PDA

View Full Version : Why do you hate EMO so much?



Da_AzN
3rd September 06, 11:58 AM
Never have I seen such hatred against a music. Cmon. I've seen people hate rap, metal, classical, country, R & B, boyband, love songs, or any other type of music under the sun.

But why is emo so hated compared to the others?

Is it the way they dress? is it their attitude? Is it the sound of the music? Is it the lyrics? is it their lifestyle?


What exactly makes emo so hateable? Any logical or scientific proof? I'd like to hear them.

kungfujew
3rd September 06, 12:02 PM
Because Emo is a plague. A corrupting pathogen, a virus that once was a perfectly healthy offshoot of punk, now a mass-produced pop faeces phenomenon that has embroiled our nation's (and other nations', I just had a godman French emo kid living in my house for 3 weeks) youth in a mass-movement what achieves nothing other than navel-gazing self-flagellation and pussified blubbering in order to gain social acceptance. Fuck emo. And fuck those godamn kids that sit in circles outside the theater downtown on a Friday night not doing anything other than comparing emo-haircuts and wrist-slashing tips.

Neildo
3rd September 06, 12:06 PM
WTF, are you tone deaf?


IT FUCKING SUCKS ASS. If I wanted to listen to some whiny teenager cry about how pathetic he is, I'd go to a high school and beat up some teenagers.

Actually, that sounds like a good idea.

Da_AzN
3rd September 06, 12:23 PM
Follow up questions:

Emos complain and whine alot... thats a given.
What if it is a legit reason to whine? Lets say we have a jewish or a black emo... since their race is hated so much?
Lets say we have a 3rd world emo? who has alot to whine about like poverty, dictators, corruption, etc...?
Will you sympathize with those kinds of emos?

Do you think medical help or counselling or being a shoulder to cry on will help solve their problem?

Neildo
3rd September 06, 01:04 PM
I thought we were talking about EMO bands.

I've never seen black or jewish EMOs. Only pathetic white kids from the suburbs who grew up listening to too much music that they don't really understand but want to emulate really really badly.

Now admitedly, the only world music i've ever really heard is Banghra, japanese taiko drums, and swedish black metal, so i don't know. If some impoverished kid from a war-torn country in africa actually managed to get instruments and produce good music about said topics, i'm betting they would be hailed as best foreign/indie act of the year or something, because they would likely not sound like a whiny EMO kid.

edit: I think i have heard music from impoverished kids from war-torn african countries....they emigrated to the U.K., became yardies and make grimey garage...(i think that's what it's called. i downloaded some, it's pretty cool.)

WarPhalange
3rd September 06, 01:29 PM
WHO HATES METAL?? I'LL KILL THEM!!!

Emo is whiny. You had punk in the 70's which was kind of angry and rebelious thrash metal of the 80's which was really angry and violent, you had grunge of the 90's which was starting to get whiny and a shift towards passive rebeliousness (i.e. instead of getting wacky hair and doing rebelious stuff, people started getting rebelious by not doing their homework, eating their carrots, etc), and now it's emo. Completely whiny, no substance.

Where is that article on Emo music written by that rock critic? It had to do with real feminism, and pansies.

I.e. emo boys are fucking pansies. Instead of becoming men, they decide to make girls even bigger pansies so they feel better about themselves.

Punk and Metal emphasized this kind of attitude:



Kill all those who stand against you look into their eyes
Drink their blood and laugh as they pay for all their lies
Piss upon their grave then cast a final spell
Fly into the night and one day meet in hell

Lots of people whine. But emos whine about the dumbest shit. "I'm so alone, I can never be happy." "That girl was a bitch to me. All I did was treat her like a sexual object and she broke my heart! Who am I going to bone now?" etc.

Shawarma
3rd September 06, 01:43 PM
Which is why Oi! is a great genre of music.

Odacon
3rd September 06, 03:26 PM
Ok Go are the future of music.

ThaiBoxerShorts
3rd September 06, 03:32 PM
I don't have a problem with any kind of music. I'm not a fan of emo punk, but to each their own.

I don't have a problem with emo fashion. There's a bit of emo in my own wardrobe. For example, I'm a fan of glasses with thick black frames. They look cool and they work on me. If you saw me on the street, you probably wouldn't say, "holy shit that guy's emo," but yeah, there's some emo influence there.

I do, however, have a problem with middle-class white kids who whine about how much their life sucks. I want to beat the shit out of all of them. The whiny little fucks are among the most priviledged demographics in the history of humanity. The whole "woe is me, I'm all misunderstood and oppressed and downtrodden" act isn't going to fly with anyone who has a proper understanding of perspective.

What we should do is require them trade places with someone in some impoverished third-world shithole. They don't get to come back until their third-world counterpart decides that American middle-class suburban life is too hard.

(For the record, I am an American middle-class white boy who grew up in the suburbs. The difference between me and annoying emo fucks is that I know how lucky and how priviledged I am to have been born into this world. Sure, I have the occasional bad day, but I never whine about how much my life sucks, because compared to most of the world, it totally doesn't.)

ICY
3rd September 06, 08:50 PM
Because it sucks. If you need a further explaination...die.

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
3rd September 06, 09:04 PM
http://www.ninjapirate.com/emo.html

Yiktin Voxbane
3rd September 06, 09:56 PM
http://www.kittensofdarkness.net/gallery/knimages/emos.jpg

Source

http://www.kittensofdarkness.net/gallery/index.htm

ThaiBoxerShorts
3rd September 06, 10:01 PM
http://www.kittensofdarkness.net/gallery/knimages/emos.jpg

Source

http://www.kittensofdarkness.net/gallery/index.htm
Holy shit that site is hilarious.

The emo pic is kinda lame, though.

AAAhmed46
3rd September 06, 10:02 PM
Ive never really understood what the hell an EMO is.

I just thought it was some ultra-sensitive whiney bitch ass person.

ThaiBoxerShorts
3rd September 06, 10:05 PM
Ive never really understood what the hell an EMO is.

I just thought it was some ultra-sensitive whiney bitch ass person.
So what part don't you understand?

AAAhmed46
3rd September 06, 10:22 PM
Emo culture, thats what i dont understand, looking over this thread i learned that they have thier own little hairstyle and music.

I never knew this, i thought they were smattered over a various cultures and sub-cultures.

I didnt know they had thier own specific sub-culture.

I need to get out more.....

ThaiBoxerShorts
3rd September 06, 10:42 PM
Ah. Yes, there's a whole subculture built around being ultra-sensitive whiny bitch ass people.

AAAhmed46
3rd September 06, 11:28 PM
Ah. Yes, there's a whole subculture built around being ultra-sensitive whiny bitch ass people.

Exactly, and that surprises me.

ICY
4th September 06, 12:13 AM
They used to be called "hippies".

AAAhmed46
4th September 06, 12:38 AM
They used to be called "hippies".

But hippies used to have more balls.

ThaiBoxerShorts
4th September 06, 12:46 AM
They used to be called "hippies".
I disagree. While hippies were annoying and whiny, they at least had the ability to conceptualize things greater than their own puny lives. They had a better understanding of perspective. They didn't have the morbid self-obsession that defines
emo-ness.

Diggler McFeely
4th September 06, 01:10 AM
Emo is awesome. Anyone who thinks (or says) otherwise, sucks cock by choice.

kungfujew
4th September 06, 02:58 AM
Anyone who thinks (or says) otherwise, sucks cock by choice.

You say that like it's a bad thing.

ICY
4th September 06, 03:00 AM
Emo is awesome. Anyone who thinks (or says) otherwise, sucks cock by choice.

That is an insignificant and irrelevant detail.

kungfujew
4th September 06, 03:02 AM
KFJ and ICY:

http://powet.tv/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2006/04/ambiguously_gay_duo.jpg

Yiktin Voxbane
4th September 06, 08:55 AM
Emo is awesome. Anyone who thinks (or says) otherwise, sucks cock by choice.

Where do I kinow this line from ?

Movie?
Game?

I seek enlightenment.

Teh El Macho
4th September 06, 09:19 AM
It is not much about the music, but the people who sings it and the imbeciles who usually listen to it. EMO music and EMO kids (in particular EMO male kids) embodie everything not normal with wimpiness, pussyness and whinines.

The whole genre is abnormally whiny. I can understand EMO chicks (after all chicks love drama and shit), but EMO kids, no. Men are not supposed to be whimpy, whiny little motherfucking pussies. It's abnormal.

I hate abnormal.

Teh El Macho
4th September 06, 09:20 AM
Emo is awesome. Anyone who thinks (or says) otherwise, sucks cock by choice.BWHAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA HAHHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHBHWHAH BHWABHWABHWAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHAAHAHAHHAHAA!!

Oh wait... shit. You were serious? Oh well...


BWHAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHAHA HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHBHWHAH BHWABHWABHWAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHAAHAHAHHAHAA!!

Phrost
4th September 06, 09:41 AM
Emo is bullshit because only in America could spoiled suburban teens who've never seen a day of hardship be that fucking self-centered as to think the petty shit in their lives is worth crying and being depressed over.

TonyM
4th September 06, 10:04 AM
It's pussy whiney priviliged white boy shit. It sucks.

Truculent Sheep
4th September 06, 10:25 AM
Emo is victim music. So was nu metal and, dare I say it, even the blues. But at least nu metal had a spiky edge and the blues were rooted in very real suffering and hardship (at least, until Eric Clapton was let loose on it). Yet emo is the indulgent whining of those who are so dislocated from life that they actually see pain as a fashion accessory. It's the sort of decadence that lead to Europe eagerly embracing war in 1914, and that's scary.

