. He's patently incapable of learning anything. That's why they all find change so threatening, because they can't compute it..

So am I. I LOVE learning things. I don't seek change or usually welcome it, but it is a good thing most times. I even believe that some liberals can teach me things.

Cullion
5th September 09, 07:21 AM
I'm a liberal, it's just that I'm a time-travelling liberal from 1826 who's managed to land himself a job as a software developer.

Kiko
5th September 09, 07:29 AM
^
See? I just learned that!

danno
5th September 09, 08:19 AM
used to eat damper (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Damper_(food))from time to time as a kid.

i'm planning to start eating kangaroo more often. it's better for the environment and has less fat.

also, bush tucker (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bush_tucker).

Cullion
5th September 09, 08:48 AM
What's the nearest thing to kangaroo that I'm likely to have tasted ? Venison? Beef?

danno
5th September 09, 09:02 AM
it's different to all that.

i always have trouble describing meat flavour. i really can't tell what is "gamey" or not for example.

but i can say this - it's extremely low in fat so if you overcook it, it's dry, tough and tasteless. otherwise it's very nice, especially with sauce or... whatever.

i don't know much about food.

Cullion
5th September 09, 09:04 AM
Have you tasted venison ? I don't know why, but 'roos just look like they would produce that kind of meat. It's dark, and very lean too.

danno
5th September 09, 09:11 AM
so that's deer?

now that i think of it, no. i've had roo, snake, emu, crocodile, but not deer.

well, i'd say that roo has even less fat than venison, if you can imagine what that tastes like.

Cullion
5th September 09, 09:18 AM
Yeah venison is meat from deer. Looking at pictures of roo meat on google images it seems to have about the same amount of fat (i.e. very little) but be lighter in colour.

In Europe the meats we'd consider traditional 'game' meats would include:-

Deer,
Pheasant,
Pigeon,
Grouse,
Guinea Fowl,
Boar

I don't know if any of the game species we eat here have been transported and succesfully raised in Australia. Maybe they'd have trouble with the kind of venomous insects and snakes you have in Oz, but the cooler greener parts of the country (or maybe NZ?) should be OK climate wise and European breeds of sheep and cattle seem to do fine.

danno
5th September 09, 04:46 PM
damn it's hard to find nutritional stats on venison! i'm really surprised at how low in fat it is. it appears to be a little over 3% fat. roo meat is between 1% and 2%, apparently.

i've eaten feral pig during a week-long pig hunt on a massive property in brewarrina, the middle of nowhere. but it was kept in a pen, fattened up, wormed and so on for about a year beforehand. it tasted pretty much like typical pork to me. i remember laughing because a piece of meat i picked up still had hair and a massive nipple on it.

many feral species do quite well in australia as you may have heard, i've never seen a pheasant, grouse or guinea fowl that i know of. don't know of anyone who eats them either. there are deer farms around here, but probably just as many emu farms and few people eat either.

we've actually bred a few different kinds of sheep and cattle who are better at dealing with the dry, hot climate. problem is, they still need a LOT more water than the native animals do. part of the reason roos are better for the land.

Cullion
5th September 09, 04:55 PM
The low fat for Venison is characteristic of animals raised on a 'wild' diet which haven't been selecitvely bred to be fat. Most animals only produce that kind of meat when you specially breed them to be so and then stuff them with grain or other synthetic feed. Wild boars are different from feral pigs in that they are actually quite a different breed (i.e. covered in hair) as well as having a different diet, and the meat is darker and stronger flavoured than pork.

Northern European wild animals are just adapted for cool forests and grassland instead of desert and hot scrubland, so they might need a bit of extra fat to keep warm in winter.

P.S. Rabbits and Hares are a game meat too, I guess you have them in Oz, but do they run wild ?

I'd be interested in trying 'Roo, it sounds healthy and good for somebody trying to eat 'paleo'. How expensive is it relative to things like beef or lamb in Australia ?

bob
5th September 09, 05:05 PM
These guys sell it in London

http://freedownfood.co.uk/kangaroo.aspx

It certainly doesn't taste much like venison. Very easy to overcook and a little less rich perhaps. Takes getting used to if you're raised on the humble cow.

Some of the health benefits, apart from the low fat, supposedly come from this stuff -
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conjugated_linoleic_acid

danno
5th September 09, 05:14 PM
The low fat for Venison is characteristic of animals raised on a 'wild' diet which haven't been selecitvely bred to be fat. Most animals only produce that kind of meat when you specially breed them to be so and then stuff them with grain or other synthetic feed.

yeah, that makes sense.


Wild boars are different from feral pigs in that they are actually quite a different breed (i.e. covered in hair) as well as having a different diet, and the meat is darker and stronger flavoured than pork.

we have these big hairy things with tusks running around (one my bro shot recently (http://img193.imageshack.us/img193/8315/bendemerepig2.jpg)), but also domesticated pigs have bred with them. some of them are absolutely huge.

http://www.hoax-slayer.com/images/giant-feral-pig-1.jpg

i've never seen one that big in person, but it's damn impressive.

i'd say the one i ate had a lot of domestic in it... either that or i'm hopeless at distinguishing flavour.


