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Neildo
22nd July 09, 03:40 AM
Why does british food have a reputation for being bad? british food is awesome! roast beef and yorkshire pudding with gravy? awesome! fish and chips? awesome! meat pies? come on now, a pie, with fucking meat in it. goddamn, that's pure awesome.

i just whipped up some bangers n mash. i used beef sausages instead of pork though. my onion gravy has me chuffed to bits. this particular dish is practically purpose built to be washed down with beer. delicious.

EuropIan
22nd July 09, 03:42 AM
Mint sauce.....

bob
22nd July 09, 06:00 AM
Why does british food have a reputation for being bad?

You are not eating British food. To be classified as British food it must be cooked by the British with British ingredients.

danno
22nd July 09, 09:46 AM
my dad is a pom (hasn't become australian citizen yet), and this is what he eats: liver with bacon and gravy, black pudding with bacon and eggs, kidney with gravy and sausages. heart with bacon and gravy. all of the above sometimes with toast. pork, roast beef, mashed potatoes, a few vegies boiled until they're mush and the nutrients are practically non existent. never cuts the fat off meat. doesn't drink any water, just beer and cups of tea.

had his first heart attack at 40, and about 14 in total. has diabetes. somehow he managed to turn 60 last year.

my personal problem is that i enjoy all the above food myself.


meat pies? come on now, a pie, with fucking meat in it. goddamn, that's pure awesome.

standard in australia. i eat a lot of the little bastards.

Totemicist
22nd July 09, 10:21 AM
Why does british food have a reputation for being bad? british food is awesome! roast beef and yorkshire pudding with gravy? awesome! fish and chips? awesome! meat pies? come on now, a pie, with fucking meat in it. goddamn, that's pure awesome.

i just whipped up some bangers n mash. i used beef sausages instead of pork though. my onion gravy has me chuffed to bits. this particular dish is practically purpose built to be washed down with beer. delicious.

Mrs Beaton is your answer; that fucking bitch gave us the reputation for over cooking everything we ever consumed including salad.

MSphinx
22nd July 09, 10:57 AM
The only good British food is Chicken Tikka Masala.

Spade: The Real Snake
22nd July 09, 12:03 PM
Whenever I picture "British Food" I picture the lavish spread set out at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry and am inevitably disappointed.

Cullion
22nd July 09, 01:44 PM
British food acquired a reputation for being bad in the latter half of the 19th century when it had previously been relatively well thought of.

This was because huge numbers of people migrated from the countryside to work in polluted cities (a bit like is happening in China now) where fresh meat and vegetables were expensive to get hold of, so people lived on preserved processed meats and stodgy, starchy fillers like pastry, bread and potatos. Bangers and mash. Pies filled with poor quality meat. Vegetables not really fresh so boiled to shit to make them digestable. Yuck.

Just as this was starting to improve a bit with imported produce from the Empire, we had centre-stage in 2 world wars and Germany attempted to starve us into submission by blowing up ships bringing food to the island. Food was rationed, and lots of everyday foods were replaced with synthetic versions like powdered egg. Yuck.

During these 5 or so generations, the British essentially forgot how to cook and instead made it a sort of stoic virtue not to complain when you were served bland, unpalatable food. With the exception of the wealthy, who basically ate the same things rich people ate in Northern France or Germany.

Ordinary brits tentatively started to learn how to cook again in the 60s, and by the mid-90s foreign visitors started to be kind-of pleasantly surprised, sometimes, about the food they were served in British restaurants or served in british homes.

You can eat as well in London as you can in Paris now, but it's still more expensive.

Cullion
22nd July 09, 01:48 PM
Mrs Beaton is your answer; that fucking bitch gave us the reputation for over cooking everything we ever consumed including salad.

Have you actually read Mrs. Beaton's original recipes ?

HappyOldGuy
22nd July 09, 02:50 PM
British food acquired a reputation for being bad in the latter half of the 19th century when it had previously been relatively well thought of.

This was because huge numbers of people migrated from the countryside to work in polluted cities (a bit like is happening in China now) where fresh meat and vegetables were expensive to get hold of, so people lived on preserved processed meats and stodgy, starchy fillers like pastry, bread and potatos. Bangers and mash. Pies filled with poor quality meat. Vegetables not really fresh so boiled to shit to make them digestable. Yuck.

Just as this was starting to improve a bit with imported produce from the Empire, we had centre-stage in 2 world wars and Germany attempted to starve us into submission by blowing up ships bringing food to the island. Food was rationed, and lots of everyday foods were replaced with synthetic versions like powdered egg. Yuck.

During these 5 or so generations, the British essentially forgot how to cook and instead made it a sort of stoic virtue not to complain when you were served bland, unpalatable food. With the exception of the wealthy, who basically ate the same things rich people ate in Northern France or Germany.