Da_AzN
4th September 06, 10:48 AM
another follow up question:

Ok... so emo kids are white suburban who are among the most priviledged members of the human race... and still whine... completely detatched from reality... etc...

Are these legit reasons to whine?

a) dumped by girlfriend//boyfriend
b) never gotten laid or had a girlfriend//boyfriend
c) getting grounded for a week by the parents
d) having no friends
e) getting bullied in school
f) being a social outcast
g) shitty evil parents who have favoritism or are physically and/or verbally abusive, drunkards, adulterers, do not appreciate, etc...

On side note, people commit suicide for the following reasons I just said... :(

ThaiBoxerShorts
4th September 06, 12:02 PM
another follow up question:

Ok... so emo kids are white suburban who are among the most priviledged members of the human race... and still whine... completely detatched from reality... etc...

Are these legit reasons to whine?

a) dumped by girlfriend//boyfriend
b) never gotten laid or had a girlfriend//boyfriend
c) getting grounded for a week by the parents
d) having no friends
e) getting bullied in school
f) being a social outcast
g) shitty evil parents who have favoritism or are physically and/or verbally abusive, drunkards, adulterers, do not appreciate, etc...

On side note, people commit suicide for the following reasons I just said... :(
Most of those are things that everyone has to deal with at some point in their life, and the rest are things that can be changed if they stop whining and take some damn responsibility for their life and actively try to impove it.

They are, perhaps, legitimate reason to seek therapy, if necessary. There's no shame in that.

But there's no such thing as a legitimate reason to whine.

Neildo
4th September 06, 12:24 PM
Those things build character.


Man up and stop being EMO.

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
4th September 06, 02:41 PM
Can I be emo with blonde hair? Or do I have to dye it first?

Neildo
4th September 06, 02:44 PM
That, and i think you need think-framed glasses and a studded belt. And girls jeans.

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
4th September 06, 02:46 PM
Fuck it. I hate ball-busting jeans.

Da_AzN
4th September 06, 03:04 PM
Those things build character.


Man up and stop being EMO.

WAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!!

But I'm not a suburban kid... no... in fact, I'm not white!!!

How can it possibly be? How can I possibly become an emo? Will the white emo kids accept me for who I am? Will they treat me as an equal? Or will they be racist fucks? Are emos the same as kuklux klan? since they seem just as miserable...

I can make my eyes blue. I'll wear contact lenses...

but... How can I turn my skin white to be accepted? Will I take a bath in white paint? or should I bleach myself? I'm thinking of imitating michael jackson... but I have no money. Its too expensive to go through all that operation just to become a white man.

WAAAAAAAAHHHHH!!!! I can't take it anymore!!! life really sucks being an azn kid!!! not even the emo kids will accept me!!! WAAAAAAAHHHHH!!!!!! Will the emo girls laugh at my penis size? Or is my penis gonna be larger than that of her emo boyfriend? Will she dump him and come to me? Will she think I'm not in touch with my feelings enough? I'm trying to... but there is no way in hell I'd be as in touch with my feelings!!!

I spend alot of money on rent and pay the bills!!! I dont have enough money to buy an entire emo-looking wardrobe!!!

And what kind of lyrics will I write? Will they laugh at me if I write emo poetry in another language?


Man... I can never be an emo. I'm so depressed. I wanna cry. Just thinking about me not being able to become an emo makes me wanna slit my wrists!!!


WAAAAAAAAAHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Neildo
4th September 06, 03:07 PM
Oh snap, sorry bro.


Just be good at math and drive a modded ricer like all the other azn d00ds. you'll be fine.

AAAhmed46
4th September 06, 03:20 PM
WAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!!

But I'm not a suburban kid... no... in fact, I'm not white!!!

How can it possibly be? How can I possibly become an emo? Will the white emo kids accept me for who I am? Will they treat me as an equal? Or will they be racist fucks? Are emos the same as kuklux klan? since they seem just as miserable...

I can make my eyes blue. I'll wear contact lenses...

but... How can I turn my skin white to be accepted? Will I take a bath in white paint? or should I bleach myself? I'm thinking of imitating michael jackson... but I have no money. Its too expensive to go through all that operation just to become a white man.

WAAAAAAAAHHHHH!!!! I can't take it anymore!!! life really sucks being an azn kid!!! not even the emo kids will accept me!!! WAAAAAAAHHHHH!!!!!! Will the emo girls laugh at my penis size? Or is my penis gonna be larger than that of her emo boyfriend? Will she dump him and come to me? Will she think I'm not in touch with my feelings enough? I'm trying to... but there is no way in hell I'd be as in touch with my feelings!!!

I spend alot of money on rent and pay the bills!!! I dont have enough money to buy an entire emo-looking wardrobe!!!

And what kind of lyrics will I write? Will they laugh at me if I write emo poetry in another language?


Man... I can never be an emo. I'm so depressed. I wanna cry. Just thinking about me not being able to become an emo makes me wanna slit my wrists!!!


WAAAAAAAAAHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Cut your eyes so they look bigger, Dye your hair and no one will know the difference! You will be a crazy White emo who's really an asian in disguise!







Ok... so emo kids are white suburban who are among the most priviledged members of the human race... and still whine... completely detatched from reality... etc...

Are these legit reasons to whine?

a) dumped by girlfriend//boyfriend
b) never gotten laid or had a girlfriend//boyfriend
c) getting grounded for a week by the parents
d) having no friends
e) getting bullied in school
f) being a social outcast
g) shitty evil parents who have favoritism or are physically and/or verbally abusive, drunkards, adulterers, do not appreciate, etc...

On side note, people commit suicide for the following reasons I just said... :(

Ill admit....alot of those things would upset me too....

But instead of being emo i would get pissed offf.


Like fucking Rambo.

Da_AzN
4th September 06, 04:42 PM
Cut your eyes so they look bigger, Dye your hair and no one will know the difference! You will be a crazy White emo who's really an asian in disguise!



Are you crazy? I'm gonna become blind!!!

How will I be able to see where to cut my wrists? And how will I know when I've cut my wrist enough to gain the world's attention to the plight of the poor, forgotten, miserable suburban emo white kids?!?

What if... emos arent racist and they welcome me with open arms? how will I be able to see their beautiful faces and colorful hair? At least I wanna see the person who I shake hands with.

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
4th September 06, 04:44 PM
No need to worry about not being white, you're too much of a faggot to be accepted into any social clique.

ThaiBoxerShorts
4th September 06, 04:52 PM
No need to worry about not being white, you're too much of a faggot to be accepted into any social clique.
But isn't that where emos came from in the first place? People who were rejected by every other social clique, so they banded together and founded the emo subculture?

If even they are rejecting people now, it's only a matter of time before a new clique forms below emos. We're going to need a name for them. Suggestions?

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
4th September 06, 05:05 PM
No, emo evolved so today's teens could be different from yesterday's teens. No one wants to be a mohawked punker, because their dad probably had a mohawk too.

Neildo
4th September 06, 05:10 PM
HAHA

That makes me laugh because my dad told me about when he was a kid, they used to bleach the tips of their hair.

Just like AZN kids do today! BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAW

WarPhalange
4th September 06, 05:19 PM
Fuck it. I hate ball-busting jeans.
God damn. I started buying jeans a few months ago (didn't really like them until then... still not crazy about them)

I try on a normal pair. FUCK!! I can't breathe. I look to see if maybe someone stuck a small size or whatever. No. They are supposed to be like that. Only the super loose kind fit me. Anything else is just infinite pain. And I'm not even trying to brag or anything. I'm white.

So I can't understand how Emers wear girl jeans. =/

Neildo
4th September 06, 05:23 PM
No balls? The Emers I mean. (Emers, Nice.)

AAAhmed46
4th September 06, 05:26 PM
Are you crazy? I'm gonna become blind!!!

How will I be able to see where to cut my wrists? And how will I know when I've cut my wrist enough to gain the world's attention to the plight of the poor, forgotten, miserable suburban emo white kids?!?

What if... emos arent racist and they welcome me with open arms? how will I be able to see their beautiful faces and colorful hair? At least I wanna see the person who I shake hands with.

Cut that asian skin in your eyes that makes your eyes asiany!!!

Then you can walk around claiming your a white kid!

Truculent Sheep
4th September 06, 05:38 PM
If even they are rejecting people now, it's only a matter of time before a new clique forms below emos. We're going to need a name for them. Suggestions?

Twats?

Neildo
4th September 06, 05:40 PM
EMO's aren't good enough to be called twats.

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
4th September 06, 06:26 PM
God damn. I started buying jeans a few months ago (didn't really like them until then... still not crazy about them)

I try on a normal pair. FUCK!! I can't breathe. I look to see if maybe someone stuck a small size or whatever. No. They are supposed to be like that. Only the super loose kind fit me. Anything else is just infinite pain. And I'm not even trying to brag or anything. I'm white.

So I can't understand how Emers wear girl jeans. =/

I have the same problem. My waist is like 28 and my inseam is also 28 or so, but 28x28 jeans won't fit me at all. I don't even like one that are only a little too big. I buy absurdly huge jeans, like 34 or 36xwhatever and roll up the cuffs.

AAAhmed46
5th September 06, 12:44 AM
EMO's aren't good enough to be called twats.

Yeah, atleast Twats have SOMETHING likable about them.

WarPhalange
5th September 06, 11:38 AM
I have the same problem. My waist is like 28 and my inseam is also 28 or so, but 28x28 jeans won't fit me at all. I don't even like one that are only a little too big. I buy absurdly huge jeans, like 34 or 36xwhatever and roll up the cuffs.
That's because you're a wigger.

