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Olorin
21st August 07, 01:27 AM
Every year my department gives the students a chance to evaluate my performance. Now the vast majority of these reviews are positive, because I rule, but a few malcontents take me to task.

Lets all enjoy…

“He talks for an hour and expects us to write down everything he says as he says it.“

“Way too difficult. Its not like this is our only class!”

“The lectures are not useful. He draws pointless pictures on the board…”

“Either grade easier or teach better!”

“Hard as hell!”

“Teach more interesting things”

“I used to love history in High School, but he has totally destroyed that interest.”

“The attitude of the professor is that of a pious dictator…he is a dickhead.”

“The professor only talks to hear the sound of his own voice”

“Needs to pull the stick out of his ass”

Now I am not allowed to respond but if I could…

http://www.bullshido.net/gallery/data/500/medium/Whambulance.jpg

This about sums it up…

ThaiBoxerShorts
21st August 07, 01:29 AM
I wanna see some of the pointless pictures you draw on the board.

Olorin
21st August 07, 01:31 AM
I wanna see some of the pointless pictures you draw on the board.

Whenever I talk about the early voyages to the New World I draw Trogdor lurking in the ocean.

http://rog.gameslate.com/gfx/other/trogdor.png

My favorite review was "Pious Dictator" that just rules...

.

DAYoung
21st August 07, 01:35 AM
Brilliant.

If I'm ever in your neck of the woods, I'm sitting in on your classes.

INCOGNITO.

ThaiBoxerShorts
21st August 07, 01:47 AM
Brilliant.

If I'm ever in your neck of the woods, I'm sitting in on your classes.

INCOGNITO.
The stony face and beard will totally give you away.

Mas
21st August 07, 04:56 AM
If you don't mind me asking, what history do you teach?

ironlurker
21st August 07, 08:35 AM
My personal favorite review of a class I taught was that of a student who wrote "He shouldn't call on people who don't know the answer to the question"

Zendetta
21st August 07, 02:03 PM
Your students are WEAK.

Olorin
21st August 07, 02:53 PM
If you don't mind me asking, what history do you teach?

The basic American history survey.


Your students are WEAK.

Any more bitchin' and they are getting the NEEEBAH!

.

WarPhalange
21st August 07, 03:33 PM
"Shouldn't teach if he doesn't know how to post a simple poll."

Stick
21st August 07, 06:36 PM
Man, Poop Loops you hate Olorin.

Iscariot
21st August 07, 06:47 PM
The basic American history survey.
There's a years worth of classes in that?

Stick
21st August 07, 07:20 PM
/rimshot followed by god save the queen

Jolly good show, old chum.

Now take your tea and fuck off before you, as one of the officers, are picked off by colonial marksmen, ya fuck'n lobster-back!

Iscariot
21st August 07, 07:58 PM
The only thing your side 'pick off' are their own side.

If I'm the enemy, I'm actually safer.

Stick
21st August 07, 08:59 PM
If that were the case, you would've won...... what do our powers of observation tell us about this, I wonder...

One if by land, two if by sea, and three if Iscariot's a stuck-up limey twit

3

WarPhalange
21st August 07, 09:04 PM
Man, Poop Loops you hate Olorin.
Actually, I don't, but I have noticed I pick on him more than anyone. Should I apologize to him?

Maybe I'll make a poll to find out...

Stick
21st August 07, 09:05 PM
/golf clap

Olorin
21st August 07, 11:34 PM
There's a years worth of classes in that?

Its only a semester class. (rim shot)

Actually, I had the first class of the new semester today. As always, I was nervous before the first class, but it went really well. When I first started teaching, they gave me two classes of 40 students, then one class of 140, and this semester I have one massive class of 200 students. Its good experience for when I hit the job market in about a year. Many new Doctors have never run their own class and can’t teach worth a shit.

.

WarPhalange
21st August 07, 11:49 PM
Many new Doctors have never run their own class and can’t teach worth a shit.

Truth. Aren't you required to have some sort of experience before teaching professionaly, though?

WarPhalange
21st August 07, 11:51 PM
If that were the case, you would've won...... what do our powers of observation tell us about this, I wonder...

England would have obliterated the rebels if they didn't think India was more valuable.

So you can call them idiots, but they were powerful idiots.


Were.