Ordinary brits tentatively started to learn how to cook again in the 60s, and by the mid-90s foreign visitors started to be kind-of pleasantly surprised, sometimes, about the food they were served in British restaurants or served in british homes.

You can eat as well in London as you can in Paris now, but it's still more expensive.

This is sorta like what happened to US beer. Except WW's=prohibition.

Neildo
22nd July 09, 03:07 PM
You are not eating British food. To be classified as British food it must be cooked by the British with British ingredients.

i can trace my lineage back to britan. my great grandparents were original pioneers.

i cant call what i eat canadian food because it doesn't contain any moose or maple syrup.

Artful Dentures
22nd July 09, 03:10 PM
WTF is Marmite!?!?

Whats wrong with people who think yeast extract is a food

Cullion
22nd July 09, 03:45 PM
It's mainly something you spread on toast. I've never liked it, but it's rich in vitamin B.

EuropIan
22nd July 09, 03:57 PM
You still have nothing to say about mint sauce other than "it's bloody delicious!" (sic)?

Cullion
22nd July 09, 03:58 PM
The other part of the story is that there are some things British people genuinely like which lots of other people don't, and they aren't eating them just because they have to.

i) We have refrigeration and we serve Lagers cold, because that's the way they are meant to be served. We generally serve traditional English Ales, Bitters and Stouts that have come straight from the cask at room temperature, because that's the way we think they are supposed to be served.

ii) We like organ meats like liver and kidney as long as they are cooked right. Lots of North Americans tend to not like them. I've seen a few change their minds after deciding to be adventurous and try them cooked properly with the right kind of sauce or gravy.

Those are the two main things I've heard people complain about in places where they use good quality ingredients and cook properly. Just don't order them. You can have a steak or some fish instead.

Cullion
22nd July 09, 04:02 PM
You still have nothing to say about mint sauce other than "it's bloody delicious!" (sic)?

Yes, I like bit of mint sauce on roast lamb. Not with anything else.

I completely understand the complaints about sloppily overcooked foods and cheap or synthetic ingredients, that still happens commonly in cheap places. But mint sauce is just one of those things British people like, rather than learned to tolerate out of necessity.

I don't see anything inherently disgusting or unhealthy about having a fresh garden herb chopped up fine in white vinegar to put on some roast meat. It's just something I'm used to I suppose.

The thing about lamb is that it's quite fatty, and the mint/vinegar combo sort of cuts through the fattiness and goes with it. Well, it's personal taste.

EuropIan
22nd July 09, 04:04 PM
I've had some English meat pies and stews that were good...

Cullion
22nd July 09, 04:18 PM
my dad is a pom (hasn't become australian citizen yet), and this is what he eats: liver with bacon and gravy, black pudding with bacon and eggs, kidney with gravy and sausages. heart with bacon and gravy. all of the above sometimes with toast. pork, roast beef, mashed potatoes, a few vegies boiled until they're mush and the nutrients are practically non existent. never cuts the fat off meat. doesn't drink any water, just beer and cups of tea.

Add irish stew, and that's my parents' diet. They don't drink much beer (or much alcohol of any kind) though, and they eat very small portions with no snacks between meals. They're both very lean and in their 70s. No heart trouble yet (touch wood).

HappyOldGuy
22nd July 09, 04:22 PM
ii) We like organ meats like liver and kidney as long as they are cooked right. Lots of North Americans tend to not like them. I've seen a few change their minds after deciding to be adventurous and try them cooked properly with the right kind of sauce or gravy.

They are very easy to do badly. Other than that, don't ask me. Somehow they got equated with poverty food and people stopped eating them in the 50's. Which made their kids not know how to cook them (similar to what you wrote).

Dark Helmet
22nd July 09, 04:30 PM
British food acquired a reputation for being bad in the latter half of the 19th century when it had previously been relatively well thought of.

This was because huge numbers of people migrated from the countryside to work in polluted cities (a bit like is happening in China now) where fresh meat and vegetables were expensive to get hold of, so people lived on preserved processed meats and stodgy, starchy fillers like pastry, bread and potatos. Bangers and mash. Pies filled with poor quality meat. Vegetables not really fresh so boiled to shit to make them digestable. Yuck.

Just as this was starting to improve a bit with imported produce from the Empire, we had centre-stage in 2 world wars and Germany attempted to starve us into submission by blowing up ships bringing food to the island. Food was rationed, and lots of everyday foods were replaced with synthetic versions like powdered egg. Yuck.

During these 5 or so generations, the British essentially forgot how to cook and instead made it a sort of stoic virtue not to complain when you were served bland, unpalatable food. With the exception of the wealthy, who basically ate the same things rich people ate in Northern France or Germany.

