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Sirc
10th May 09, 09:23 PM
Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul. Lo-lee-ta: the tip of the tongue taking a trip of three steps down the palate to tap, at three, on the teeth. Lo. Lee. Ta. She was Lo, plain Lo, in the morning, standing four feet ten in one sock. She was Lola in slacks. She was Dolly at school. She was Dolores on the dotted line. But in my arms she was always Lolita. Did she have a precursor? She did, indeed she did. In point of fact, there might have been no Lolita at all had I not loved, one summer, an initial girl-child. In a princedom by the sea. Oh when? About as many years before Lolita was born as my age was that summer. You can always count on a murderer for fancy prose style. Ladies and gentlemen of the jury, exhibit number one is what the seraphs, the misinformed, simple, noble-winged seraphs, envied. Look at this tangle of thorns.


Usually I try to read a novel a week. I average about .75 novels a week, but over the last 2 weeks I've only read 1 book. Lolita. Lo-lee-ta. It is a book that you must slowly read to fully understand how brilliant it is. How beautiful it is. And how wonderful it is.

The entire book is like watching someone do a ballet with the English language. Every Nobakov book that I read makes me feel so disgusting and burlesque by how average my handle of the written English language is. It isn't my first spoken or written language, but neither was it for him.

If you haven't read this, read it. It. Is. So. Amazing.

I cannot express, not even in the slightest, how brilliant Nobakov is. I cannot tell you how much I want to consume the wordplay, the puns and the amazing syntax that fills this book up with its beautiful and wonderful wordsmithing. What a wonderful, wonderful book.

Read it. Or don't, whatever your loss.

Ajamil
10th May 09, 09:46 PM
Tits or GTFO?

Seriously tho, this should be on my list, I know. I'll probably see if I can find it as an audio book. I seem to get into the classics better when they're read to me than if I read them myself.

Sirc
10th May 09, 10:14 PM
Tits or GTFO?

Seriously tho, this should be on my list, I know. I'll probably see if I can find it as an audio book. I seem to get into the classics better when they're read to me than if I read them myself.

Do you use torrents?

I have torrents.

If not, I can see about uploading it to a file server.

Ajamil
10th May 09, 10:24 PM
I love using torrents, the wireless provider I use, does not. If I truly wanted to spring for cox, I'd hop on that shit as soon as possible, but right now the $30 a month less I pay is worth not having a static IP. I can always come to the gliderport and stea...err, upload public files through their wifi.

Sirc
10th May 09, 10:30 PM
http://static.open.salon.com/files/truth_about_cats_and_dogs_i1229954876.jpg

Enjoy. Audiobook.


[Moderator's note: NO FILE SHARING, SIRC!]

Sirc
10th May 09, 10:35 PM
I heard that it's corrupted though so torrent:

http://pajamajournalist.com/napping-puppies-and-kittens.jpg


[Moderator's note: NO FILE SHARING, SIRC!]

Ajamil
11th May 09, 12:10 AM
Many thanks, o creepy-eyed one of the long-chins.

MBG
11th May 09, 01:40 AM
Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul. Lo-lee-ta: the tip of the tongue taking a trip of three steps down the palate to tap, at three, on the teeth. Lo. Lee. Ta. She was Lo, plain Lo, in the morning, standing four feet ten in one sock. She was Lola in slacks. She was Dolly at school. She was Dolores on the dotted line. But in my arms she was always Lolita. Did she have a precursor? She did, indeed she did. In point of fact, there might have been no Lolita at all had I not loved, one summer, an initial girl-child. In a princedom by the sea. Oh when? About as many years before Lolita was born as my age was that summer. You can always count on a murderer for fancy prose style. Ladies and gentlemen of the jury, exhibit number one is what the seraphs, the misinformed, simple, noble-winged seraphs, envied. Look at this tangle of thorns.


Usually I try to read a novel a week. I average about .75 novels a week, but over the last 2 weeks I've only read 1 book. Lolita. Lo-lee-ta. It is a book that you must slowly read to fully understand how brilliant it is. How beautiful it is. And how wonderful it is.

