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WarPhalange
13th September 08, 01:49 AM
I buy Morton brand salt. It has the exact combination of sodium and chloride that I enjoy in my food.

When I go to a restaurant I ask if they have Morton brand salt. If they don't, I order a bunch of sushi and realize I don't like it as much as I thought I did. Plus that seaweed layer is way chewier than I'm used to. WTF giving shitty sushi to the gaijin? That's bullshit.

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
13th September 08, 01:55 AM
Whoever wins, we lose.

WarPhalange
13th September 08, 01:56 AM
Since you're Asian I guess you only eat solidified soy sauce, huh? That's stuff's pretty salty. I bet they use Morton Brand Salt to get it that way.

Neildo
13th September 08, 01:59 AM
Sea salt.

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
13th September 08, 02:04 AM
i'm not asian you pillow biting pollack

Robot Jesus
13th September 08, 02:07 AM
Kosher salt

its just pure NaCl, no iodine, no silicon. just salt. except for morton brand kosher salt. it contains sodium ferrocyanide as a free flow agent so fuck them.


its also a lot cheaper that sea salt and tastes the same.

Steve
13th September 08, 02:12 AM
Hmm, where is that food forum again?

Robot Jesus
13th September 08, 02:23 AM
between Japanese and Korean martial arts on the bullshido style forums?

or is it /q/

Kiko
13th September 08, 06:05 AM
Wait. Salt = Salt, right? I use whatever is cheapest, and Kosher, since I can use that in the fishtank, too. We try NOT to use alot of salt....
http://doclibrary.com/MFR457/IMG/bottle_title.jpg
FTW!

and HERBS!!

Stick
13th September 08, 04:09 PM
Morton Coarse Kosher Salt.

WarPhalange
13th September 08, 04:16 PM
WTF is "kosher" salt?

jvjim
13th September 08, 04:28 PM
Don't you have to go fuck around with gravity or something?

Kiko
13th September 08, 04:35 PM
WTF is "kosher" salt?
Well you see, you take salt, get a Rabbi to come bless it and light the sabbath candles....



































What a stupid question!!!

Cullion
13th September 08, 04:35 PM
WTF is "kosher" salt?

Jew Salt.

More expensive.

purer.

With a bitter aftertaste.

WarPhalange
13th September 08, 04:38 PM
Why is it pure-er?

Or, I guess, how?

Cullion
13th September 08, 04:43 PM
Goy salt has potassium chloride and anti-caking agents and shit mixed in with it.
You can't be sure that this stuff hasn't been slipped in by a catholic priest, or the chemicals didn't originally come from the reduced residue of some unkosher animal's bones.

Kiko
13th September 08, 04:43 PM
Kosher salt or Koshering salt (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kosher_salt) is a term that describes one of the most commonly used varieties of edible salt in commercial kitchens today. Kosher salt has a much larger grain size than regular table salt, and a more open granular structure. Like common table salt, kosher salt consists of the chemical compound sodium chloride. Unlike common table salt, Kosher salt typically contains no additives (for example, iodine), although kosher salt produced by Morton contains sodium ferrocyanide as a free-flow agent. The term kosher salt is restricted to North America; in the UK it is called koshering salt,[1] and in other parts of the world, "(coarse) cooking salt". In North America, the British term koshering salt has been proposed as more accurate and is sometimes used in industry (e.g., The Salt Institute), but it is rarely used in everyday language.

Kosher salt gets its name not because it follows the guidelines for kosher foods as written in the Torah (nearly all salt is kosher, including ordinary table salt), but rather because of its use in making meats kosher, by helping to extract the blood from the meat. Because kosher salt grains are larger than regular table salt grains, when meats are coated in kosher salt the salt does not dissolve readily; the salt remains on the surface of the meat longer to draw fluids out of the meat.

Kosher salt can be used in nearly all applications, but it is not generally recommended for baking with recipes that use small amounts of liquid (wet ingredients). If there is not enough liquid, the kosher salt will not dissolve sufficiently, and this can result in small bits of salt in the resulting product; in certain applications this is undesirable. In recipes where there is enough liquid to dissolve all the salt, table salt can be replaced by kosher salt, but the volume must be adjusted. Because kosher grains occupy more volume (for equal weight) the volume of kosher salt should be increased. Because kosher salt grains can vary in size considerably from one brand to another, it is recommended that one check the box for a conversion guideline, which is generally provided. If there is no guidance provided, twice as much kosher salt (by volume) to replace table salt serves as a rough estimate. Another reliable technique is to use an equal weight; a gram of kosher salt is equivalent to a gram of table salt.