Olorin
21st August 07, 11:58 PM
Truth. Aren't you required to have some sort of experience before teaching professionally, though?

Not always. I have seen PhD's from Yale with no real experience teaching a class. Some schools allow a grad student to focus only on research and as a result they have a very narrow view of history. Ya they know a ton about their topic but are complete morons about everything else.

It is really painful to watch them lecture. And some universities history programs actively discourage grad students from showing an interest in the teaching end of the profession. Like it is beneath them to teach to the plebes.

edit: to celebrate the new semester, and because I am off tomorrow, I have decided to get hammered on cheep beer tonight.

.

WarPhalange
22nd August 07, 12:16 AM
Not always. I have seen PhD's from Yale with no real experience teaching a class. Some schools allow a grad student to focus only on research and as a result they have a very narrow view of history. Ya they know a ton about their topic but are complete morons about everything else.

It is really painful to watch them lecture. And some universities history programs actively discourage grad students from showing an interest in the teaching end of the profession. Like it is beneath them to teach to the plebes.


Fun fact: During my community college days I was taking the standard physics series. Every quarter there was a 30 minute or so presentation by everybody in groups. Except for this one guy. Only other physics major in the class (only 40 of us total, though).

Anyway, I'm kicking it in the back with the professor, and it's the guy's turn. He "lost" his flash drive with his powerpoint presentation. It's okay, he'll draw as he's going along. A nuclear reactor. Almost an hour later, this guy is still going. Prof turns to me and says "God damn, he's like a grad student..."

Me: "Were you like that?"

Him: "Of course not."

He had to tell the guy twice to finish up because the guy kept GOING and mumbling. It was like a train wreck. I even wrote that on the guy's evaluation.

DAYoung
22nd August 07, 01:14 AM
I have to admit, I've done much more research than teaching.

But I still put a lot into it when I do, and I've had pretty diverse experience (from TAFE (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TAFE) to Honours (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bachelor's_degree#Australia) lectures, to Baccalaureate students). I suspect this helps.

I also started early - I was tutoring in third year (which is common for some scientists, but not in the humanities).

WarPhalange
22nd August 07, 01:44 AM
Third year graduate or third year undergraduate?

Graduate I don't know, but undergrad you are right. You tend to take more math and science (duh) than most people care for, so you naturally are able to help people who need to take the class for nursing, or engineering, or stuff like that.

I can't imagine a lot of people who don't really enjoy philosophy take those classes. And if you enjoy it, you tend to do better in it or at least enjoy the struggle of learning.

DAYoung
22nd August 07, 01:49 AM
Third year graduate or third year undergraduate?

Undergraduate. As a third-year postgraduate, you're supposed to be almost finished, and close to lecturing/fellowship standard (both of which are rare, but...).


Graduate I don't know, but undergrad you are right. You tend to take more math and science (duh) than most people care for, so you naturally are able to help people who need to take the class for nursing, or engineering, or stuff like that.

I can't imagine a lot of people who don't really enjoy philosophy take those classes. And if you enjoy it, you tend to do better in it or at least enjoy the struggle of learning.

Absolutely. The best 'secret' to doing well is loving it, or at least relishing the struggle.

WarPhalange
22nd August 07, 12:10 PM
Undergraduate. As a third-year postgraduate, you're supposed to be almost finished,

Finished with what? Your Ph.D.? And is this straight from a 4 year degree?

DAYoung
22nd August 07, 04:13 PM
Finished with what? Your Ph.D.? And is this straight from a 4 year degree?

PhD's supposed to be done in three years, after a four-year BA (Hons.) and possible a MA.

Cullion
22nd August 07, 04:59 PM
England would have obliterated the rebels if they didn't think India was more valuable.

So you can call them idiots, but they were powerful idiots.


Were.

But.. we won.

We gave you that political system as a punishment.

WarPhalange
22nd August 07, 05:42 PM
PhD's supposed to be done in three years, after a four-year BA (Hons.) and possible a MA.

What the FUCK?!

Is that just for philosophy or is that how it works over there? Is there like something higher than a Ph.D.?

Because here for a science Ph.D. it takes about 7 years after your 4-year bachelor's degree

DAYoung
22nd August 07, 06:56 PM
What the FUCK?!