The entire book is like watching someone do a ballet with the English language. Every Nobakov book that I read makes me feel so disgusting and burlesque by how average my handle of the written English language is. It isn't my first spoken or written language, but neither was it for him.

If you haven't read this, read it. It. Is. So. Amazing.

I cannot express, not even in the slightest, how brilliant Nobakov is. I cannot tell you how much I want to consume the wordplay, the puns and the amazing syntax that fills this book up with its beautiful and wonderful wordsmithing. What a wonderful, wonderful book.

Read it. Or don't, whatever your loss.

Someone finally fucking agrees with me about Lolita (and Nabokov). All the tards where I live say one of three things when I mention this:
"I've never heard of it"
"Isn't that book about pedophilia?"
or "If you like stories about love, you should read twilight."

billy sol hurok
11th May 09, 07:12 AM
By gum, there's hope for you yet Sirc.

Any chance the audio version was read by James Mason?

Kubrick's version was deeply flawed -- how could it not be? -- but Mason was brilliant. And Sellers as Quilty was darkly hilarious, maybe his most underrated performance. Even the blowsy, baying Shelly Winters was used to perfection.

bob
11th May 09, 07:23 AM
A fine, fine book.

Sirc
11th May 09, 07:33 AM
By gum, there's hope for you yet Sirc.

Any chance the audio version was read by James Mason?

Kubrick's version was deeply flawed -- how could it not be? -- but Mason was brilliant. And Sellers as Quilty was darkly hilarious, maybe his most underrated performance. Even the blowsy, baying Shelly Winters was used to perfection.

No. Even better, the book is read ENTIRELY by Jeremy Irons, I've come to find out.

The funny thing about it though is that my internal voice has been Jeremy Irons' voice over the last month.5

I can't get it out of my head and everything that I read in my head is his voice. :\

jnp
11th May 09, 08:59 AM
I anxiously await your discovery of Dostoyevsky next. Followed by some Turgenyev, Gogol, Pushkin and Solzhenitsyn. All amazing authors, well except for Solzhenitsyn. He's a bit pedantic in my opinion.

billy sol hurok
11th May 09, 09:08 AM
No. Even better, the book is read ENTIRELY by Jeremy Irons, I've come to find out.
Seems like a good choice; he's done the unhealthily obsessed brit prig act (http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0104237/) before (in a Louis Malle film: there's your pedo connection). Not a great movie, but luscious Juliette Binoche.

JohnnyCache
11th May 09, 10:00 AM
You're gushing about the elegance and wordplay of a translated novel?

You need some Ginsberg in your life.

billy sol hurok
11th May 09, 11:33 AM
Pretty sure he wrote that in English. Yep. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lolita)

Like Conrad, he puts us to shame in a secondary language.

But big up Ginsberg, et al.

Spade: The Real Snake
11th May 09, 12:36 PM
No. Even better, the book is read ENTIRELY by Jeremy Irons, I've come to find out.

The funny thing about it though is that my internal voice has been Jeremy Irons' voice over the last month.5

I can't get it out of my head and everything that I read in my head is his voice. :\


Seems like a good choice; he's done the unhealthily obsessed brit prig act (http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0104237/) before (in a Louis Malle film: there's your pedo connection). Not a great movie, but luscious Juliette Binoche.



WHODATHUNKIT?? (http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0119558/)

Sirc
11th May 09, 12:47 PM
You're gushing about the elegance and wordplay of a translated novel?

You need some Ginsberg in your life.

He wrote it in english.

Sirc
11th May 09, 01:42 PM
Who the hell changed the title?

Spade: The Real Snake
11th May 09, 01:42 PM
Who the hell changed the title?

A man more modest then you?

billy sol hurok
11th May 09, 02:01 PM
WHODATHUNKIT?? (http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0119558/)
D'oh!

I'd completely blocked the fact that Lyne had a run at it. Amazing how the body can reflexively protect itself from pathogens . . .

Was it watchable, anyone?

Spade: The Real Snake
11th May 09, 02:04 PM
D'oh!