Ordinary brits tentatively started to learn how to cook again in the 60s, and by the mid-90s foreign visitors started to be kind-of pleasantly surprised, sometimes, about the food they were served in British restaurants or served in british homes.

You can eat as well in London as you can in Paris now, but it's still more expensive.HBQD3aSZ9R4

Robot Jesus
22nd July 09, 04:39 PM
my favourite thing about Child is that she was a spy

Cullion
22nd July 09, 04:53 PM
And a man wearing a dress, by the look of it.

Virus
22nd July 09, 05:03 PM
Do you eat chips wi' curry sauce Cullion?

Cullion
22nd July 09, 05:17 PM
I don't eat chips that often, when I do it's usually fish and chips just with salt and vinegar. I don't like my chips soggy so I avoid gravy and stuff like that.

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
22nd July 09, 05:25 PM
Fries. They're called fries.

Robot Jesus
22nd July 09, 05:28 PM
try them with cheese curds and gravy.

it the only reason Wolf let the French live

Cullion
22nd July 09, 05:29 PM
Fries. They're called fries.

Fries are the thin quasi-chips you have with a steak, a burger or maybe roast guinea fowl. Not the same. Chips are as thick as your finger.

HappyOldGuy
22nd July 09, 05:31 PM
try them with cheese curds and gravy.

it the only reason Wolf let the French live

Cullion has the unsoggy correct on this one.

Poutine is just a way to hide shitty fries.

High end sportsbar by me does theirs in duckfat. I would fuck someone to death with a pineapple for pouring gravy on them.

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
22nd July 09, 05:31 PM
Those are called steak fries or potato wedges. Chips come in bags with words like "Lays" on the front.

Robot Jesus
22nd July 09, 05:32 PM
Cullion has the unsoggy correct on this one.

Poutine is just a way to hide shitty fries.

High end sportsbar by me does theirs in duckfat. I would fuck someone to death with a pineapple for pouring gravy on them.


no poutine turns fries into a meal. chopped sausage is a nice addition.

Zendetta
22nd July 09, 05:34 PM
High end sportsbar by me does theirs in duckfat.

Hmmm. And what is the name of this establishment?


black pudding

Cullion, can you explain the mysteries of black pudding?

EuropIan
22nd July 09, 05:38 PM
MARUTU BINIGAA

LhXaFUlTwm0

HappyOldGuy
22nd July 09, 05:38 PM
Meridian on university. The fries are awesome, and the rest is actually pretty cool. The food is decent, nice setup, not too noisy, couch area, bar area+tables, but I don't see shattuck and university as a good locale for a yuppie sports bar, so enjoy it while you can.

Cullion
22nd July 09, 05:44 PM
Black pudding is a sausage made out of pigs' blood & fat, oatmeal and onions with maybe some extra flavourings like herbs or garlic varying by who makes it. You slice it up and fry it or grill it.

I like it. It has a meaty, very slightly spicey/peppery taste, but it doesn't really have a meaty texture like a normal sausage, chorizo or salami. It's softer, crumbly and maybe a bit drier.

They have different variations all over Europe btw, like French Boudin etc..
It's just that in the British isles it's a common part of a full cooked breakfast.

See the little dark brown discs at the top right of this plate ? that's how it's normally served.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/images/black_pud_breakfast_300x193.jpg

Harpy
22nd July 09, 05:56 PM
Cullion - do you get annoyed when people constantly refer to misrepresented British food/cuisine and can't see beyond that?

Cullion
22nd July 09, 05:57 PM
Not really, because I know how bad British food can be. It really can be as awful as people imagine it, and it's still easy to find the shitty food I described in my long post about the history of it. Usually in cheap chain pubs or factory canteens where they don't give a shit about the staff.

I don't mind explaining things when people ask. I know what traditional british food made properly from real ingredients tastes like because my grandmother was a cook in an aristocratic household before WWII and I've worked as a silver service waiter in a super-traditional expensive country hotel.

Even the good stuff isn't to everybody's taste because it generally tends to be 'heavy' food intended to keep you warm in cold wet weather. It's not 'the mediterranean diet' that's for sure.

danno
22nd July 09, 07:31 PM
http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/images/black_pud_breakfast_300x193.jpg

yep. That's dad food alright. I only ever eat it when I visit him.

Your parents seem to be doing well. Perhaps I should mention that dad also smokes like a chimney.

I grew up eating a lot of stew too. Often with this delicious bread stuff cooked in the top of it. Don't know if you could call that part British or a more Australian addition.

Lol, just realised my iPhone is capitalising for me...

Dark Helmet
22nd July 09, 08:31 PM
Black pudding is a sausage made out of pigs' blood & fat, oatmeal and onions with maybe some extra flavourings like herbs or garlic varying by who makes it. You slice it up and fry it or grill it.