Is that just for philosophy or is that how it works over there? Is there like something higher than a Ph.D.?

Because here for a science Ph.D. it takes about 7 years after your 4-year bachelor's degree

That's across the board. A physicist in my office did his in about 3-3/12 years. Then he was off to Imperial College for a postdoctoral fellowship.

Of course, many PhDs take longer. But they're not supposed to. The Government will only fund them for 3-31/2 years. After that, they often cut the students off.

As I understand it, PhDs in the US have a coursework component at the beginning. We don't have that.

Cullion
22nd August 07, 08:20 PM
Americans specialise later in their education. English-patterned education systems often have you narrowing it down to 3-4 closely related subjects from the ages of 16-18, like Maths, Physics and Chemistry. British-style undergraduate degrees tend to be more narrowly focussed on one or two closely related subjects right from the start, rather than requiring you to take a broad range of classes and then hone it down to a 'Major' with some extra stuff on the side like you do in the US.

This means that by the end of the undergraduate degree, somebody educated the british way will have a deeper knowledge of their specialism, but having covered a much less broad range of subjects.

This means that in the US people embarking on a Ph.D in Physics will have taken lots of courses in social science/humanities that a brit wouldn't likely have studied (they just went to college to study Physics as an undergrad), but will spend the early part of their Ph.D doing classes in Physics and related subjects which the brit has already taken the equivalent of.

In addition, traditionally, british patterned education isn't designed around the student working to earn a living whilst they study, it's designed around just getting it done as fast as possible, whereas in the US I think the courses are more designed with the student as an adult who has to earn a living to pay for it all in mind.

Sun Wukong
22nd August 07, 08:32 PM
You do get positive reviews from time to time right?

WarPhalange
22nd August 07, 08:48 PM
Here are the requirements for a BS in physics from the university I go to:

http://www.phys.washington.edu/bsrequirements.htm

Both "Physics Requirements" and "Minimum Requiremnt In UW Courses" are what we need.


Average credits per quarter is around 15, 3 quarters in a year.

Olorin
23rd August 07, 12:39 AM
You do get positive reviews from time to time right?

They were almost all positive, but that is no fun. I only posted the negative reviews.


PhD's supposed to be done in three years, after a four-year BA (Hons.) and possible a MA.

Not here. Four years undergrad, two years MA, and five years PhD, thats minimum.

.

DAYoung
23rd August 07, 01:03 AM
Not here. Four years undergrad, two years MA, and five years PhD, thats minimum..

We iz smarta

WarPhalange
23rd August 07, 01:04 AM
Not here. Four years undergrad, two years MA, and five years PhD, thats minimum.

.

Really? I was under the impression that the sciences took longer to get a Ph.D. versus other fields because of all the snags you hit along the way, things like "how do I get this machine to work?" and stuff like that. If not for the snags, it wouldn't take as long.

Can you explain what you had to do to get your Ph.D.? Or at least, what was the most time-consuming part?

WarPhalange
23rd August 07, 01:05 AM
Crap. I can't believe I graduated from there 6 years ago. Useless MIS bachelors. Good school though, I just chose the wrong program.

What's MIS?

Sun Wukong
23rd August 07, 01:27 AM
What's MIS?
Management Information Systems. Computer Science Lite(tm) for people wanting to get into IT work.

From my (3rd person) experience, honestly, it's only worth is that it is a 4 year degree, but for what it is you'd be better off majoring in anything else and just getting a few IT certifications if you really want to do IT work.

I'm sorry to any potential MIS under-grad's but I've met more unemployed, under-employed, and guys working out of IT with that degree, by a healthy margin, than any other degree ever.

My advice is to avoid it like the proverbial plague. IT is usually a dead end job pit anyway with very shaky job security when the tech slumps hit.

Olorin
23rd August 07, 01:44 AM
We iz smarta

I has more edumication than you.


Really? I was under the impression that the sciences took longer to get a Ph.D. versus other fields because of all the snags you hit along the way, things like "how do I get this machine to work?" and stuff like that. If not for the snags, it wouldn't take as long.

Can you explain what you had to do to get your Ph.D.? Or at least, what was the most time-consuming part?

It’s all time consuming. It can be done in eleven years but it usual takes about fifteen years from undergrad to PhD.

Here is the whole process.