Because of the absence of iodine, kosher salt tends to make flavors cleaner and brighter than iodized salt, which has a slightly metallic flavor.


THERE!

WarPhalange
13th September 08, 04:47 PM
Morton salt FTW!

Kiko
13th September 08, 05:00 PM
Why? You got a thing for her?
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1039/1365425839_21b282604f_b.jpg

Or you like the extra chemicals?

Originally, the company had added magnesium carbonate as an absorbing agent to ensure that its table salt poured freely; calcium silicate is now used instead for the same purpose.

WarPhalange
13th September 08, 05:24 PM
That girl is 76 today.

Kiko
13th September 08, 05:26 PM
Oke. Pepper. Ground or corns?

Frank White
13th September 08, 06:21 PM
In ancient Rome, soldiers were paid part of their wages with salt. It was very valuable back then, like diamonds!

(see, I know stuff too!)

Robot Jesus
13th September 08, 06:49 PM
ground pepper lacks many of the essential oils corns contains, they are unstable and quickly break down.

and in Rome they didn't grind pepper, the grated it.

Kiko
14th September 08, 07:25 AM
Like nutmeg?
(http://abcnews.go.com/Health/story?id=5535046)

Fresh ground black pepper always. The white seems pretty potent ground though. Better in white sauces.

Robot Jesus
14th September 08, 01:41 PM
yes, they used what is called long pepper
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_pepper

Zendetta
14th September 08, 02:15 PM
expensive celtic sea salt (what, do they get it drunk first?), chunky salt blessed by some Hebe, and hawaiian salt with a bunch of crud in it.

Good salt makes a world of difference if you put it on real food.

Zendetta
14th September 08, 02:17 PM
Kosher, since I can use that in the fishtank, too.

Wha?!??! You got Jewish Fish?

oh, Gefilte Fish.

Kiko
14th September 08, 03:52 PM
No, but I figure Kosher is closer to sea/aquarium salt and both are non-iodized. I'm not gonna cook with the stuff sold in pet stores.

Cullion
14th September 08, 05:06 PM
expensive celtic sea salt (what, do they get it drunk first?)

That sounds very, very much like a marketing scam aimed at Americans with remote scottish or irish ancestry that they've gotten romantic ideas about from Irish theme pubs and movies.

Sun Wukong
14th September 08, 07:00 PM
I use morton salt for cooking, but for table salt, I use this:

http://www.anomaly.org/debbie/recipes/images/seasoning.jpg.


Do you non-american types have this stuff at the market? If not, my condolences on your bland and miserable food.

EuropIan
14th September 08, 07:04 PM
Americans need superior condiments to help down their bland and miserable food.

EuropIan
14th September 08, 07:05 PM
that reminds me, I found one of those and used it for almost everything cooking related.

Sun Wukong
14th September 08, 07:07 PM
Americans need superior condiments to help down their bland and miserable food.

zing!

Sun Wukong
14th September 08, 07:18 PM
That sounds very, very much like a marketing scam aimed at Americans with remote scottish or irish ancestry that they've gotten romantic ideas about from Irish theme pubs and movies.

let us not forget the ever exported irish themed music about being poor and shit upon by the british.

WarPhalange
14th September 08, 08:27 PM
Americans need superior condiments to help down their bland and miserable food.

That's because other cultures (such as Indian) use spices and seasonings as a base and add things like meat and vegetables for flavor.

Halfrican
14th September 08, 09:18 PM
There should be a who fucking cares option

WarPhalange
14th September 08, 10:56 PM
Mods, please add a "Halfrican is an Idiot" option. Thank you.

Kiko
15th September 08, 05:53 AM
I use morton salt for cooking, but for table salt, I use this:

http://www.anomaly.org/debbie/recipes/images/seasoning.jpg.


Do you non-american types have this stuff at the market? If not, my condolences on your bland and miserable food.

Creole cuisine came from part of America - with a few other influences - so why wouldn't we have it? Looks like the same sorta thing Justin Wilson used to use/make and Emeril puts into his Essence.
Here's the site... http://www.cajunspice.com/

Zendetta
15th September 08, 01:55 PM
Tony Chachere's is Grade-A Awesome. I'm currently out and my upscale yuppy health food market doesn't have White Trash Aisle. Damn Yuppies.

Seriously, that stuff on chicken breast or pork loin = WIN.

Aphid Jones
15th September 08, 02:38 PM
hawaiian salt with a bunch of crud in it.

I get that salt. That is some good salt. Good for soup.