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TheMightyMcClaw
22nd January 09, 04:26 PM
In my constant quest for cheap, easily prepared, and not-too-unhealthy foods, I've been delving into the world of legumes lately. As such, I picked up a couple bags of lentils at the grocery store today.
Following the instructions of the bag, I cooked up my first pot of them this afternoon. Thing is, not traditionally being much of a lentil eater, I'm unsure as to how to serve and season them. Should I throw them in a soup? Mash them up? Mix them with miscellaneous vegetables?
I had a bowl or two seasoned with lemon pepper, and that was not bad, but I feel I can do better.
Any advice from the chefs of bullshido?

Zendetta
22nd January 09, 04:36 PM
Nourishing, cheap, a little time consuming to cook.

As a bonus, the people you roll with will quickly come to dread being under you in north-south position due to a fear of tapping to your horrid flatulence.

Aphid Jones
22nd January 09, 05:03 PM
Egyptian Koshari


1-2 cups brown and/or white rice
2 cups lentils
2 cups pasta of your choice
Enough Salt to season each grain
Vegetable Oil, Olive and/or Sesame oil

1 large white or yellow onion

Sauce:

1.5-2 16-ounce cans of crushed tomatoes
1 tbs Tumeric
1 tbs Chili Powder
1 tsp Cayenne Pepper
1 tsp Garlic Powder
1/2 tsp Cumin
1/2 tsp salt
1 drop of honey
dash of black pepper

optional: 1/2 tsp coriander.


Prepare rice, lentils, and pasta separately according to directions (adding a little olive oil or sesame oil in each). Set aside each in large bowls if you want to have them out conveniently.


Cut the onion coarsely into strips and fry in a medium saucepan on medium-high heat in 1 tbs vegetable oil and 1 tbs olive oil until translucent and browning. Strain out onions and set them aside (in a small bowl, if you want to have them out conveniently.)


Put the two cans of crushed tomatoes into the still-oiled saucepan you used to fry the onions in. Add in all spices listed under "sauce" to taste, stir and heat on low for 10-15 minutes (try not to let it boil very much.)


To serve: Place one layer of rice, one layer of lentils, and one layer of pasta into a bowl. Top with sauce, and then some of the fried onions.

Aphid Jones
22nd January 09, 05:07 PM
The best-tasting lentils are always small, round, and dark brown or black. These lentils have a rich, grain taste and retain their shape and texture.

Orange (Red) lentils dissolve into a texture many find unpleasant; the most common Green lentils are too flat and have a grassy taste. When in doubt, get the black.

partyboy
22nd January 09, 05:18 PM
^ racist

TheMightyMcClaw
22nd January 09, 05:23 PM
The best-tasting lentils are always small, round, and dark brown or black. These lentils have a rich, grain taste and retain their shape and texture.

Orange (Red) lentils dissolve into a texture many find unpleasant; the most common Green lentils are too flat and have a grassy taste. When in doubt, get the black.

I had some red lentils that dissolved into a sort of mush, and I actually found it rather enjoyable.

billy sol hurok
22nd January 09, 06:26 PM
Google dal/dahl/daal.

Also, my wife makes a spicy lentil soup with barley: very warming and filling.

I use lentils to make faux veggie chopped liver, in conjunction with walnuts, peas and fried onions. Very handy for a quick snack or meal, and pretty damn good (for something you could serve a vegan).

Aphid Jones
22nd January 09, 06:59 PM
I had some red lentils that dissolved into a sort of mush, and I actually found it rather enjoyable.
It can be, but it's more for pastes, curries, etc.

TheMightyMcClaw
30th January 09, 12:04 AM
So, since my initial post, lentils have rapidly become the primary staple in my diet.
I've generally found the easiest way for me to eat them is to boil up a bag of them, throw them in a tupperware container, and chomp away for the next couple days.
Twenty minutes of cooking (most of which can be spent making chainmail/playing DS), which provides me with half a weeks worth of meals. Pretty awesome. Occasionally I'll chop up some other vegetables and throw those in, and I usually use some kind of oil-and-vinegar salad dressing to flavor it.
I've finally found my cheap, easily prepared, high-protein staple for when I don't feel like cooking/deciding what to eat.

HappyOldGuy
30th January 09, 12:47 AM
The happyoldlady is a lentil fiend. This week she made a nice soup of red lentils, mirepoix, and apples finished off with a touch of milk and butter and then put the stick blender in the whole thing. Pretty tasty.

mrblackmagic
30th January 09, 08:21 AM
Not exactly healthy

1 pound lentil beans
2 smoked sausage chopped
8 to 10 cups water
Tony Zachery's seasoning
garlic salt
Tabasco sauce
salt and pepper to taste
cup celery, chopped
1 cup onion, chopped
1 cup cloves garlic, pressed
2 cups rice, cooked

soak the beans overnight.

Place the beans in water with the seasoning. It's kind of trial and error to get it were you want. Just start with a teaspoon of all the seasoning. Cook, uncovered, over low heat.

In a skillet, sauté the chopped sausage. Transfer sausage to the bean pot. Add the celery, onion, and garlic to the grease in the skillet; sauté until soft. Pour this mixture into the bean pot.

Cook for until the beans are soft and creamy (about about 3 hours) . Keep an eye on it while it cooks, and add more water if necessary.

KO'd N DOA
30th January 09, 12:22 PM
Mrblackmagic's looks good...

...for Mrs KO'd Spanish style, Chorizo replace the smoked, and bay leaves, and hot peppers, and replace the rice with tiny cubed potatos (stay firmer than rice)...a day or two in fridge will blend the flavors.

Olay...

Aphid Jones
30th January 09, 03:36 PM
So, since my initial post, lentils have rapidly become the primary staple in my diet.
I've generally found the easiest way for me to eat them is to boil up a bag of them, throw them in a tupperware container, and chomp away for the next couple days.
Twenty minutes of cooking (most of which can be spent making chainmail/playing DS), which provides me with half a weeks worth of meals. Pretty awesome. Occasionally I'll chop up some other vegetables and throw those in, and I usually use some kind of oil-and-vinegar salad dressing to flavor it.
I've finally found my cheap, easily prepared, high-protein staple for when I don't feel like cooking/deciding what to eat.
Am I to understand you've been eating large helpings of PLAIN lentils?

What kind? That seems sorta, unpleasant.