You asked for it…

For a BA in History:

General Education Requirements 40 Hours

College/Departmental Requirements 23 Hours

Major Requirements 51 Hours

Electives 9 hours

Masters:

Students must complete a minimum of thirty hours of graduate courses in three fields (at least one in United States history and one in non-United States history). These hours must include at least nine hours of seminar including at least one research seminar, Historical Methods (History 5023), and six hours of thesis (History 5000). With the consent of their advisory committee, students may substitute a field in a related discipline for one field in history. Students must take at least six hours in the related discipline. The specific courses used to comprise this field must be taken at the graduate level and have the approval of that member of the advisory committee representing the related discipline.

Students must demonstrate competency in one foreign language by passing a translation examination in that language. Advisory committees may require additional proficiency in other languages, quantitative methods, or other research skills. Students are urged to complete their language requirement(s) by the end of their fourth semester of enrollment.

Students must maintain a B (3.0) average as defined in the university regulations in the Graduate Catalog.

Students must demonstrate a capacity for independent research by preparing an original thesis on a topic within their major area of study.

The major advisor and the advisory committee have the responsibility for approving the topic, for supervising the research and writing of the thesis, and for approving its final draft.

Students must, upon completion of the thesis, pass a final oral examination of approximately two hours in length over their master's course work and in defense of their thesis. Chaired by the major advisor, the orals committee will be composed of full or associate members of the graduate faculty who comprise the advisory committee. Following the examination, the three members of the committee will vote to pass or fail the candidate. If two members of the orals committee determine that the student's performance has been unsatisfactory, the student will be judged to have failed. The student may take the examination again but not less than one month later. The examination may not be taken more than twice.

PhD:

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND PREPARATION FOR COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS

In general, a minimum of sixty semester graduate credit hours beyond the M.A. degree is required, with a "B" average for all courses.

Students are not admitted to candidacy until they have:

Demonstrated competency in one foreign language by passing a translation examination in that language. Advisory committees may require additional proficiency in other languages, quantitative methods, or other research skills. Students are urged to complete their language requirement(s) by the end of their fourth semester of enrollment.

Received the advisory committee's approval of a dissertation proposal, in the form designated by the department, and filed it with the departmental Director of Graduate Studies before passing qualifying examinations and by a date to be established by the Graduate Director.

Passed the written and oral qualifying examinations.

QUALIFYING EXAMINATIONS

Students must take written and oral qualifying examinations in four fields. A Ph.D. student's dissertation proposal must be approved before the taking of qualifying examinations.

The Director of Graduate Studies selects an examiner and two readers for each field. The examiner is responsible for soliciting questions from the readers for the composition of an examination, which will be five hours in length, and for reporting the results of the examination to the Director of Graduate Studies. The examiner and readers for each field are responsible for grading the examination. No person will serve as examiner in more than one field.

The Graduate Committee will prescribe procedural rules for administering the examinations. The Director of Graduate Studies will determine the date, time, and place for each examination, but no student will take two examinations on the same day.

If performance on the written qualifying examination is satisfactory in at least three fields, students will take an oral examination over all four fields.
The examination will be open to all members of the departmental faculty.
The orals committee will be composed of the members of the student's advisory committee. The major advisor will serve as chair of the committee. Members of the orals committee will also have been either examiners or readers of the written examination.

Following an examination of approximately two hours in length, the four members of the committee will vote to pass or fail the student. Their decision will be based not only upon the performance of the student during the oral examination but also upon the written examinations. Students must pass all four fields in order to satisfy this portion of the Ph.D. requirements.

If a member of the orals committee determines that the written and oral performance of the student has been unsatisfactory in a single field, the student may retake the field examination the next time it is offered (at least four months later). If students are found deficient in two examination fields, they must retake examination in all fields. Students may not take the qualifying examinations more than twice.

Examination procedures may be modified at the discretion of the Graduate Committee.

Students must pass the qualifying examinations and be admitted to candidacy at least six months before the commencement in which they expect to receive the Ph.D. degree.

DISSERTATION

Candidates must demonstrate a capacity for independent research by the production of an original dissertation on a topic within their major field of study. The major advisor and the candidate's advisory committee have the responsibility for supervising the research and writing of the dissertation and for approving its final draft. Normally, dissertations will be in excess of two hundred pages, including notes and bibliography.