I, on the other hand, simply have huge genitalia.

EDIT: I don't buy bigger sizes, I just find the "ULTRA LOOSE CUT OMG THE GUY DIDN'T EVEN SOW THEM TOGETHER!" kind.

Ecks
5th September 06, 03:01 PM
Only in sociocide can you get from a discussion on emo to wiggers.

And the only thing I hate more than emo kids are Asian emo kids. Being Asian myself, I want to fucking shoot and lambaste all those A-mos. We get enough stereotypes as it is lol.

WarPhalange
5th September 06, 04:43 PM
It's a good thing you're Asian, or else I'd have to call you a racist.

VikingPower
5th September 06, 04:58 PM
EMO IS FOR SISSY LIMP-WRISTED MOMMA'S BOYS.

That's why we hate it.

End of discussion.

Da_AzN
5th September 06, 05:22 PM
emos and wiggers have fought before. There's an old video of it I cant remember exactly the link. check youtube or psfights.com

The emo actually knew how to beat up the wigger.

But the wigger's friends ganged up on the emo and beat the crap outta him.


Too bad... the emo and his friends wont be chasing after the wiggers and cutting them with their razorblades cuz they will be too busy crying over it.

Actually emos should cut up wiggers for a change. Instead of their own wrists. I wanna see a group of emos kidnap a wigger and behead him with a razorblade...

just like good old al-zarqawi. :)

DokterVet
8th September 06, 12:35 AM
I can see why people don't like emo, but I happen to like it a lot.
I don't keep up with the fashion, so I look like a normal person, but I have been into that music scene for years. I guess you're all going to beat me up now.

WarPhalange
9th September 06, 01:10 AM
Emo: Where the Girls Aren't by Jessica Hopper from PP56


A few months back, I was at a Strike Anywhere show. The band launched into Refusal; a song offering solidarity with the feminist movement and bearing witness to the inherent struggle in women’s lives. It is not a song of protection; there is no romantic undertow. It’s a song about all people being equally important. Everyone was dancing, fanboys and girls at the lip of the stage screaming along, like so many shows at the Fireside. By the first chorus of the song, I was in tears. I have often been so moved to shed small wet tears at Strike shows, but this time was for AN entirely different reason. A mournful new awareness: I am here, at the Fireside Bowl probably 75 times a year for the last five years. The numbers of times I have genuinely felt, or even sensed my reality or the reality of the women I know portrayed in a song sung by male-fronted band, that number was at zero and holding. The ratio of songs/shows/expressed sentiment-to-affirmation of feminist struggle/girldom is staggering. This song was the first.

No wonder most of my girlfriends and I have being growing increasingly alienated and distanced from our varying scenes, or have begun taking shelter from emo’s pervasive stronghold in the cave-like recesses of electronic, DJ or experimental music. No wonder girls I know are feeling dismissive and faithless towards music. No wonder I feel much more internal allegiance to MOP songs, as their tales of hood drama and jewelry theft FEELS far less offensive than yet another song from yet another all dude band giving us the 411 on his personal romantic holocaust. Because in 2003, as it stands, I simply cannot conjure the effort it takes to give a flying fuck about bands of boys yoked to their own wounding AKA the genre/plague that we know as E-M-O. Songs and scenes populated with myopic worldviews that do not extend beyond their velvet-lined rebel-trauma, their bodies, or their vans. Meanwhile, we’re left wondering how did we get here?
As hardcore and political punk’s charged sentiments became more cliché towards the end of the 80skas we all soon settled in to the armchair comfort of the Clinton era Punk began stripping off its tuff skin and getting down to its squishy pulp heart. Forget bombs and the real impact of trickle down economics, it’s all about elusive kisses and tender-yet-undeniably-masculine emotional outbursts. Mixtapes across America became soiled with torrential anthems of hopeful boy hearts masted to sleeves, pillows soaked in tears, and relational eulogies. Romance of the self was on.

I think somewhere right around the release of the last Braid record, is where we lost the map. Up until then, things seemed reasonable, encouraging, exciting, thus far we were sold on vulnerability, there was something revivifying in the earnestness. New bands cast their entire micro-careers from bands we all liked: Jawbox, Jawbreaker, Sunny Day Real Estate etc. In those bands, there were songs about women, but they were girls with names, with details to their lives, girls who weren’t exclusively defined by their absence or lensed through romantic-spectre. Jawbox’s most popular song, “Savory” was about recognizing male normative privilege, about the weight of sexualization on a woman (“see you feign surprise / that I’m all eyes”). In Jawbreaker songs women had leverage, had life, had animus and agency to them. Sometimes they were friends, or a sister, not always girl to be bedded or pursued or dumped by. They were accurate, and touched by reality.

And then something broke. And it wasn’t Bob Nanna’s or Mr. Dashboard’s sensitive hearts. Records by a legion of done-wrong boys lined the record store shelves. Every record was a concept album about a breakup, damning the girl on the other side. Emo’s contentious monologue it’s balled fist Peter Pan mash-note dilemmas it’s album length letters from pussy-jail it’s cathedral building in ode to man-pain and Robert-Bly-isms it’s woman-induced misery has gone from being descriptive to being prescriptive. Emo was just another forum where women were locked in a stasis of outside observation, observing ourselves through the eyes of others. The prevalence of these bands, the omni-presence of emo’s sweeping sound and it’s growing stronghold in the media and on the Billboard chart codified emo as A SOUND, where previously there had been diversity.

Girls in emo songs today do not have names. We are not identified. Our lives, our struggles, our day-to-day-to-day does not exist, we do not get colored in. We span from coquettish to damned and back again. We leave bruises on boy-hearts, but make no other mark. Our existences, our actions are portrayed SOLELY through the detailing of neurotic self-entanglements of the boy singer our region of personal power, simply, is our breadth of impact on his romantic life. We are on a short leash in a filthy yard-we are mysteries to be unlocked, bodies to be groped, minimum wage earners of fealty, harvesters of sorrow, repositories for scorn. Vessels redeemed in the light of boy-love. On a pedestal, on our backs. Muses at best. Cum rags or invisible at worst. Check out our pictures on the covers of records-we are sad-eyed and winsome and well cleaved Thank you Hot Rod Circuit, The Crush, Cursive, Something Corporate-the fantasy girl you could take home and comfort.

It is a genre made by and for adolescent and post adolescent boys, who make evident, in their lyrics and dominant aesthetic that their knowledge of actual living, breathing women is tiny enough to fit in a shoebox. Emo’s characteristic sensitive front is limited to self-sensitivity, it runs in a fanciful maze of reflexive self pity, rife with a vulnerability that is infinitely self-serving. It is a high stakes game of control,of winning, or losing possession of the girl (see Dashboard Confessional, Brand New, New Found Glory and Glassjaw albums for prime examples) Yet, in the vulnerability there is no empathy, no peerage or parallelism. Emo’s yearning is not to identify with, or understand, but rather to enforce sexual hierarchy and omit women’s power via romanticide.

As Andy Greenwald notes in his forthcoming book about emo culture Nothing Feels Good: PUNK ROCK, TEENAGERS, AND EMO, lyrically, emo singers revel in their misery and suffering to an almost ecstatic degree, but with a limited use of subtlety and language. It tends to come off like Rimbaud relocated to the Food Court. Women in emo songs are denied the dignity of humanization through both the language and narratives, we are omnipresent, but our only consequence is in romantic setting; denying any possibility or hope for life outside the margins, where they express a free sexual, creative or political will.
***
On a dancefloor in Seattle, a boy I know decides to plumb the topic,

“I heard you’re writing a column about how emo is sexist”
“I am.”
“What do you mean ‘emo is sexist?' Emo songs are no different than all of rock history, than Rolling Stones or Led Zeppelin.”
“I know. I’d rather not get into right now.
“How are songs about breaking up sexist though? Everyone breaks up. If you have a problem with emo, you have a problem with all of rock history!”
“I know. I do.”
And to paraphrase words of Nixon sidekick HR Haldeman, “History is wack.”

There must be some discussion, at least for context, about the well-worn narrative of the travails of the boy rebel’s broken heart as exemplified in the last 50 years of blues-based music. There must be some base acknowledgement that in almost every band since the beginning of time, most songs are about loving and losing women. Granted, broken hearts are a part of human existence. Songs about women but not written by women, practically define rock n roll. And as a woman, as a music critic, as someone who lives and dies for music, there is a rift within, a struggle of how much deference you will allow, and how much you will ignore because you like the music.

Can you ignore the lyrical content of the Stones “Under my Thumb” because you like the song? Are you willing to? How much attention can you sacrifice to the cock-prance of Led Zeppelin or cheesy humpa-humpa metaphors of AC/DC or the heaping pile of dead or brutalized women that amasses in Big Black’s discography? Is emo exceptional in the scope of the rock canon in terms of treatment of women or in it’s continual rubbing salute to it’s own trouble-boy cliché image? Is there anything that separates Dashboard Confessional’s condemnation of his bedhopping betrayer and makes it any more damning than any woman/mother/whore/ex-girlfriend showing up in songs of Jane’s Addiction, Nick Cave, The Animals or Justin Timberlake? Can you compartmentalize and not judge the woe towards women readily exemplified in most of the recorded catalog of Zeppelin because the first eight bars of “Communication Breakdown” is, as the parlance goes, total fucking godhead? Where do you split? Do you bother to even care, because if yr going to try and kick against it, you, as my dancing friend says “have a problem with all of rock history.”, and because who, other than a petty, too serious bitch dismisses Zeppelin?! Do you accept the circumstances and phallocentiricites of the last 50+ years of music, as it exists in popular culture and in your “punk rock community” as simply how it is?