I like it. It has a meaty, very slightly spicey/peppery taste, but it doesn't really have a meaty texture like a normal sausage, chorizo or salami. It's softer, crumbly and maybe a bit drier.

They have different variations all over Europe btw, like French Boudin etc..
It's just that in the British isles it's a common part of a full cooked breakfast.

See the little dark brown discs at the top right of this plate ? that's how it's normally served.
I enyoy them also. Very good on a sausage platter with various pork products. I've never tried it for breakfast. However, I make them in a stew.

Have you tried cooking them yourelf? It's a pain to keep them from breaking part into mush. Do you have a technique to preparing/cooking them with potato's and carrots.

Harpy
23rd July 09, 12:50 AM
I pretty much hold the opinion that there is no 'British cuisine', just British food. Cuisine suggests to me characteristic techniques, quality produce, art and a pervading culture. In a century or two you may have something of the sort, but for now, I believe it is non-existent when put up against giants such as French, Italian, Chinese, Japanese cuisine as well as the tastes and signature dishes that are presentable on a world stage from a host of countries (Morocco, Spain, Turkey, Thailand, India, Korea, Greece etc.).

Perhaps there was no need to develop haute cuisine as Britain enjoys the varied cuisines that fall under the umbrella of its Empire. No other country can boast that.

Cullion - if you ran a prestigious British hotel what sort of dishes would be on the menu for dinner?

sochin101
23rd July 09, 01:33 AM
standard in australia. i eat a lot of the little bastards.
Pie floater, sir?

They made me LOL.

Cullion
23rd July 09, 02:24 AM
I pretty much hold the opinion that there is no 'British cuisine', just British food. Cuisine suggests to me characteristic techniques, quality produce, art and a pervading culture. In a century or two you may have something of the sort, but for now, I believe it is non-existent when put up against giants such as French, Italian, Chinese, Japanese cuisine as well as the tastes and signature dishes that are presentable on a world stage from a host of countries (Morocco, Spain, Turkey, Thailand, India, Korea, Greece etc.).

We do, but you would struggle to tell the difference between it and Northern French cuisine. There's almost nothing of interest for vegetarians, that's for sure.



Perhaps there was no need to develop haute cuisine as Britain enjoys the varied cuisines that fall under the umbrella of its Empire. No other country can boast that.

We've always had a royal family and an aristocracy. They don't live on bangers and mash. Nor did they rely on French or Italian chefs to cook for them. Most people's idea of 'british food' describes what working class people ate in the 1950s.

Most European countries have absorbed food from their imperial colonies into their own. In France it's North African Cous Cous and Vietnamese food. In Holland it's Indonesian.



Cullion - if you ran a prestigious British hotel what sort of dishes would be on the menu for dinner?

If I wanted to serve specifically 'traditional' things-

Beef Wellington,
Dover Sole,
Norfolk Crab,
Game dishes, often cooked with a slightly sweet sauces made from woodland fruit,
Jugged Hare,
The usual roast meats and poultry.

Neildo
23rd July 09, 03:30 AM
I pretty much hold the opinion that there is no 'British cuisine', just British food. Cuisine suggests to me characteristic techniques, quality produce, art and a pervading culture. In a century or two you may have something of the sort, but for now, I believe it is non-existent when put up against giants such as French, Italian, Chinese, Japanese cuisine as well as the tastes and signature dishes that are presentable on a world stage from a host of countries (Morocco, Spain, Turkey, Thailand, India, Korea, Greece etc.).

i dunno i've been to some pretty fancy joints and they have roast beef and yorkshire pudding prepared by blue ribbon chefs. looked like cuisine to me.




Perhaps there was no need to develop haute cuisine as Britain enjoys the varied
cuisines that fall under the umbrella of its Empire. No other country can boast that.


Canada can. there is no such thing as canadian culture, everyone here is an immigrant.

Virus
23rd July 09, 04:04 AM
What about chips wi' mushy peas? My brother had that and said it's rank.

Cullion
23rd July 09, 02:59 PM
My dad likes mushy peas, I don't.

Ajamil
23rd July 09, 04:15 PM
There's almost nothing of interest for vegetarians, that's for sure.
That's why it's so nice the Indians migrated there.

Cullion
23rd July 09, 04:33 PM
I prefer Thai and Chinese vegetarian dishes usually. Most indian restaurants in the UK serve everything seemingly a little soggy and overcooked to me, with loads of clarified butter.

Zendetta
23rd July 09, 04:42 PM
I think I'm gonna got get some fish and chips.

Blimey!

Artful Dentures
23rd July 09, 05:37 PM
DON'T forget the greatest British epicurean The Earl of Sandwich

Inventor of the Sandwich

We all owe a debt of gratitude to that lazy degenerate gambler

Spade: The Real Snake
23rd July 09, 05:44 PM
Food thread?

let us see...Lily posted?