The Graduate College requires completion of the final examination (oral defense) about six weeks before the end of the semester. Candidates must complete the dissertation sufficiently in advance of that deadline to permit careful review of the manuscript by all members of the advisory committee. This must include at least one week for the major advisor (dissertation director) to read and edit the manuscript, and subsequently at least one week for each of the other committee members to have exclusive access to an edited copy of the manuscript. If one copy is to be shared by two or more members of the committee, candidates must allow additional time, so that one week's access can be afforded to each member of the committee.

.

WarPhalange
23rd August 07, 01:55 AM
It's usually 11 years from undergrad through Ph.D. for a science major. I don't know why you would dick around for 4 more years.

Olorin
23rd August 07, 01:57 AM
It's usually 11 years from undergrad through Ph.D. for a science major.

Says the undergrad who has never done it.


I don't know why you would dick around for 4 more years.

Because it is actually hard to get a PhD in History.

.

WarPhalange
23rd August 07, 02:02 AM
Because it is actually hard to get a PhD in History.

Quoted so you can't change that later.

But let's take a brief moment to dissect this:

History: Study things in hopes to find out new information about the past.

Science: Study things in hopes of figuring out NEW information about the universe.

What do you study? Old books?

Hey, guess what? So do science students. And they have to learn how to use a bunch of machines that they never had any training on and probably learn a shit load of stuff on the fly that they'll need to make their experiment work. Then try to make it work. THEN compile the data once it finally works, and then analyze it and write the dissertation.

But this is only the experimentalists, which is all I have have had dealings with. In either case, there are calculations to make, figuring out if what you're trying to calculate is even possible to calculate. Doing stuff like that. You know, work.

ThaiBoxerShorts
23rd August 07, 02:03 AM
Isn't it hard to get a PhD in anything?

Except maybe Christian Education from Liberty University. They'll hand those out to any idiot.

http://bsalert.com/f-store/hovindcopy.jpg

WarPhalange
23rd August 07, 02:03 AM
Says the undergrad who has never done it.
.

Yeah, it's called "statistics". I looked them up. Through "the intarnet".

Also it's called asking my professors and the post docs I work with.

Dumb ass.

DAYoung
23rd August 07, 02:08 AM
Comparing the difficulty of PhDs in different disciplines is futile, particularly for those who haven't a PhD, let alone a PhD in two disciplines.

For what it's worth, my father has postgraduate qualifications in mathematics and the humanities (as well as psychology). He thought the humanities PhD was much more difficult.

A physicist friend of mine (doing his PhD in molecular simulation) says what I do is harder.

But really, it's a ridiculous argument. Perceptions of difficulty have more to do with aptitude than the intrinsic difficulty of the doctorate, particular across disciplines.

Olorin
23rd August 07, 02:22 AM
Hey, guess what? So do science students.

LOL, scientists know shit about the history of their own profession.


And they have to learn how to use a bunch of machines that they never had any training on and probably learn a shit load of stuff on the fly that they'll need to make their experiment work.

Cry me a river emo.


THEN compile the data once it finally works, and then analyze it and write the dissertation.

Oh my GODS, they have to actually compile data, And then write a conclusion? Holy shit, run, freak out!


there are calculations to make

Ya you put fucking numbers in little boxes, LOL. A trained monkey could do what you do.

How about you let me know when you get accepted to a graduate school you community college bitch.


Also it's called asking my professors and the post docs I work with.

Dumb ass.

Ya community college…community college…

I'm fucking laughing my ass off!!! I can not belive I ever took you seriously...

.

Steve
23rd August 07, 02:34 AM
You're all too smart for your own good.

Shame on you.

*goes back to watching people spend their time arguing about how smart they are instead of helping humanity*

WarPhalange
23rd August 07, 03:21 AM
LOL, scientists know shit about the history of their own profession.

Actually, most of them do. Those theories we learn? We tend to learn the background to them and why they were developed and how.



Ya you put fucking numbers in little boxes, LOL. A trained monkey could do what you do.

Numbers? Haven't seen those in a while.


How about you let me know when you get accepted to a graduate school you community college bitch.

Ya community college…community college…

Errr... did you not read the page I linked to? This will be my second year at a university. A rather good one.

