PDA

View Full Version : Bachelor Chef…Lets Cook Steaks!



Olorin
9th April 08, 08:26 PM
Recently I have been working on different ways to cook streaks and have found a method I really like. And you don’t even need a grill.

Stuff you will need:

Steaks (I like NY strip steaks)
Fry pan (the heavier the better, cast iron is best)
Unsalted Butter
Vegetable oil
Beef Stock/bouillon and Brandy (bourbon or whiskey works too)
Assorted Peppercorns

The method we will be using to cook the steaks is called Bifteck Saute Au Beurre. (pan-broiled steak) The final product is called Steak au Poivre (pepper steak with brandy sauce)

Yes this is French cooking but don’t let that intimidate you…its really easy.

This recipe is for two streaks.

Take 1 Tb of the peppercorns, place them on a cutting board, and crush them with the bottom of a pan or a rolling pin. Just crush em up. Spread the crushed pepper out and press the steaks (both sides) in the pepper. Get that pepper on those steaks. Now let them rest with the pepper on for about 30 minutes.

In the meantime prepare the rest of your ingredients.

Measure out:

1 ½ Tb butter and 1 ½ Tb oil
¼ cup beef stock
3 Tb brandy, bourbon, or whiskey
2 Tb softened butter

Ok, lets get to it.

Put the butter and oil in the pan over medium high heat. The mixture will foam up; when the foam subsides it is hot enough. Put in the streaks and cook on each side for 3 to 4 minutes. (1 inch thick streaks)

Remove the streaks to rest (5 minutes) and prepare the sauce. Salt the steaks to taste.

Pore the fat out the pan and return the pan to the burner. Pour in the beef stock and boil rapidly over high heat while deglazing the pan (scraping the bottom of the pan with a spoon) Do this for a minute or so and then add the brandy. Boil for a minute or two. This will evaporate the alcohol. Pour the mixture into a cup and swirl in the butter, a small spoon full at a time.

When the sauce is done pore a few spoonfuls over the steaks and serve.

That’s it!

Enjoy…

For a more detailed description see Julia Child’s Mastering the Art of French Cooking and Jacques Pepin’s Complete Techniques.
.

Steve
9th April 08, 09:46 PM
Dude! Where's the pictures?? Those were the best part...

Pretty eff-ing sweet, anyways.

Olorin
9th April 08, 10:55 PM
Dude! Where's the pictures?? Those were the best part...

Pretty eff-ing sweet, anyways.

No pics this time...it all just happened so fast.

Neildo
10th April 08, 02:24 AM
I've been marinating my steaks for a day or two and then cooking them in the broiler. They come out so tender i can cut them with a fork.

jubei33
10th April 08, 04:05 AM
nice recipe, i do something similar as well. tasty

Olorin
10th April 08, 09:13 AM
I've been marinating my steaks for a day or two and then cooking them in the broiler. They come out so tender i can cut them with a fork.

That sounds good. What do you marinate in?

Cullion
10th April 08, 05:33 PM
I think tomato, red-wine, shallots and worcester sauce make a good alternative when you're in the mood for something different to a pepper and/or hard liquor based sauce. Especially on a very rare steak. Mingles with the blood and compliments it rather than drowns it out.

Zendetta
10th April 08, 05:51 PM
Rib Eye + charcoal + salt and pepper. 2003 Pinot noir.

Also (and this is GREAT with steak): take a few whole heads of garlic, slice off the tops, and either grill or bake in oven, then squeeze the gooey cloves onto the steak (rare naturally).

Also, my recipe for "Ong Bak Beef":
Take some skirt steak (heheh)
Put it in a big ziploc bag and marinate in Soy Vey (or any teriyaki will do)
Beat yer meat (muay thai style) with fists, forearms and elbows. Don't rip bag!
Then grill it and slice across the grain. Serve with coconut rice* and grilled veggies.

* EZ version: make 2 cups white rice, pour in half can of coconut milk, add sea salt to taste.

Cullion
10th April 08, 05:54 PM
I like the choice of Rib-eye. I think people overestimate fillet. The flavour isn't as strong and you can get a steak just as tender if you're prepared to put the work in.