Check.

OK, all is well. Carry on, then.

DAYoung
23rd July 09, 05:48 PM
Last week, my father took me and my son to lunch at a French deli.

My little boy ate a duck pie: light pastry, spiced, rich meat, and more dense than a singularity (not just sloppy gravy).

I don't know what part of France it was from, but I imagine the British would've enjoyed similar high-quality, well-made, freshly-sourced and baked fare.

Harpy
23rd July 09, 05:53 PM
Cullion - agree with your point about the 'meat heavy' foods and the likeness to Northern French cuisine, the British though, seem to lack the execution when it comes to preparing these dishes. I guess as you say, there is a resurgence in British food (you'll don't lack some great chefs) and I look forward to seeing British food take on a more international following.

Cullion
23rd July 09, 05:54 PM
DAYoung: The pastry would likely be heavier, but yes that sounds like something straight out of the original Mrs. Beatons cookbook.

P.S. Game Pie. Yummy.

http://www.accidentalsmallholder.net/images/diary/gamepiein.jpg

Cullion
23rd July 09, 05:58 PM
Cullion - agree with your point about the 'meat heavy' foods and the likeness to Northern French cuisine, the British though, seem to lack the execution when it comes to preparing these dishes. I guess as you say, there is a resurgence in British food (you'll don't lack some great chefs) and I look forward to seeing British food take on a more international following.

The execution was available to a wealthy minority, although it was a characteristic that simpler preperation was seen as a virtue. The food my grandmother prepared for special occasions for the people she worked for was completely different to what most of the population ate.

In another sense, British food never really lost an international following. People like Neildo all over the commonwealth carried on eating the things their parents and grandparents made.

What didn't happen was a british diaspora to already urbanised societies where large numbers of 'ethnic brits' opened restaurants. Our diaspora tended to arrive either as part of a military force, or as settlers looking to homestead land and farm it.

Much traditionally British food, even if well prepared from good ingredients would probably only appeal to other people living in cool or cold climates anyway. I'd eat little traditional british cooking myself if I lived in a mediterranean or hotter climate. It's just too heavy.

Harpy
23rd July 09, 05:58 PM
(Ewww). Cullion, I'm talking about the techniques and ingredients involved in creating that pie, are they 'British' or borrowed from a different nation?

Cullion
23rd July 09, 06:07 PM
(Ewww). Cullion, I'm talking about the techniques and ingredients involved in creating that pie, are they 'British' or borrowed from a different nation?

In the game pie you mean ?

We've had pheasant, venison and rabbit as part of the diet, and shortcrust pastry, since before recorded history. There are lots of more sophisticated and recent techniques we mostly copied from the French and added some twists like combining sweet and savoury (which the French think is odd about our cooking).

Harpy
23rd July 09, 06:09 PM
I've just learnt something (short crust pastry). Thank you Obi-Wan.

DAYoung
23rd July 09, 06:10 PM
Pastry plus birds, deer, rabbit equals pie.

(And let's not forget hare pie.)

Cullion
23rd July 09, 06:11 PM
Here's a description of the menu at an Elizabethan banquet. Like, obviously, poor people didn't eat like this.

England was certainly no place for vegetarians:-



The Dining Table
"On the table was placed a centre-piece, which represented a green lawn, surrounded with large peacocks' feathers and green branches, to which were tied violets and other sweet-smelling flowers.

In the middle of this lawn a fortress was placed, covered with silver. This was hollow, and formed a sort of cage, in which several live birds were shut up, their tufts and feet being gilt.

On its tower, which was gilt, three banners were placed, one bearing the arms of the count, the two others those of Mesdemoiselles de Châteaubrun and de Villequier, in whose honour the feast was given."

The First Course
"The first course consisted of a civet of hare, a quarter of stag which had been a night in salt, a stuffed chicken, and a loin of veal.

The two last dishes were covered with a German sauce, with gilt sugar-plums, and pomegranate seeds....

At each end, outside the green lawn, was an enormous pie, surmounted with smaller pies, which formed a crown. The crust of the large ones was silvered all round and gilt at the top; each contained a whole roe-deer, a gosling, three capons, six chickens, ten pigeons, one young rabbit

To serve as seasoning or stuffing, a minced loin of veal, two pounds of fat, and twenty-six hard-boiled eggs, covered with saffron and flavoured with cloves.

The Second Course
...There was a roe-deer, a pig, a sturgeon cooked in parsley and vinegar, and covered with powdered ginger; a kid, two goslings, twelve chickens, as many pigeons, six young rabbits, two herons, a leveret, a fat capon stuffed, four chickens covered with yolks of eggs and sprinkled with powder de Duc (spice), a wild boar

The Third Course
..Some wafers (darioles), and stars; a jelly, part white and part red, representing the crests of the main guests

The Fourth Course
..Cream with Duc powder, covered with fennel seeds preserved in sugar; a white cream, cheese in slices, and strawberries; and, lastly, plums stewed in rose-water.