Who do you excuse and why? Do you check your personality and your politics at the door and just dance or just rock or just let side A spin out? Can you ignore the marginalization of lady-lives that line your record shelves, and give yourself where you can to where you identify, bridging the sometimes massive gulf, because it’s either that or purge your collection of everything but wordless free jazz / German micro house 12�s and/or Mr. Lady Records releases.

It is almost too big of a question to ask. I start to ask this of myself, to really start investigating, and stop, realizing full well that if I get an answer I may just have to retire to an adobe hut on some Italian mountainside and not take any visitors for a long time. Or turn into the rock critical Andrea Dworkin, and report with ruthless resignation that all male-manufactured music is in service of the continual oppression and domination of women. Sometimes I feel like every rock song I hear is a sexualized sucker punch towards us. And I feel like no one takes the breadth of that impact seriously, or even notices it most days.

My deepest concerns about the punishing effects of the emo-tidal-wave is not so much for myself or for my immediate-peer lady friends who can fend and snarl from the safety of our personal-political platforms and deep crated record collections, but rather, for the girls I see crowding front and center for the emo shows. The ones who are young, for whom this is likely their inaugural introduction to the underground, who’s gateway may have been through Weezer or the Vagrant America tour or maybe Dashboard Confessional’s Unplugged sesh on the MTV. The ones who are seeking music out, who are wanting to stake some claim to punk rock, or an underground avenue, for a way out, a way under, to sate the seemingly unquenchable, nameless need the same need I know I came to punk rock with. It becomes a very particular concern because Emo is the province of the young, their foundation is fresh-laid, my concern is for people who have no other previous acquaintance with the underground aside from the shadowy doom and octave chords that the Vagrant Records roster hath wrought.
When I was that age, I too had a rabid hunger for a music that spoke a language I was just starting to decipher, music that affirmed my faith, my ninth grade fuck you values, and encouraged me to not allow my budding feminist ways to be bludgeoned by all the soul crushing weight of mainstream culture. I was lucky I was met at the door with things like the Bikini Kill demo, or Fugazi or the first Kill Rock Stars comp, or Babes in Toyland shows. I was met with polemics and respectful address. I was met with girl heroes in guitar squall, kicking out the jams under the stage lights. I was being hurtled towards deeper rewards, records and bands were triggering ideas and wrenching open doors of interminable hope and inspiration. I acknowledge the importance of all of that because I know I would not be who I am now, doing what I do, 12 years down the line, if I had not had gotten those fundamentals, been presented with those ideas about what music, or moreover, what life can be about.

And so I watch these girls at emo shows more than I ever do the band. I watch them sing along, see what parts they freak out over. I wonder if this does it for them, if seeing these bands, these dudes on stage resonates and inspires them to want to pick up a guitar or drum sticks. Or if they just see this as something dudes do, because there are no girls, there is no them up there. I wonder if they are being thwarted by the FACT that there is no presentation of girls as participants, but rather, only as consumers, or if we reference the songs directly, the consumed. I wonder if this is where music will begin and end for them. If they can be radicalized in spite of this. If being denied keys to the clubhouse or airtime will spur them into action.

I know that, for me, as an auto-didactic teenaged bitch, who thought her every idea was a good idea worthy of expression and audience, it did not truly occur to me to start a band until I saw other women playing music (Babes in Toyland, early 1990). Up until then, seeing Bloodline chugga-chugga it up 97 times on local hardcore bills had not done it for me. Dinosaur Jr’s hairwaving and soloing had not done it for me. The dozens of bands, bands who’s records I knew all the words to, who were comprised of 25-30 year old dudes, with nothing much to say, did not feel like punk rock with it’s arms open wide to me. It took seeing Bikini Kill in an illegal basement venue to truly throw the lights, to show me that there was more than one place, one role, for women to occupy, and that our participation was important and vital. It was YOU MATTER writ large.

I don’t want these front row girls to miss that. I don’t want girls leaving clubs denied of encouragement and potential, quietly vexed and clad in the burka of emo’s male dominance. Because as fucking lame as punk rock can be, as hollow as all of our self serving claims ring that punk rock’s culture is something TRULY DIFFERENT (sic) than median society at it’s gnarled foundations still exists the possibilities for connection, for exposure to radical notions, for punk rock to match up to the elaborate idea of what many kids dream, or hope for it to mean for all of that to absolutely and totally exist I believe much of that hinges on the continual presence of radicalized women within the leagues, and those women being encouraged, given reasons to stay, to want to belong, rather than punished or diminished by the music which glues the various fractious communities together.
Us girls deserve more than one song. We deserve more than one pledge of solidarity. We deserve better songs than any boy will ever write about us.

AAAhmed46
9th September 06, 01:39 AM
Emo: Where the Girls Aren't by Jessica Hopper from PP56


A few months back, I was at a Strike Anywhere show. The band launched into Refusal; a song offering solidarity with the feminist movement and bearing witness to the inherent struggle in women’s lives. It is not a song of protection; there is no romantic undertow. It’s a song about all people being equally important. Everyone was dancing, fanboys and girls at the lip of the stage screaming along, like so many shows at the Fireside. By the first chorus of the song, I was in tears. I have often been so moved to shed small wet tears at Strike shows, but this time was for AN entirely different reason. A mournful new awareness: I am here, at the Fireside Bowl probably 75 times a year for the last five years. The numbers of times I have genuinely felt, or even sensed my reality or the reality of the women I know portrayed in a song sung by male-fronted band, that number was at zero and holding. The ratio of songs/shows/expressed sentiment-to-affirmation of feminist struggle/girldom is staggering. This song was the first.

No wonder most of my girlfriends and I have being growing increasingly alienated and distanced from our varying scenes, or have begun taking shelter from emo’s pervasive stronghold in the cave-like recesses of electronic, DJ or experimental music. No wonder girls I know are feeling dismissive and faithless towards music. No wonder I feel much more internal allegiance to MOP songs, as their tales of hood drama and jewelry theft FEELS far less offensive than yet another song from yet another all dude band giving us the 411 on his personal romantic holocaust. Because in 2003, as it stands, I simply cannot conjure the effort it takes to give a flying fuck about bands of boys yoked to their own wounding AKA the genre/plague that we know as E-M-O. Songs and scenes populated with myopic worldviews that do not extend beyond their velvet-lined rebel-trauma, their bodies, or their vans. Meanwhile, we’re left wondering how did we get here?
As hardcore and political punk’s charged sentiments became more cliché towards the end of the 80skas we all soon settled in to the armchair comfort of the Clinton era Punk began stripping off its tuff skin and getting down to its squishy pulp heart. Forget bombs and the real impact of trickle down economics, it’s all about elusive kisses and tender-yet-undeniably-masculine emotional outbursts. Mixtapes across America became soiled with torrential anthems of hopeful boy hearts masted to sleeves, pillows soaked in tears, and relational eulogies. Romance of the self was on.

I think somewhere right around the release of the last Braid record, is where we lost the map. Up until then, things seemed reasonable, encouraging, exciting, thus far we were sold on vulnerability, there was something revivifying in the earnestness. New bands cast their entire micro-careers from bands we all liked: Jawbox, Jawbreaker, Sunny Day Real Estate etc. In those bands, there were songs about women, but they were girls with names, with details to their lives, girls who weren’t exclusively defined by their absence or lensed through romantic-spectre. Jawbox’s most popular song, “Savory” was about recognizing male normative privilege, about the weight of sexualization on a woman (“see you feign surprise / that I’m all eyes”). In Jawbreaker songs women had leverage, had life, had animus and agency to them. Sometimes they were friends, or a sister, not always girl to be bedded or pursued or dumped by. They were accurate, and touched by reality.

And then something broke. And it wasn’t Bob Nanna’s or Mr. Dashboard’s sensitive hearts. Records by a legion of done-wrong boys lined the record store shelves. Every record was a concept album about a breakup, damning the girl on the other side. Emo’s contentious monologue it’s balled fist Peter Pan mash-note dilemmas it’s album length letters from pussy-jail it’s cathedral building in ode to man-pain and Robert-Bly-isms it’s woman-induced misery has gone from being descriptive to being prescriptive. Emo was just another forum where women were locked in a stasis of outside observation, observing ourselves through the eyes of others. The prevalence of these bands, the omni-presence of emo’s sweeping sound and it’s growing stronghold in the media and on the Billboard chart codified emo as A SOUND, where previously there had been diversity.

Girls in emo songs today do not have names. We are not identified. Our lives, our struggles, our day-to-day-to-day does not exist, we do not get colored in. We span from coquettish to damned and back again. We leave bruises on boy-hearts, but make no other mark. Our existences, our actions are portrayed SOLELY through the detailing of neurotic self-entanglements of the boy singer our region of personal power, simply, is our breadth of impact on his romantic life. We are on a short leash in a filthy yard-we are mysteries to be unlocked, bodies to be groped, minimum wage earners of fealty, harvesters of sorrow, repositories for scorn. Vessels redeemed in the light of boy-love. On a pedestal, on our backs. Muses at best. Cum rags or invisible at worst. Check out our pictures on the covers of records-we are sad-eyed and winsome and well cleaved Thank you Hot Rod Circuit, The Crush, Cursive, Something Corporate-the fantasy girl you could take home and comfort.