P.S. Rabbits and Hares are a game meat too, I guess you have them in Oz, but do they run wild ?

they certainly do, they've been a massive pest. their numbers were reduced quite a lot by releasing diseases.

it used to be pretty common to eat them. i ate some as a kid, but forget what it tastes like.


I'd be interested in trying 'Roo, it sounds healthy and good for somebody trying to eat 'paleo'. How expensive is it relative to things like beef or lamb in Australia ?

about the same price i think. it's definitely affordable. i've read from a few sources that it's just about the healthiest meat you can eat.

Cullion
5th September 09, 05:18 PM
Alright I'm sold on Roo meat now. Mrs Cullion just told me she ate it in a fancy Sydney restaurant before I met her, served rare and cooked just right so it was tender, and she gave it a thumbs up. She squeaks like a rusty hinge if there's anything wrong with her food.

P.S. Danno, that's no pig, that's some kind of mutant Australian wild boar. Kill it with fire and ginger-based sauces.

Cullion
5th September 09, 05:30 PM
These guys sell it in London

http://freedownfood.co.uk/kangaroo.aspx

It certainly doesn't taste much like venison. Very easy to overcook and a little less rich perhaps. Takes getting used to if you're raised on the humble cow.

Thank you BS. I expected a price hike because it must be costly to import, but roo rump steak from that store prices just a bit above cheap stewing beef but well below the expensive beef steak cuts by weight, so it's no harm to try it. I've started a nom nom nom thread about this.

Toby Christensen
5th September 09, 05:57 PM
Apparently wild pig is magnificent if the porkers are weaned, but I am not allowed to be a slaughterer.

Family orders

(And yes what my older brothers say goes).

Cullion
5th September 09, 06:16 PM
Are you allowed to catch fish and gut them? I've been a fishmonger, it's a quick piece of work. I don't know what sort of edible nutritious fish Australian fresh waters might produce.

socratic
5th September 09, 07:45 PM
What's the nearest thing to kangaroo that I'm likely to have tasted ? Venison? Beef?Beef. A kangaroo steak tastes a lot like a regular steak, just better.



I don't know if any of the game species we eat here have been transported and succesfully raised in Australia. Maybe they'd have trouble with the kind of venomous insects and snakes you have in Oz, but the cooler greener parts of the country (or maybe NZ?) should be OK climate wise and European breeds of sheep and cattle seem to do fine.Boar (or wild pig, whatever), camel, rabbits buffalo, crocodile, kangaroo, snake, emu, possum... We have a very large meat industry based mostly on sheep and cattle, fyi. Most of SE Asia imports meat from us.



P.S. Rabbits and Hares are a game meat too, I guess you have them in Oz, but do they run wild ?

I'd be interested in trying 'Roo, it sounds healthy and good for somebody trying to eat 'paleo'. How expensive is it relative to things like beef or lamb in Australia ? 1. You never heard of the Rabbit Proof Fence? We've even tried bloody biological warfare against rabbits (to no avail). My mother used to eat rabbit caught by her uncle and his hunting dogs (yay country town poverty!)

2. Cheaper than beef and lamb.


Are you allowed to catch fish and gut them? I've been a fishmonger, it's a quick piece of work. I don't know what sort of edible nutritious fish Australian fresh waters might produce.Depends. There's always regulations when fishing but other than that you can do what you want.

danno
5th September 09, 07:53 PM
might as well look it up...


Releasing rabbit-borne diseases has proven somewhat successful in controlling the population of rabbits in Australia. In 1950, after research carried out by Frank Fenner, Myxomatosis was deliberately released into the rabbit population, causing it to drop from an estimated 600 million to around 100 million. Genetic resistance in the remaining rabbits allowed the population to recover to 200-300 million by 1991.

To combat this trend, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) developed and accidentally released calicivirus (also known as Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease or RHD) in 1996. The success of the virus was found to be higher in extreme heat. This was because it appears there is another calicivirus in the colder, wetter areas of Australia, and that this virus was immunising rabbits against the more virulent form.

The Australian Government refuses to legalise a vaccine to protect pet rabbits against Myxomatosis, for fear the rabbit may escape and transmit resistance to the disease[citation needed]. A legal vaccine exists in Australia for RHD. There is no cure for either Myxomatosis or RHD, and many affected pets are euthanised. In Europe, where rabbits are farmed on a large scale, they are protected against myxomatosis and calicivirus with a genetically modified virus.[7] The virus was developed in Spain, and is beneficial to rabbit farmers. If it were to make its way into wild populations in areas such as Australia, this could create a population boom.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabbits_in_Australia

Toby Christensen
23rd September 09, 04:31 PM
All I know about food down under is that dingos eat babies.

I see...

Do you often use references over 20 years old?

nihilist
23rd September 09, 05:53 PM
Is there improper Aussie food?

That's when dad makes you eat jock steak.

Toby Christensen
23rd September 09, 06:28 PM
You can eat American highschool jocks?

Ajamil
25th September 09, 02:15 PM
Yeah but they always bitch once they sober up and will never admit it in public.