The Fifth Course
Besides these four courses, there was a fifth, entirely composed of the prepared wines then in vogue, and of preserves. These consisted of fruits and various sweet pastries. The pastries represented stags and swans, to the necks of which were suspended the arms of the Count of Anjou ..."

Cullion
23rd July 09, 06:20 PM
Some more:-



Banquet for four

Baked Eels
Compund Sallet
Chickin Pie Piggs Petitoes
Fritters of Spinnedge
Finer Jumbals
Candied Roots, fruits or flowers.

Elizabethan Banquet for ten

Livering Puddings Fartes of Portingale
Compund Sallet
Capon with Orenges Olive pie
Pudding in a turnip root Articoak pye
Warden Pie
Candied Roots, fruits of flowers

Elizabethan Banquet for twenty

Rack of veale on the French Fashion
Compaound Sallet
Pudding in a Tench Minst Pye
Quelquechose:Oyster lamb Casserole
Lumbardy Tarts Tart of Beanes
Spinnage Tart Course ginger Bread
Candied Roots fruits or Flowers

Harpy
23rd July 09, 06:23 PM
Heart attack city.

DAYoung
23rd July 09, 06:24 PM
The first looks like a set of 'How Do Constipation and Bowel Cancer' instructions.

I'm hoping this feast was rare...

Cullion
23rd July 09, 06:25 PM
You've seen portraits of Henry VIII.

http://www.rarebookreview.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/03/henry_viii.jpg

He wasn't a man to be interrupted when pork-chop was on the table.

DAYoung
23rd July 09, 06:40 PM
Just big boned.

Cullion
23rd July 09, 06:41 PM
You might have a point.

DAYoung
23rd July 09, 07:04 PM
And the easel adds ten kilos.

socratic
23rd July 09, 08:28 PM
[meat pies are] standard in australia. i eat a lot of the little bastards.

I think Mrs Mac has been lieing to us.

DAYoung
23rd July 09, 08:35 PM
'Meat' pies.

socratic
23rd July 09, 10:06 PM
WTF is Marmite!?!?

Whats wrong with people who think yeast extract is a food

Another Australian staple under the name 'vegemite'.



Canada can. there is no such thing as canadian culture, everyone here is an immigrant.

Same with Australia; unless you're Indigenous, but chances are unless you're Indigenous and live in an indigenous community you won't be eating Aboriginal 'cuisine'. Everyone else is an immigrant. My father tells me stories of what it was like before serious cuisine culture was imported into Australia; if you didn't eat cheese sandwiches for lunch at school you were a 'filthy wog'. Spices unheard of. My father's father sold textiles to Asian nations, and routinely ate the most insane and unheard-of elements of their dining culture [as much as you can when you're visiting third-world countries] yet at home ate steak and very little plantlife.

socratic
23rd July 09, 10:07 PM
'Meat' pies.
'Sausage' rolls.

DAYoung
23rd July 09, 10:19 PM
Exactly.

When I think of sausage rolls, I can only remember the tang of tomato sauce, barely veiling the waxy taste of grease.

danno
24th July 09, 01:45 AM
you like a bit of sausage, don't you DAY? like getting a bit of pork into you? enjoy a few inches of spicy beef on the odd occasion?

DAYoung
24th July 09, 01:58 AM
That does sound good.

But I much prefer an ardent, vascular penis.

Lol rom0 ssexual111!!!

bob
24th July 09, 02:32 AM
There's nothing like sitting down to a nice meat pie and finding a big chunky bit of artery there. That's how you can be sure they're using real animals.

DAYoung
24th July 09, 02:41 AM
Great with a chianti and fava beans...

bob
24th July 09, 02:43 AM
Liver is a sometimes food.

Neildo
24th July 09, 02:47 AM
my dad always contemplates and more often than not orders liver and onions whenever we eat at a restaurant that serves it. i always have to sceptically ask him how it is and he always likes it. i've only had it once and i'm really not a big fan. organ meat in general. i know it's better for you than the muscle tissue but it just doesn't taste as good to me, and i'm not a big fan of the texture either.

DAYoung
24th July 09, 02:54 AM
Liver is pretty tasty, I have to say. My dad likes to chow on lamb's brains - I can't quite do it...

honesty
24th July 09, 03:44 AM
British food does also vary massively on the region you are in. I'm originally from Leicestershire, and you wouldn't get through a picnic without a few pork pies there. Another dish not mentioned so far would be a hot pot, traditionally from the Midlands and the north. There's also speicific regional cakes and pastries, like a bakewell tart or eccles cakes.