It is a genre made by and for adolescent and post adolescent boys, who make evident, in their lyrics and dominant aesthetic that their knowledge of actual living, breathing women is tiny enough to fit in a shoebox. Emo’s characteristic sensitive front is limited to self-sensitivity, it runs in a fanciful maze of reflexive self pity, rife with a vulnerability that is infinitely self-serving. It is a high stakes game of control,of winning, or losing possession of the girl (see Dashboard Confessional, Brand New, New Found Glory and Glassjaw albums for prime examples) Yet, in the vulnerability there is no empathy, no peerage or parallelism. Emo’s yearning is not to identify with, or understand, but rather to enforce sexual hierarchy and omit women’s power via romanticide.

As Andy Greenwald notes in his forthcoming book about emo culture Nothing Feels Good: PUNK ROCK, TEENAGERS, AND EMO, lyrically, emo singers revel in their misery and suffering to an almost ecstatic degree, but with a limited use of subtlety and language. It tends to come off like Rimbaud relocated to the Food Court. Women in emo songs are denied the dignity of humanization through both the language and narratives, we are omnipresent, but our only consequence is in romantic setting; denying any possibility or hope for life outside the margins, where they express a free sexual, creative or political will.
***
On a dancefloor in Seattle, a boy I know decides to plumb the topic,

“I heard you’re writing a column about how emo is sexist”
“I am.”
“What do you mean ‘emo is sexist?' Emo songs are no different than all of rock history, than Rolling Stones or Led Zeppelin.”
“I know. I’d rather not get into right now.
“How are songs about breaking up sexist though? Everyone breaks up. If you have a problem with emo, you have a problem with all of rock history!”
“I know. I do.”
And to paraphrase words of Nixon sidekick HR Haldeman, “History is wack.”

There must be some discussion, at least for context, about the well-worn narrative of the travails of the boy rebel’s broken heart as exemplified in the last 50 years of blues-based music. There must be some base acknowledgement that in almost every band since the beginning of time, most songs are about loving and losing women. Granted, broken hearts are a part of human existence. Songs about women but not written by women, practically define rock n roll. And as a woman, as a music critic, as someone who lives and dies for music, there is a rift within, a struggle of how much deference you will allow, and how much you will ignore because you like the music.

Can you ignore the lyrical content of the Stones “Under my Thumb” because you like the song? Are you willing to? How much attention can you sacrifice to the cock-prance of Led Zeppelin or cheesy humpa-humpa metaphors of AC/DC or the heaping pile of dead or brutalized women that amasses in Big Black’s discography? Is emo exceptional in the scope of the rock canon in terms of treatment of women or in it’s continual rubbing salute to it’s own trouble-boy cliché image? Is there anything that separates Dashboard Confessional’s condemnation of his bedhopping betrayer and makes it any more damning than any woman/mother/whore/ex-girlfriend showing up in songs of Jane’s Addiction, Nick Cave, The Animals or Justin Timberlake? Can you compartmentalize and not judge the woe towards women readily exemplified in most of the recorded catalog of Zeppelin because the first eight bars of “Communication Breakdown” is, as the parlance goes, total fucking godhead? Where do you split? Do you bother to even care, because if yr going to try and kick against it, you, as my dancing friend says “have a problem with all of rock history.”, and because who, other than a petty, too serious bitch dismisses Zeppelin?! Do you accept the circumstances and phallocentiricites of the last 50+ years of music, as it exists in popular culture and in your “punk rock community” as simply how it is?

Who do you excuse and why? Do you check your personality and your politics at the door and just dance or just rock or just let side A spin out? Can you ignore the marginalization of lady-lives that line your record shelves, and give yourself where you can to where you identify, bridging the sometimes massive gulf, because it’s either that or purge your collection of everything but wordless free jazz / German micro house 12�s and/or Mr. Lady Records releases.

It is almost too big of a question to ask. I start to ask this of myself, to really start investigating, and stop, realizing full well that if I get an answer I may just have to retire to an adobe hut on some Italian mountainside and not take any visitors for a long time. Or turn into the rock critical Andrea Dworkin, and report with ruthless resignation that all male-manufactured music is in service of the continual oppression and domination of women. Sometimes I feel like every rock song I hear is a sexualized sucker punch towards us. And I feel like no one takes the breadth of that impact seriously, or even notices it most days.

My deepest concerns about the punishing effects of the emo-tidal-wave is not so much for myself or for my immediate-peer lady friends who can fend and snarl from the safety of our personal-political platforms and deep crated record collections, but rather, for the girls I see crowding front and center for the emo shows. The ones who are young, for whom this is likely their inaugural introduction to the underground, who’s gateway may have been through Weezer or the Vagrant America tour or maybe Dashboard Confessional’s Unplugged sesh on the MTV. The ones who are seeking music out, who are wanting to stake some claim to punk rock, or an underground avenue, for a way out, a way under, to sate the seemingly unquenchable, nameless need the same need I know I came to punk rock with. It becomes a very particular concern because Emo is the province of the young, their foundation is fresh-laid, my concern is for people who have no other previous acquaintance with the underground aside from the shadowy doom and octave chords that the Vagrant Records roster hath wrought.
When I was that age, I too had a rabid hunger for a music that spoke a language I was just starting to decipher, music that affirmed my faith, my ninth grade fuck you values, and encouraged me to not allow my budding feminist ways to be bludgeoned by all the soul crushing weight of mainstream culture. I was lucky I was met at the door with things like the Bikini Kill demo, or Fugazi or the first Kill Rock Stars comp, or Babes in Toyland shows. I was met with polemics and respectful address. I was met with girl heroes in guitar squall, kicking out the jams under the stage lights. I was being hurtled towards deeper rewards, records and bands were triggering ideas and wrenching open doors of interminable hope and inspiration. I acknowledge the importance of all of that because I know I would not be who I am now, doing what I do, 12 years down the line, if I had not had gotten those fundamentals, been presented with those ideas about what music, or moreover, what life can be about.

And so I watch these girls at emo shows more than I ever do the band. I watch them sing along, see what parts they freak out over. I wonder if this does it for them, if seeing these bands, these dudes on stage resonates and inspires them to want to pick up a guitar or drum sticks. Or if they just see this as something dudes do, because there are no girls, there is no them up there. I wonder if they are being thwarted by the FACT that there is no presentation of girls as participants, but rather, only as consumers, or if we reference the songs directly, the consumed. I wonder if this is where music will begin and end for them. If they can be radicalized in spite of this. If being denied keys to the clubhouse or airtime will spur them into action.

I know that, for me, as an auto-didactic teenaged bitch, who thought her every idea was a good idea worthy of expression and audience, it did not truly occur to me to start a band until I saw other women playing music (Babes in Toyland, early 1990). Up until then, seeing Bloodline chugga-chugga it up 97 times on local hardcore bills had not done it for me. Dinosaur Jr’s hairwaving and soloing had not done it for me. The dozens of bands, bands who’s records I knew all the words to, who were comprised of 25-30 year old dudes, with nothing much to say, did not feel like punk rock with it’s arms open wide to me. It took seeing Bikini Kill in an illegal basement venue to truly throw the lights, to show me that there was more than one place, one role, for women to occupy, and that our participation was important and vital. It was YOU MATTER writ large.

I don’t want these front row girls to miss that. I don’t want girls leaving clubs denied of encouragement and potential, quietly vexed and clad in the burka of emo’s male dominance. Because as fucking lame as punk rock can be, as hollow as all of our self serving claims ring that punk rock’s culture is something TRULY DIFFERENT (sic) than median society at it’s gnarled foundations still exists the possibilities for connection, for exposure to radical notions, for punk rock to match up to the elaborate idea of what many kids dream, or hope for it to mean for all of that to absolutely and totally exist I believe much of that hinges on the continual presence of radicalized women within the leagues, and those women being encouraged, given reasons to stay, to want to belong, rather than punished or diminished by the music which glues the various fractious communities together.
Us girls deserve more than one song. We deserve more than one pledge of solidarity. We deserve better songs than any boy will ever write about us.

While it underlines the irritating nature of Emo, the whole "EMO is anti-feminist'' is a little over the top i think.

ThaiBoxerShorts
9th September 06, 01:47 AM
Emo: Where the Girls Aren't by Jessica Hopper from PP56


A few months back, I was at a Strike Anywhere show. The band launched into Refusal; a song offering solidarity with the feminist movement and bearing witness to the inherent struggle in women’s lives. It is not a song of protection; there is no romantic undertow. It’s a song about all people being equally important. Everyone was dancing, fanboys and girls at the lip of the stage screaming along, like so many shows at the Fireside. By the first chorus of the song, I was in tears. I have often been so moved to shed small wet tears at Strike shows, but this time was for AN entirely different reason. A mournful new awareness: I am here, at the Fireside Bowl probably 75 times a year for the last five years. The numbers of times I have genuinely felt, or even sensed my reality or the reality of the women I know portrayed in a song sung by male-fronted band, that number was at zero and holding. The ratio of songs/shows/expressed sentiment-to-affirmation of feminist struggle/girldom is staggering. This song was the first.

No wonder most of my girlfriends and I have being growing increasingly alienated and distanced from our varying scenes, or have begun taking shelter from emo’s pervasive stronghold in the cave-like recesses of electronic, DJ or experimental music. No wonder girls I know are feeling dismissive and faithless towards music. No wonder I feel much more internal allegiance to MOP songs, as their tales of hood drama and jewelry theft FEELS far less offensive than yet another song from yet another all dude band giving us the 411 on his personal romantic holocaust. Because in 2003, as it stands, I simply cannot conjure the effort it takes to give a flying fuck about bands of boys yoked to their own wounding AKA the genre/plague that we know as E-M-O. Songs and scenes populated with myopic worldviews that do not extend beyond their velvet-lined rebel-trauma, their bodies, or their vans. Meanwhile, we’re left wondering how did we get here?
As hardcore and political punk’s charged sentiments became more cliché towards the end of the 80skas we all soon settled in to the armchair comfort of the Clinton era Punk began stripping off its tuff skin and getting down to its squishy pulp heart. Forget bombs and the real impact of trickle down economics, it’s all about elusive kisses and tender-yet-undeniably-masculine emotional outbursts. Mixtapes across America became soiled with torrential anthems of hopeful boy hearts masted to sleeves, pillows soaked in tears, and relational eulogies. Romance of the self was on.

