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Robot Jesus
18th March 09, 06:20 AM
was watching food network, Ramsey was working on an idian reasteraunt. Can someone familiar with indian food explane the basics. what are common dishes, what are common service options? cooking methods would be good to.

I am completly infamiliar with this style of cooking.

Virus
18th March 09, 06:26 AM
I just buy jars of carry flavoring and use that.

http://www.thomasgreen.fr/france/lille/shop/images_products/92.jpg

Robot Jesus
18th March 09, 06:48 AM
I just buy jars of carry flavoring and use that.

http://www.thomasgreen.fr/france/lille/shop/images_products/92.jpg
thats not cooking, thats opening jars.

Madgrenade
18th March 09, 08:11 AM
Just chuck some milk and water in a pan, add a bit of sugar, then add your spice. Heat it up a bit, pinch of salt, then add your sliced chicken/ lamb whatever. Heat it until it starts to boil off/ the meat is cooked through, the slap it on top of some rice and Bob's your Uncle. If it doesn't smell nice then you've used the wrong spices and need to add some more. Experiment.

Shawarma
18th March 09, 09:21 AM
Truth. Curry's fun to mess around with and hard to screw up so badly as to be inedible.

Craigypooh
18th March 09, 10:36 AM
If you don't want to use jars then you'll need the following spices:
Bay Leaves
Cardamom Pods
Cayenne Pepper
Cinammon
Coriander
Cumin
Fennel Seeds
Fenugreek Seeds
Garam Masala
Paprika
Black Pepper
Turmeric

Lots of recipes can be found on the interwebz.

Zendetta
18th March 09, 10:39 AM
I've made red, yellow, and green curries, thai-style, from scratch.

I'll tell you when I get out of class.

HappyOldGuy
18th March 09, 11:34 AM
Important point. Curry = stew. It's not a specific recipe. Some curries are based on coconut milk. Others on yogurt. Some on ghee (clarified butter) And others on stock or water. And despite the existence of "curry powder," there is no common set of spices even just in indian cooking.

The quick easy dirty and tasty method for "thai" style curries is to go to a local asian market and pick up a can of coconut milk and a can of thai curry paste (yellow, red, or green). Fry up some meat and veggies, and then simmer them in the coconut milk and a teaspoon or two of the curry paste. Making your own curry paste is possible, but I almost never do.

Zendetta
18th March 09, 12:14 PM
The quick easy dirty and tasty method for "thai" style curries is to go to a local asian market and pick up a can of coconut milk and a can of thai curry paste (yellow, red, or green). Fry up some meat and veggies, and then simmer them in the coconut milk and a teaspoon or two of the curry paste. Making your own curry paste is possible, but I almost never do.

That certainly works. I like to put the blob of curry paste into just a little bit of coconut milk, and cook it a bit first, using the milk as oil. It should be "almost burned, but not burned" (in the words of my thai cooking teacher) and making your kitchen very fragrant before you put in the meat and veggies.

Aphid Jones
18th March 09, 09:18 PM
That certainly works. I like to put the blob of curry paste into just a little bit of coconut milk, and cook it a bit first, using the milk as oil. It should be "almost burned, but not burned" (in the words of my thai cooking teacher) and making your kitchen very fragrant before you put in the meat and veggies.
So HOG seemed to indicate that you cook the vegetables before putting in the coconut milk and chili paste. Is it better to make the paste-coconut milk mixture first to get the "almost burned" effect you're talking about?

Zendetta
18th March 09, 09:30 PM
yes, precisely. Cook the paste a bit before adding the meat and veggies. Sniffing the cooking pot at that point should be like getting a mild dose of pepper spray.

WarPhalange
18th March 09, 09:39 PM
yes, precisely. Cook the paste a bit before adding the meat and veggies. Sniffing the cooking pot at that point should be like getting a mild dose of pepper spray.

Ugh, at our school's fast-food court, we have a Chinese place. I don't know what the hell they use, but it has the same result. The sauce is really like sweet and sour, but it's pure after-taste. Not really sweet or sour.

Robot Jesus
21st March 09, 07:47 PM
the local chinese food institution has the ready made meals sold at local gorcery stores with that problem. I assume it's due to overuse of preservatives, their sweet and sour sauce tastes great in the reastaraunt.

Cullion
22nd March 09, 06:12 PM
For instructions on making Indian food at home google for 'Madhur Jaffrey'.
She taught a generation of brits how to make Indian curries at home.

The tastiest Indian curry I've ever had was made by a friend who was part Indian. It was just mildly spicy and involved chicken cooked on the bone, natural yoghurt and lots of coriander. I tend to prefer the indian recipes that are based on natural yoghurt instead of the ghee butter, it just tastes a bit fresher and healthier to me.

If you're going to try to cook totally from fresh ingredients, I find Thai-style curries easier and faster. I also prefer them a bit to indian curries these days, but my tastes might change back. Thai curries are quite different from Indian curries. They're mostly coconut-milk based, and tend to be based on quite a different combo of spices (using stuff like lemon grass and strong Thai ginger called Galangal, and palm sugar). They tend on average to be more hot and spicy and not to have such a thick sauce.

Indian curries also often use different vegetables. Filling vegetables like lentils and other pulses, spinach and root vegetables are common.

Aphid Jones
22nd March 09, 08:38 PM
For instructions on making Indian food at home google for 'Madhur Jaffrey'.
She taught a generation of brits how to make Indian curries at home.

Actually, I have one of her books...

Still can't make indian food properly.

DAYoung
22nd March 09, 09:00 PM
I just buy jars of carry flavoring and use that.

http://www.thomasgreen.fr/france/lille/shop/images_products/92.jpg

The cooking equivalent of LARPing.

No, no: it's the cooking equivalent of organised religion - just taking up and using what's created by someone else.