A lot of these now traditional dishes came about because of the need to use up the ends of food. Food waste was not something that happened in the industrial revolution through to about the mid 60's in Britain. The hotpot is a good example of this, as is a pudding like a bread and butter pudding.

Ajamil
24th July 09, 12:57 PM
Never liked any type of liver, the taste, texture, and overall idea of eating the body's poison filter never agreed with me. Never had kidney, but I enjoyed cow stomach and small intestine, and I love me some chicken hearts and gizzards. Turkey neck should never be.

EuropIan
24th July 09, 01:06 PM
Liver is very good for you.

http://www.denofgeek.com/siteimage/scale/800/600/37494.png

Zendetta
24th July 09, 03:16 PM
What, no mention of the "Ploughman's Lunch"?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ploughman%27s_Lunch

Ajamil
24th July 09, 03:29 PM
That didn't fully load the first time and all I saw was that hair. I thought it was MJ in werewolf form during Thriller.

http://www.evilontwolegs.com/uploads/corey/top10werewolves/thriller_3.jpg

socratic
25th July 09, 04:06 AM
Liver is pretty tasty, I have to say. My dad likes to chow on lamb's brains - I can't quite do it...

One theory I heard for how mad cow disease got started was from eating brains. A lot of very nasty diseases get spread that way.

Cullion
25th July 09, 04:13 AM
Yeah, I don't think you can buy brains for human consumption in the UK any more for that reason.

The people who caught mad cow disease caught it from processed meat like burgers that had tissue from the brain and spinal column mixed in. The cows caught it from animal feed that had cow and sheep central nervous tissue in it.

DAYoung
25th July 09, 04:17 AM
A great loss to the culinary world.

Cullion
25th July 09, 04:29 AM
I have to side with the organic hippies on this one. Cows and sheep are herbivores. Feeding cows on dead cows, wtf were they thinking?

DAYoung
25th July 09, 04:33 AM
They were thinking about transforming cheap feed into expensive meat.

For da moneeeee...

Zendetta
25th July 09, 02:09 PM
The shit that causes the mad cowz is weird.

Its not even a virus, just some evil twisted protein from hell.

DAYoung
25th July 09, 05:11 PM
Don't taunt the prions, Zendetta.

Artful Dentures
26th July 09, 10:19 AM
Not only that but cows shouldn't be fed corn and grain, they eat grass, Corn feed is bad for them and that's why they supplement it with other cow protein

Blech!!

Organic grass fed beef is the only way to go

Cullion
26th July 09, 10:37 AM
I totally agree. I don't notice it as much with vegetables, but being naturalistic and hippyish about fish and meat makes a big difference in quality. The UK is pretty good for that these days, primarily because our livestock farmers can't really compete on price, so they have to try and aim upmarket.

Our supermarkets tend to have lower quality and overpriced fruit and vegetables than they do in France or Italy though, even the imported stuff, which I don't fully understand.

Cullion
26th July 09, 10:41 AM
What, no mention of the "Ploughman's Lunch"?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ploughman%27s_Lunch

Oh that's a favourite of mine in a beer garden on a warm day, with a pint of lukewarm bitter or ale. It's so simple, I didn't really think of it as a 'recipe' as such, but it is one of our classics.

Cullion
2nd August 09, 11:57 AM
P.S. I don't believe what it says in the wikipedia page about how recent an idea the Ploughman's lunch is.

The same sort of meal (some fresh fruit and vegetables, some bread and hard cheese) is found all over Europe. I've seen an old Italian shepard's lunch, and it was just a couple of fresh tomatoes, a small onion, a small loaf of bread and a chunk of some kind of hard cheese, which he then cut up with his pocket knife.
Some of the contiental versions of this kind of meal involve dried salami-type sausage, but we never really produced that kind of long-storage preserved meat in the UK.

Adding pickle and serving it with beer just seems like a British take on a very old-fashioned Europe-wide lunch that somebody who works in the country can easily carry with them when they're walking around all day. It's like the obvious stuff to take with you for lunch before tupperware was invented. I bet bread + fruit & veg + cheese was being carried around 3000 years ago.

Artful Dentures
2nd August 09, 02:35 PM
Another thing about Organic meat regarding the price is that, yes it is more expensive

HOWEVER

it's not bloated with water and food colouring to make it look bigger

For example the T-Bone steak I buy is a bout $18 for one serving.

It doesn't shrink when I BBQ it and I can feed realistically three people from one steak cause they are huge

Tso I can buy a chep rib grilling steak at the supermarket for about $4 each and feed 3 people for $12 or an $18 steak that feed three and costs $2 more per person.

The quality and lack of hormones and anti-bodies makes the $6 difference worth it.

Same thing with the chicken breast I buy, they don't shrink.