I think somewhere right around the release of the last Braid record, is where we lost the map. Up until then, things seemed reasonable, encouraging, exciting, thus far we were sold on vulnerability, there was something revivifying in the earnestness. New bands cast their entire micro-careers from bands we all liked: Jawbox, Jawbreaker, Sunny Day Real Estate etc. In those bands, there were songs about women, but they were girls with names, with details to their lives, girls who weren’t exclusively defined by their absence or lensed through romantic-spectre. Jawbox’s most popular song, “Savory” was about recognizing male normative privilege, about the weight of sexualization on a woman (“see you feign surprise / that I’m all eyes”). In Jawbreaker songs women had leverage, had life, had animus and agency to them. Sometimes they were friends, or a sister, not always girl to be bedded or pursued or dumped by. They were accurate, and touched by reality.

And then something broke. And it wasn’t Bob Nanna’s or Mr. Dashboard’s sensitive hearts. Records by a legion of done-wrong boys lined the record store shelves. Every record was a concept album about a breakup, damning the girl on the other side. Emo’s contentious monologue it’s balled fist Peter Pan mash-note dilemmas it’s album length letters from pussy-jail it’s cathedral building in ode to man-pain and Robert-Bly-isms it’s woman-induced misery has gone from being descriptive to being prescriptive. Emo was just another forum where women were locked in a stasis of outside observation, observing ourselves through the eyes of others. The prevalence of these bands, the omni-presence of emo’s sweeping sound and it’s growing stronghold in the media and on the Billboard chart codified emo as A SOUND, where previously there had been diversity.

Girls in emo songs today do not have names. We are not identified. Our lives, our struggles, our day-to-day-to-day does not exist, we do not get colored in. We span from coquettish to damned and back again. We leave bruises on boy-hearts, but make no other mark. Our existences, our actions are portrayed SOLELY through the detailing of neurotic self-entanglements of the boy singer our region of personal power, simply, is our breadth of impact on his romantic life. We are on a short leash in a filthy yard-we are mysteries to be unlocked, bodies to be groped, minimum wage earners of fealty, harvesters of sorrow, repositories for scorn. Vessels redeemed in the light of boy-love. On a pedestal, on our backs. Muses at best. Cum rags or invisible at worst. Check out our pictures on the covers of records-we are sad-eyed and winsome and well cleaved Thank you Hot Rod Circuit, The Crush, Cursive, Something Corporate-the fantasy girl you could take home and comfort.

It is a genre made by and for adolescent and post adolescent boys, who make evident, in their lyrics and dominant aesthetic that their knowledge of actual living, breathing women is tiny enough to fit in a shoebox. Emo’s characteristic sensitive front is limited to self-sensitivity, it runs in a fanciful maze of reflexive self pity, rife with a vulnerability that is infinitely self-serving. It is a high stakes game of control,of winning, or losing possession of the girl (see Dashboard Confessional, Brand New, New Found Glory and Glassjaw albums for prime examples) Yet, in the vulnerability there is no empathy, no peerage or parallelism. Emo’s yearning is not to identify with, or understand, but rather to enforce sexual hierarchy and omit women’s power via romanticide.

As Andy Greenwald notes in his forthcoming book about emo culture Nothing Feels Good: PUNK ROCK, TEENAGERS, AND EMO, lyrically, emo singers revel in their misery and suffering to an almost ecstatic degree, but with a limited use of subtlety and language. It tends to come off like Rimbaud relocated to the Food Court. Women in emo songs are denied the dignity of humanization through both the language and narratives, we are omnipresent, but our only consequence is in romantic setting; denying any possibility or hope for life outside the margins, where they express a free sexual, creative or political will.
***
On a dancefloor in Seattle, a boy I know decides to plumb the topic,

“I heard you’re writing a column about how emo is sexist”
“I am.”
“What do you mean ‘emo is sexist?' Emo songs are no different than all of rock history, than Rolling Stones or Led Zeppelin.”
“I know. I’d rather not get into right now.
“How are songs about breaking up sexist though? Everyone breaks up. If you have a problem with emo, you have a problem with all of rock history!”
“I know. I do.”
And to paraphrase words of Nixon sidekick HR Haldeman, “History is wack.”

There must be some discussion, at least for context, about the well-worn narrative of the travails of the boy rebel’s broken heart as exemplified in the last 50 years of blues-based music. There must be some base acknowledgement that in almost every band since the beginning of time, most songs are about loving and losing women. Granted, broken hearts are a part of human existence. Songs about women but not written by women, practically define rock n roll. And as a woman, as a music critic, as someone who lives and dies for music, there is a rift within, a struggle of how much deference you will allow, and how much you will ignore because you like the music.

Can you ignore the lyrical content of the Stones “Under my Thumb” because you like the song? Are you willing to? How much attention can you sacrifice to the cock-prance of Led Zeppelin or cheesy humpa-humpa metaphors of AC/DC or the heaping pile of dead or brutalized women that amasses in Big Black’s discography? Is emo exceptional in the scope of the rock canon in terms of treatment of women or in it’s continual rubbing salute to it’s own trouble-boy cliché image? Is there anything that separates Dashboard Confessional’s condemnation of his bedhopping betrayer and makes it any more damning than any woman/mother/whore/ex-girlfriend showing up in songs of Jane’s Addiction, Nick Cave, The Animals or Justin Timberlake? Can you compartmentalize and not judge the woe towards women readily exemplified in most of the recorded catalog of Zeppelin because the first eight bars of “Communication Breakdown” is, as the parlance goes, total fucking godhead? Where do you split? Do you bother to even care, because if yr going to try and kick against it, you, as my dancing friend says “have a problem with all of rock history.”, and because who, other than a petty, too serious bitch dismisses Zeppelin?! Do you accept the circumstances and phallocentiricites of the last 50+ years of music, as it exists in popular culture and in your “punk rock community” as simply how it is?

Who do you excuse and why? Do you check your personality and your politics at the door and just dance or just rock or just let side A spin out? Can you ignore the marginalization of lady-lives that line your record shelves, and give yourself where you can to where you identify, bridging the sometimes massive gulf, because it’s either that or purge your collection of everything but wordless free jazz / German micro house 12?s and/or Mr. Lady Records releases.

It is almost too big of a question to ask. I start to ask this of myself, to really start investigating, and stop, realizing full well that if I get an answer I may just have to retire to an adobe hut on some Italian mountainside and not take any visitors for a long time. Or turn into the rock critical Andrea Dworkin, and report with ruthless resignation that all male-manufactured music is in service of the continual oppression and domination of women. Sometimes I feel like every rock song I hear is a sexualized sucker punch towards us. And I feel like no one takes the breadth of that impact seriously, or even notices it most days.

My deepest concerns about the punishing effects of the emo-tidal-wave is not so much for myself or for my immediate-peer lady friends who can fend and snarl from the safety of our personal-political platforms and deep crated record collections, but rather, for the girls I see crowding front and center for the emo shows. The ones who are young, for whom this is likely their inaugural introduction to the underground, who’s gateway may have been through Weezer or the Vagrant America tour or maybe Dashboard Confessional’s Unplugged sesh on the MTV. The ones who are seeking music out, who are wanting to stake some claim to punk rock, or an underground avenue, for a way out, a way under, to sate the seemingly unquenchable, nameless need the same need I know I came to punk rock with. It becomes a very particular concern because Emo is the province of the young, their foundation is fresh-laid, my concern is for people who have no other previous acquaintance with the underground aside from the shadowy doom and octave chords that the Vagrant Records roster hath wrought.
When I was that age, I too had a rabid hunger for a music that spoke a language I was just starting to decipher, music that affirmed my faith, my ninth grade fuck you values, and encouraged me to not allow my budding feminist ways to be bludgeoned by all the soul crushing weight of mainstream culture. I was lucky I was met at the door with things like the Bikini Kill demo, or Fugazi or the first Kill Rock Stars comp, or Babes in Toyland shows. I was met with polemics and respectful address. I was met with girl heroes in guitar squall, kicking out the jams under the stage lights. I was being hurtled towards deeper rewards, records and bands were triggering ideas and wrenching open doors of interminable hope and inspiration. I acknowledge the importance of all of that because I know I would not be who I am now, doing what I do, 12 years down the line, if I had not had gotten those fundamentals, been presented with those ideas about what music, or moreover, what life can be about.

And so I watch these girls at emo shows more than I ever do the band. I watch them sing along, see what parts they freak out over. I wonder if this does it for them, if seeing these bands, these dudes on stage resonates and inspires them to want to pick up a guitar or drum sticks. Or if they just see this as something dudes do, because there are no girls, there is no them up there. I wonder if they are being thwarted by the FACT that there is no presentation of girls as participants, but rather, only as consumers, or if we reference the songs directly, the consumed. I wonder if this is where music will begin and end for them. If they can be radicalized in spite of this. If being denied keys to the clubhouse or airtime will spur them into action.