Cullion
10th April 08, 05:55 PM
Also, rare steak and a strong onion-based salad works just dandy if you're following some kind of paleo/low carb diet and it's easy to get at most restaurants.

Zendetta
10th April 08, 06:08 PM
You still Cavemanning it?

Ever check out the laab? (Thai meat salad?)

Also, I had Ethiopian Kit Fo recently: its raw beef marinated in clarified butter and spices. Fucking AMAZING. Highly recommended.

Ethiopian friends tell me its the quintessential Ethiopian dish (warriors used to eat it before battle) and I can see why.

Steve
10th April 08, 06:39 PM
Dude, Cullion is all about laab. I think he mentions it at least once every 24 hours.

Cullion
10th April 08, 06:55 PM
You still Cavemanning it?

Except for alcohol and high-cocoa dark chocolate, yeah.


Ever check out the laab? (Thai meat salad?)

Oh hells yeah.



Also, I had Ethiopian Kit Fo recently: its raw beef marinated in clarified butter and spices. Fucking AMAZING. Highly recommended.

Ethiopian friends tell me its the quintessential Ethiopian dish (warriors used to eat it before battle) and I can see why.

I had a meal at an ethopian/eritrean restaurant about 18 months ago, it was all about egg, meat stew and a massive egg-pancake you folded around the meat stew and chopped boiled eggs and shoved in your mouth. The 'momma-san' who ran the restaurant kept coming to my table with a big smile on her face and breaking off a chunk to feed to me by hand. I think she had a thing about watching 'heavy-set' guys eat.

Cullion
10th April 08, 06:57 PM
Todays food was a plum-tomato salad, bananas, oranges and apples, raw nuts, zero-additive cold cuts of roast beef, canned herring and red wine. No calorie counting, just as much of each as I wanted until I was sated.

Zendetta
10th April 08, 06:58 PM
Kinky. Ethiopian food must of course be washed down with Tej (honey wine). Go back and get the Kit Fo!!! I steered you right on the laab, yes?

A caveman like you will LOVE Kit Fo.

Cullion
10th April 08, 06:59 PM
The laab is pure and true. I can't get back to that restaurant easily as it's in London and I only do nights out in London a couple of times per year.

Neildo
11th April 08, 12:33 AM
That sounds good. What do you marinate in?

filipino soy sauce (i don't know if there's a difference), malt vinegar, worchestershire sauce, and some sliced garlic. it's a variation on filipino adobo.

Neildo
14th April 08, 11:41 PM
That sounds good. What do you marinate in?

Picture tiem!!!

oven pre-heated, ready to go in
http://neildato.googlepages.com/DSC00239.JPG
time to flip em
http://neildato.googlepages.com/DSC00240.JPG
done! total cooking time = 18 mins
http://neildato.googlepages.com/DSC00241.JPG
cleaning the pan (i <3 shallots)
http://neildato.googlepages.com/DSC00242.JPG
complete!
http://neildato.googlepages.com/DSC00244.JPG

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
15th April 08, 12:32 AM
i just read this thread title as "let's cook some stress". i was only a little disappointed.

Tanhalen21
15th April 08, 12:35 PM
Speaking of African food, I personally love Banku, which is a Ghanaian dish of a kind of corn dough served with a kind of soup / stew that usually has beef and / or fish. You take a pinch of the corn dough with your hand, dip it in the soup, and consume.

No clue how easy it is to make, but one of you should figure out how and then cook it for me.

Olorin
15th April 08, 12:50 PM
Speaking of African food, I personally love Banku, which is a Ghanaian dish of a kind of corn dough served with a kind of soup / stew that usually has beef and / or fish. You take a pinch of the corn dough with your hand, dip it in the soup, and consume.

No clue how easy it is to make, but one of you should figure out how and then cook it for me.

Does this sound right?

Link (http://www.congocookbook.com/staple_dish_recipes/banku_and_kenkey.html)

I guess you then par this with one of the soups available on the website.
.

Tanhalen21
15th April 08, 01:31 PM
Yeah, that does sound right. Fufu is basically the same thing but one tribe generally cooks banku and the other cooks fufu. Banku is made of corn while fufu is made of cassava, but they are eaten with pretty much the same kinds of stews. I like banku a little bit better.