Spade: The Real Snake
2nd August 09, 11:13 PM
What, no mention of the "Ploughman's Lunch"?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ploughman%27s_Lunch

Fucking hell.

Do they serve it with an Airwick to deaden the underleg stench?

Cullion
3rd August 09, 06:08 PM
^ whut?

It's just bread, cheese, some salad stuff, pickle (relish as you call it) and maybe an apple.

Harpy
3rd August 09, 06:24 PM
Snake's just bitter because he was plowed by the Ploughman and expected a phone call afterwards.

Big Dozer
10th August 09, 12:15 PM
Why does british food have a reputation for being bad? british food is awesome! roast beef and yorkshire pudding with gravy? awesome! fish and chips? awesome! meat pies? come on now, a pie, with fucking meat in it. goddamn, that's pure awesome.

i just whipped up some bangers n mash. i used beef sausages instead of pork though. my onion gravy has me chuffed to bits. this particular dish is practically purpose built to be washed down with beer. delicious.

Well do you like having spotted dick in your mouth?

Cullion
10th August 09, 01:28 PM
It's delicious. It needs to be gulped down with a lot of custard.

Big Dozer
10th August 09, 01:29 PM
I understand that spotted dick can be quite sticky though

Cullion
10th August 09, 01:37 PM
It depends on whether grandma has cold hands or not.

Spade: The Real Snake
12th August 09, 04:29 PM
Fucking hell.

Do they serve it with an Airwick to deaden the underleg stench?

I also saw a raw onion, hard-boiled egg, pate and beets listed.

Spade: The Real Snake
12th August 09, 04:30 PM
Snake's just bitter because he was plowed by the Ploughman and expected a phone call afterwards.

Shouldn't you be yoked up with a fat farmer waddling behind you?

Harpy
12th August 09, 06:25 PM
The axle broke.

Which reminds me, I somehow caught a few minutes of American Iron Chef on tv last weekend. Some faggot was making veal sorbet. WTF? *puke*

Ajamil
12th August 09, 11:43 PM
That's right up there with liver parfait.

Harpy
13th August 09, 12:01 AM
*vomit*
Reminds me of a documentary I watched years ago about a South American woman who believed that starvation need not exist and we should look at various food sources.

She wrote a whole cook book based around 'maggots'.

Ajamil
13th August 09, 12:32 AM
People would would delight in eating them if they were ten inches long and came from the ocean.

Cullion
13th August 09, 01:23 AM
I also saw a raw onion, hard-boiled egg, pate and beets listed.

Pate isn't a normal part of a ploughmans. The basics are bread, cheese, pickle and some salad veggies.

Spade: The Real Snake
13th August 09, 09:53 AM
Pate isn't a normal part of a ploughmans. The basics are bread, cheese, pickle and some salad veggies.

That's fine.
Just no fucking raw onion...jesus, what are we, Bulgarians?

Cullion
13th August 09, 09:55 AM
You're one of those people who finds garlic 'suspicious', aren't you ?

Spade: The Real Snake
13th August 09, 10:05 AM
You're one of those people who finds garlic 'suspicious', aren't you ?

I have a delicate constitution.

Ajamil
13th August 09, 10:51 AM
Ever hear of asafoetida, or hing? Good onion substitute.

Harpy
13th August 09, 08:46 PM
That's fine.
Just no fucking raw onion...jesus, what are we, Bulgarians?

I'm with you on that one Snake. Down with RAW ONIONS (gotta be battered and deep fried for me).

honesty
14th August 09, 03:16 AM
Spring onions are great on a ploughmans lunch.

Didn't the raw onions conversation already happen somewhere here already?

Cullion
14th August 09, 04:13 AM
I have a delicate constitution.

Oh yeah, sorry, I remember now. You're the dude who has to stick to poultry because of his stomach trouble. Can you eat game birds like Pheasant or Grouse?

Kiko
4th January 11, 03:34 PM
Thanks for re-linking this, Neil! It's um... educational in so many ways!

Adouglasmhor
4th January 11, 04:05 PM
Pate isn't a normal part of a ploughmans. The basics are bread, cheese, pickle and some salad veggies.

Pate makes it a Frenchmans lunch.

Dr. Socially Liberal Fiscally Conservative Vermin
5th January 11, 07:15 AM
wasnt the ploughman's lunch invented by Branston Pickle for an advertising campaign?

Lollius Urbicus
5th January 11, 08:28 AM
wasnt the ploughman's lunch invented by Branston Pickle for an advertising campaign?
I seem to remember something about the British cheese board. I'm sure the combination of bread, cheese, pickle and a pint has been around in various forms for a while though.

Cullion
5th January 11, 08:46 AM
Bread cheese, vegetables and something pickled as a meal is found across Europe and has been for centuries. Using branston pickle and calling it a 'ploughmans' could easily be new.