I know that, for me, as an auto-didactic teenaged bitch, who thought her every idea was a good idea worthy of expression and audience, it did not truly occur to me to start a band until I saw other women playing music (Babes in Toyland, early 1990). Up until then, seeing Bloodline chugga-chugga it up 97 times on local hardcore bills had not done it for me. Dinosaur Jr’s hairwaving and soloing had not done it for me. The dozens of bands, bands who’s records I knew all the words to, who were comprised of 25-30 year old dudes, with nothing much to say, did not feel like punk rock with it’s arms open wide to me. It took seeing Bikini Kill in an illegal basement venue to truly throw the lights, to show me that there was more than one place, one role, for women to occupy, and that our participation was important and vital. It was YOU MATTER writ large.

I don’t want these front row girls to miss that. I don’t want girls leaving clubs denied of encouragement and potential, quietly vexed and clad in the burka of emo’s male dominance. Because as fucking lame as punk rock can be, as hollow as all of our self serving claims ring that punk rock’s culture is something TRULY DIFFERENT (sic) than median society at it’s gnarled foundations still exists the possibilities for connection, for exposure to radical notions, for punk rock to match up to the elaborate idea of what many kids dream, or hope for it to mean for all of that to absolutely and totally exist I believe much of that hinges on the continual presence of radicalized women within the leagues, and those women being encouraged, given reasons to stay, to want to belong, rather than punished or diminished by the music which glues the various fractious communities together.
Us girls deserve more than one song. We deserve more than one pledge of solidarity. We deserve better songs than any boy will ever write about us.
For all you TLDR people, here's a shortened version of that article: Emos are a bunch of self-pitying fucks who whine about not being able to get laid.

WarPhalange
9th September 06, 02:13 AM
For all you TLDR people, here's a shortened version of that article: Emos are a bunch of self-pitying fucks who whine about not being able to get laid.

tl;dr

Shawarma
9th September 06, 03:03 PM
Is Eminem emo? I think he is. After all, 99% of his songs are about how much he hates everything, especially women and his ex-wife, and how mean and nasty his mummy is.

WarPhalange
9th September 06, 03:30 PM
Eminemo.

ThaiBoxerShorts
9th September 06, 03:34 PM
Eminemo.
That sounds a lot like "I'm an emo" if you say it out loud.

Which, for some reason, amuses me.

Da_AzN
10th September 06, 10:37 AM
"There's a million of you just like me, who cuss like me, dont give a fuck like me, dress like me, walk talk and act like me..."



All his songs are all about himself

WarPhalange
10th September 06, 08:11 PM
Don't you know anything? White people only care about themselves!

Gosai
13th September 06, 09:20 AM
Indeed. I do only care about myself.

And on the subject of Emo...even Mother Theresa couldn't make herself care about those guys.

Tell ya what: Go to (insert country currently going through political turmoil and/or civil war here) for a few months, then come back and tell me how much life sucks.

Bluto Blutarsky
13th September 06, 10:26 AM
I hate country far far more than emo.

I seriously think that if deacon jim miller or wild bill walked into a "cowboy" bar today and heard so called "country" music he would kill them all on principle and the courts should consider it justifiable.

country music is an insult to the old west and western history.

WarPhalange
13th September 06, 12:35 PM
I saw an extended (very extended) commercial for a "greatest hits" country CD.

What did I learn? Country was the first "rap". Almost no instrumental music and some guy just talking. I was baffled.

JimmyTheHutt
13th September 06, 02:03 PM
"There's a million of you just like me, who cuss like me, dont give a fuck like me, dress like me, walk talk and act like me..."



All his songs are all about himself

It's made him rich, so he must be doing something right...
Wait, he's selling it to teenagers. Nevermind.

Veritas et Lux!
Jimmy The Hutt

JohnnyCache
17th September 06, 06:57 PM
Lets leave eminem out of this. He's not emo. He's too effectual to be emo.

ICY
17th September 06, 07:45 PM
No, he's emo...for a long time I described him as a whiny bitch, but emo is a better word for it.

manitobamantis
17th September 06, 07:49 PM
what the fuck is emo?

ThaiBoxerShorts
17th September 06, 08:21 PM
This the fuck is emo:

http://bieniosek.com/gallery/albums/album36/emo.sized.gif

WarPhalange
17th September 06, 09:14 PM
The definitive "Am I Emo?" test:

http://www.okcupid.com/tests/take

People who make up these tests should be disemboweled and force fed their intestines before they die.

Liffguard
18th September 06, 11:30 AM
Just curious, how much does emo sub-culture overlap with goth? I've met goths who were pretty cool all-told but also lots of people who I thought were goth at first but turned out to be utter whining pussies.

Teh El Macho
18th September 06, 12:12 PM
another follow up question:

Ok... so emo kids are white suburban who are among the most priviledged members of the human race... and still whine... completely detatched from reality... etc...

Are these legit reasons to whine?

a) dumped by girlfriend//boyfriend
b) never gotten laid or had a girlfriend//boyfriend
c) getting grounded for a week by the parents
d) having no friends
e) getting bullied in school
f) being a social outcast
g) shitty evil parents who have favoritism or are physically and/or verbally abusive, drunkards, adulterers, do not appreciate, etc...

On side note, people commit suicide for the following reasons I just said... :(Except for "g"... and sometimes "e", the others are just examples of self-correcting darwinism.

WarPhalange
18th September 06, 01:02 PM
Unless those are caused by a mental or physical problem (i.e. a penis on your forehead. A small one, at that) then they are something everybody who's ever moved to a new place has gone through at one point in life. Sorry, it's just not that big a deal.

AAAhmed46
18th September 06, 04:23 PM
....who was the 'first' emo in pop culture?

AAAhmed46
18th September 06, 05:08 PM
And how old is it?

ThaiBoxerShorts
18th September 06, 05:20 PM
And how old is it? I don't actually know, but your question gives me an idea: A retrospective look at emos throughout history. Profiles of famous historical figures explaining why they were emo.

For example, Abrahan Lincoln, who once wrote


I am now the most miserable man living. If what I feel were equally distributed to the whole human family, there would not be one cheerful face on the earth. Whether I shall ever be better I can not tell; I awfully forebode I shall not. To remain as I am is impossible; I must die or be better, it appears to me. would definitely make the cut.

If properly executed, the results could be hilarious.

AAAhmed46
18th September 06, 05:25 PM
I see see.

WarPhalange
18th September 06, 06:46 PM
Ozzy Osbourne. He has a fucking whiny voice.

Shawarma
19th September 06, 12:41 PM
Was Aleistair Crowley an emo or just a titanic faggot?

Neildo
19th September 06, 12:48 PM
Ozzy Osbourne. He has a fucking whiny voice.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g9mSAT7tX2Q

ICY
19th September 06, 01:22 PM
Did Lincoln whine and pout in public?

Gumby
25th September 06, 02:30 PM
Just curious, how much does emo sub-culture overlap with goth? I've met goths who were pretty cool all-told but also lots of people who I thought were goth at first but turned out to be utter whining pussies.

Goth and emo can overlap, but I think this is simply due to the style of dress of goth culture that causes you to stand out. Now, not only can you whine but you're going to get more people who stare at you and make fun of you, giving you more reason to whine.

That being said, I've got a lot of "goth" clothes in my wardrobe- lots of black pants and the boots with NIN shirts, H.I.M., Marilyn Manson, etc. I simply like the look and I've always kinda had a morbid personality. I like the way black feels on me =) No I dont paint my nails or wear makeup, and I have short blonde hair and blue eyes (so if the whole goth appearance falls through on me, my backup plan is Naziism). On the average, gothic people are much more quiet than the whiny emo kids.

I cant stand the emo kids just because they whine about a whole bunch of shit that nothing can be done about. Use it to do something creative. Some people will design clothes, do paintings, tattoo, etc. Emo kids dont want to do anything but bitch and complain. On top of that, I cant stand the skin tight jeans (anymore than the overly large wigger jeans)- this mostly applies to the guys, but since we're on the topic of wardrobes, I hate the metrosexual guy who's wearing a pink collar shirt. First I want to beat the wiggers with a brick, then the guy with the pink shirt, and somewhere down the line (after the Japanophile) you'll eventually find an emo.

Tef-the-Persian
25th September 06, 11:18 PM
I don't like the title of "emo" music, because I feel all music is and should be emotional. I don't understand emo music, I've tried to listen to it many times...just doesn't hit me. That's my only real complaint.

WarPhalange
25th September 06, 11:21 PM
If you can't understand Emo then you're just not a big enough pansie.

Tef-the-Persian
25th September 06, 11:28 PM
If you can't understand Emo then you're just not a big enough pansie.

Bright Eyes, for example, I can understand some of their stuff. I understand when the guy says, "Every day she awakes with a dream to describe/Something beautiful that wakes in her beautiful mind/I say, 'I'll trade you one, for two nightmares of mine'/I have some where I die/I have some where we all die."

It's the same spirit I get out of the Blues, but it's couched in a...it's communication out of vulnerability. I get the feeling he has no reason to be unhappy, and is just a miserable sot. Whereas good Bluesmen have a legitimacy that Bright Eyes lacks. It could be that I'm a terrible person, and that I have no basis to suspect weakness where there is honest pain. Pain that isn't self-pitying, but...

VikingPower
25th September 06, 11:38 PM
My new favorite picture.......

http://i10.tinypic.com/29lbofb.png

VikingPower
25th September 06, 11:42 PM
Was Aleistair Crowley an emo or just a titanic faggot?

He was just The Beast. He'd probably sacrifice emo kids.

Steve
25th September 06, 11:49 PM
What the hell is up with your avatar?

Out of control.

VikingPower
25th September 06, 11:51 PM
You can tell I'm bored, can't you?

I think Arnold smoking a doobie would be less NSWF than that one was.