I'd completely blocked the fact that Lyne had a run at it. Amazing how the body can reflexively protect itself from pathogens . . .

Was it watchable, anyone?

I recalled it was BANNED for the longest time.
We watched it but I have no real recollection of it, we watched it the same night as Cronenberg's eXistenZ and all I remember of that one is the "chickenbone gun".

Ajamil
11th May 09, 05:06 PM
I anxiously await your discovery of Dostoyevsky next. Followed by some Turgenyev, Gogol, Pushkin and Solzhenitsyn. All amazing authors, well except for Solzhenitsyn. He's a bit pedantic in my opinion.

Actually just picked up Crime and Punishment again!

Shawarma
13th May 09, 08:44 AM
Never bothered to read Lolita although I saw the film once. Didn't find the subject matter all that interesting, for some reason.

I like Conrad, though. HoD is a better book than most people think, IMO.

billy sol hurok
13th May 09, 09:07 AM
I recalled it was BANNED for the longest time.

As in, couldn't get an R rating?



We watched it but I have no real recollection of it, we watched it the same night as Cronenberg's eXistenZ and all I remember of that one is the "chickenbone gun".

I saw that piffle in the theater. Must have been a slow weekend -- and I'm sure that didn't help, as I can't remember anything about it. Well, apart from a disinclination to paying for Cronenberg films without some prior vetting. "The Fly," it was not. Hell, it wasn't even "Red Dingers."

RaiNnyX4
13th May 09, 09:41 AM
Nabokov is my favorite writer. I'm currently reading Pnin. It's not nearly as good as Lolita or Invitation to a Beheading, but the Nabokov flair is there.

Spade: The Real Snake
13th May 09, 10:23 AM
As in, couldn't get an R rating?
I think it got an NC-17 and it had trouble finding a distributor





I saw that piffle in the theater. Must have been a slow weekend -- and I'm sure that didn't help, as I can't remember anything about it. Well, apart from a disinclination to paying for Cronenberg films without some prior vetting. "The Fly," it was not. Hell, it wasn't even "Red Dingers."

We saw Cronenberg's Crash in the theatres. Man, that was heady.

mrblackmagic
14th May 09, 06:53 PM
I remember the trailer as a wee lad. I think it was the R rated edit.


Actually just picked up Crime and Punishment again!

I'm 44 pages into House of the Dead and I'm pretty damn impressed.

jnp
19th May 09, 12:48 AM
Typing of Dostoevsky, if you liked Crime and Punishment read The Idiot. Masterfully written while being less grandiose than The Brothers Karamazov.

In some ways, Sirc reminds me of Julien Sorel, the protagonist in Stendhal's novel, The Red and the Black.

Sirc
19th May 09, 03:08 AM
Never bothered to read Lolita although I saw the film once. Didn't find the subject matter all that interesting, for some reason.

I like Conrad, though. HoD is a better book than most people think, IMO.

I just watched the movie last weekend. The only thing it has in common is the subject, the name and the character's names. I wasn't sure how they planned on making it translate to movie.

The entire point of the book is language. Read the book and stop trying to god damn hard to be the "outsider with a chip on his shoulder" you're a faggot for doing it but don't realize it because you're stupid.


Nabokov is my favorite writer. I'm currently reading Pnin. It's not nearly as good as Lolita or Invitation to a Beheading, but the Nabokov flair is there.

I have to add that to the list. I'm currently reading Pale Fire, right now. MIND IS FUCKING BLOWN.


Typing of Dostoevsky, if you liked Crime and Punishment read The Idiot. Masterfully written while being less grandiose than The Brothers Karamazov.

In some ways, Sirc reminds me of Julien Sorel, the protagonist in Stendhal's novel, The Red and the Black.

I'll add that to the list too.

Zendetta
19th May 09, 03:17 PM
I like Conrad, though. HoD is a better book than most people think, IMO.

QFT. One of my favorites books.

The Horror... the horror...

bob
19th May 09, 04:32 PM
One of the few examples of the movie being better than the book IMO.