Cullion
23rd August 07, 02:46 PM
I chose sciences partly because I found them easier than the humanities.

Cullion
23rd August 07, 02:58 PM
Here are the requirements for a BS in physics from the university I go to:

http://www.phys.washington.edu/bsrequirements.htm

Both "Physics Requirements" and "Minimum Requiremnt In UW Courses" are what we need.


Average credits per quarter is around 15, 3 quarters in a year.

Yes, looking at the maths course Math 126 which is a 1st year requirement for a BS in Physics, it's around the level of difficulty of somebody who chose to study 'A-level' maths at the age 16-18 in the UK (at least when I was that age, they keep dumbing down the british education system).

It's stuff that would have been covered in the first year of the 'A-level' programme (age 16). Really smart kids on accelerated programmes would have covered it a year earlier than that. This isn't a dig, as I pointed out, by this point the brit would have dropped down to a more narrowly specialised range of 3-4 subjects.

This quiz is an example of the stuff I looked at to compare with when I'd done what through school and university:-

http://www.math.washington.edu/~lee/Courses/126-95-96/Quizzes/quiz1-a.html

WarPhalange
23rd August 07, 04:52 PM
Yeah, I know you guys are smarter. People from Europe who were taking Calculus were saying how they've already done it.

I took a year of Calculus in high-school, too. Except it barely covered two quarters of college level Calculus.

Stick
23rd August 07, 09:21 PM
Could we maybe not do a pissing contest over who's degree program is toughest?

Seriously, shit's lame.

WarPhalange
23rd August 07, 11:19 PM
You're only saying that because you're one of the enumaducated.

Olorin
23rd August 07, 11:39 PM
Seriously, shit's lame.

I can get WAY more lame.

Stick
23rd August 07, 11:52 PM
You're only saying that because you're one of the enumaducated.

Oh I get it, this is an attempt to goad me into your little game!

How keeoot!

You're the only person here without a degree, PL. Oh I don't doubt you'll get one, but give it a fucking rest.

WarPhalange
23rd August 07, 11:54 PM
What's your degree in? Don't worry, I'm not trying to act all superior anymore. You already know that by now.

Stick
24th August 07, 12:00 AM
History, minors in asian studies and Japanese.

WarPhalange
24th August 07, 12:04 AM
You too? Is history popular? What can you do with it besides teach?

Stick
24th August 07, 12:15 AM
Serious business.

No, seriously, business. I research individual histories looking for things me company needs and wants and then how to find the people who have them.

ThaiBoxerShorts
24th August 07, 12:21 AM
History, minors in asian studies and Japanese.
lol weeaboo

Stick
24th August 07, 12:23 AM
Earning those certificates cured me of my weeabooness most permanently.

WarPhalange
24th August 07, 12:31 AM
Serious business.

No, seriously, business. I research individual histories looking for things me company needs and wants and then how to find the people who have them.

So you're like a detective? That actually sounds pretty fun.

Cullion
24th August 07, 06:54 AM
Poop loops, unless you switch to something like Law, Medicine or an in demand engineering discipline, or are one of the small percentage of pure scientists who become professional academics, you're only a few years from finding out how few people in the workforce actually use their college degree in their job.

Undergraduate degrees for most members of the workforce in Europe and North America are simply a way of demonstrating a relatively basic level of literacy and basic ability to find things out on their own cognisance. Thanks to credential/grade inflation they are often now required for relatively low-level administrative jobs which used to be filled by people who left school at 16 or 18.

For most careers your choice of subject will matter much less than which college you went to, your grades and extra-curricular stuff which shows relevant aptitudes, experience and interest in the role you go for on graduation.

Cullion
24th August 07, 06:57 AM
Yeah, I know you guys are smarter. People from Europe who were taking Calculus were saying how they've already done it.

I took a year of Calculus in high-school, too. Except it barely covered two quarters of college level Calculus.

Brits aren't smarter. We just narrow down the range of subjects we have to study earlier and then make faster progress in that narrower band.

Stick
24th August 07, 07:00 AM
So you're like a detective? That actually sounds pretty fun.

That's the idea, yes.

SpringHeeledJack
24th August 07, 07:34 PM
You too? Is history popular? What can you do with it besides teach?I fucking hope I can do something with it other than teach. I'll punch a kid in the fucking face.