Steve
25th September 06, 11:54 PM
You can tell I'm bored, can't you?

Yup.


I think Arnold smoking a doobie would be less NSWF than that one was.

Great movie, Pumping Iron. It's more fitting for you too (since you're an am strongman, I mean ;-p).

DAYoung
26th September 06, 02:20 AM
Did Lincoln whine and pout in public?

There was a brilliant article on Lincoln's depression in The Atlantic Monthly. Very interesting stuff - I recommmend it.

Steve
26th September 06, 02:26 AM
There was a brilliant article on Lincoln's depression in The Atlantic Monthly. Very interesting stuff - I recommmend it.

And this book, too.

Exploring Abraham Lincoln's 'Melancholy' (http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4976127)

Halfrican
26th September 06, 08:09 PM
The only good emo band was Rage Against the Machine.

Liffguard
27th September 06, 09:58 AM
Are RATM emo? No one can deny that Rage were aggressive and I thought that one of the main prerequisites for emo was basically passivity. Also, Rage were well aware of themes and ideas bigger than themselves whereas emo seems to be entirely self-centred.

AAAhmed46
27th September 06, 12:14 PM
Im with lifegaurd.

DAYoung
27th September 06, 01:25 PM
Are RATM emo? No one can deny that Rage were aggressive and I thought that one of the main prerequisites for emo was basically passivity. Also, Rage were well aware of themes and ideas bigger than themselves whereas emo seems to be entirely self-centred.

I agree. They're not emo, they're...you know...raging. The only machine emos are raging against is their ex-girlfriend's vibrator.

'Cruel stick, you wounded me,
to the quick, two size D
batteries inside
my bride
no flattery you see
Oh, woe, woe, woe is me.'

WarPhalange
27th September 06, 04:03 PM
I believe RATM is considered "nu metal" rap with "metal".

ThaiBoxerShorts
27th September 06, 04:09 PM
I would classify RATM as "crappy screamy angry white boy music."

WarPhalange
27th September 06, 04:24 PM
The growling/screaming he tried to do was really horrible. But they had some decent songs.

Halfrican
27th September 06, 07:54 PM
Are RATM emo? No one can deny that Rage were aggressive and I thought that one of the main prerequisites for emo was basically passivity. Also, Rage were well aware of themes and ideas bigger than themselves whereas emo seems to be entirely self-centred.

I guess I agree, I don't really know anything about Emo.

VikingPower
28th September 06, 06:35 PM
Oddly enough, we just had a lecture on radical criminology where Rage Against The Machine was brought up as a good example of it.

kungfujew
28th September 06, 08:13 PM
I agree. They're not emo, they're...you know...raging. The only machine emos are raging against is their ex-girlfriend's vibrator.

'Cruel stick, you wounded me,
to the quick, two size D
batteries inside
my bride
no flattery you see
Oh, woe, woe, woe is me.'

Hey now, don't mock a despair that you have not yet encountered.

DAYoung
28th September 06, 10:42 PM
Hey now, don't mock a despair that you have not yet encountered.

True. I have not yet lost love to a Rabbit.

'Danger, danger Will Robinson!'

selfcritical
8th October 06, 02:14 AM
Emo is bullshit because only in America could spoiled suburban teens who've never seen a day of hardship be that fucking self-centered as to think the petty shit in their lives is worth crying and being depressed over.


So, most emo music is pretty damn upbeat. Dashboard Confessional doesn't define the whole genre. The criticisms of the subculture are at least comprehensible, but most foaming about the music seems directed at something that flat up doesn't exist. As a general rule, the more "down" emo bands also tend to be the harder ones that mesh pretty well with the punk crowd. Cursive isa good example here.

selfcritical
8th October 06, 02:22 AM
Just curious, how much does emo sub-culture overlap with goth? I've met goths who were pretty cool all-told but also lots of people who I thought were goth at first but turned out to be utter whining pussies.


They pretty much don't.

Also, goth music really isn't very whiny either. It's actually kinda the whole other end of the spectrum, with lots of "I'm so dark and awesome" songs or "here's some stufff that's super-shocking, rawr". Which kinda makes sense because the main place where goth music is gonna get played is in goth dance clubs, so you kinda need to be able to dance to most of it.

Y'know.

Spookily.

Steve
8th October 06, 02:25 AM
So, most emo music is pretty damn upbeat. Dashboard Confessional doesn't define the whole genre. The criticisms of the subculture are at least comprehensible, but most foaming about the music seems directed at something that flat up doesn't exist. As a general rule, the more "down" emo bands also tend to be the harder ones that mesh pretty well with the punk crowd. Cursive isa good example here.

Who'd a thunk it:

... (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emo-punk)

Emo came from punk.

Toby Christensen
8th October 06, 02:28 AM
Because they feign disability and self harm themselves not out of any real illness, but for attention.

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
8th October 06, 08:22 AM
Who'd a thunk it:

... (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emo-punk)

Emo came from punk.

Yeah, all the people who got beat up at punk concerts ran away and started emo bands.

Steve
8th October 06, 08:33 AM
Yeah, all the people who got beat up at punk concerts ran away and started emo bands.

Figured you'd know the real dirt on that.

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
8th October 06, 08:39 AM
i'm punk as fuck

brb, need to find my jacket with band patches poorly sewn into it.

Steve
8th October 06, 08:43 AM
i'm punk as fuck

brb, need to find my jacket with band patches poorly sewn into it.

Don't forget the belt!

http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i141/forstevee/d3_2.jpg

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
8th October 06, 08:47 AM
Never had one of those.

I did have a recycled seat belt though. That was pretty sweet.

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
8th October 06, 08:48 AM
it kept me from being thrown clear of my pants.

Shawarma
8th October 06, 09:35 AM
Don't forget the belt!

http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i141/forstevee/d3_2.jpg
If I ever have kids, I want a belt like that. Imagine the respect they'll give you when a beating with that belt is an option.

WarPhalange
8th October 06, 12:14 PM
Just wear one of these:

http://www.wealddown.co.uk/images%20shop/4903LE%20axe.jpg

That will get you some respect.

Letum
2nd December 06, 06:36 PM
Because they're mindless pseudo intellectual attention whores. They're one of the things wrong with your country I dare say.

Also, I believe "Emo" started when people started mixing hardcore (the screamy shit, I'm told that back then, it was somewhat enjoyable) with punk influenced metal (Thrash) and alot of the Thrash guys would refer to it as "Emo"

Since then however, we've been getting what we now term Emo - Derrivitve music for tasteless attention whores.

The new stuff is to Emo, what Trivium is to Thrash.

Steve
2nd December 06, 08:39 PM
We cared a couple months ago.

Letum
2nd December 06, 09:16 PM
Son of a bitch, I have to start reading dates on these things.

ThaiBoxerShorts
2nd December 06, 10:09 PM
We cared a couple months ago.
No we didn't.

DAYoung
2nd December 06, 11:30 PM
No we didn't.

You did too. I distinctly remember you saying: 'You know, DAYoung, I really loved that thread about EMO.' Then you wept a little bit, and wiped your nose. 'In fact,' you said, sniffling in your handkerchief, 'I cared about that thread more than anything in the world.'

I thought it was quite touching.

WarPhalange
2nd December 06, 11:48 PM
Just because you love someone doesn't mean you have to care about her.

I mean... it.

DAYoung
3rd December 06, 12:17 AM
I realise your relationships to threads and women are similar (i.e. they mostly involve masturbation), but I'm not sure your insensitivity and callousness need to be made public (your callouses are bad enough).

Question!
3rd December 06, 12:19 AM
Since this thread has been brought back from the dead, I might as well add something.

Emo Assault Squadron (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LkDhh1pfG-4)(hope this isn't a repost)

ThaiBoxerShorts
3rd December 06, 12:23 AM
Ironic that a thread about emos would come back from the dead.

I'd expect such behavior from a thread about goths, however.

DAYoung
3rd December 06, 12:35 AM
You must spread some black eye-makeup around before giving it to ThaiBoxerShorts again.

Lendo
12th December 06, 12:22 PM
Also, I believe "Emo" started when people started mixing hardcore (the screamy shit, I'm told that back then, it was somewhat enjoyable) with punk influenced metal (Thrash) and alot of the Thrash guys would refer to it as "Emo"


Actually, the term was coined by people talking about a few bands from DC between 84-86, Rites Of Spring and Embrace in particular (members of DCHC bands Minor Threat, Deadline, Faith, SOA, etc.), the folks in those bands thought it was stupid then, anyone who would willfully call themselves that are still stupid.

Evil Betty
20th January 07, 11:48 AM
Every emo kid I've ever met is a whiney, bitchy little shit who does nothing and expects to get everything, including getting laid by hot women. Fuck emo.

Musically, is there any need for discussion? Some people hate rap. Some people hate metal. Some people hate jazz. EVERYONE should hate EMO!

Rhamma
20th January 07, 02:09 PM
Because he is annoying!

http://www.bullshido.net/gallery/data/500/Tv_weird_al_emo_philips.jpg

Ryan Platts
19th May 08, 03:47 AM
God damn. I started buying jeans a few months ago (didn't really like them until then... still not crazy about them)

I try on a normal pair. FUCK!! I can't breathe. I look to see if maybe someone stuck a small size or whatever. No. They are supposed to be like that. Only the super loose kind fit me. Anything else is just infinite pain. And I'm not even trying to brag or anything. I'm white.

So I can't understand how Emers wear girl jeans. =/

Yeah, it's funny how thrash metal guys in the 80's wore tight jeans a lot, but it actually looked really fucking cool, because they had long hair, band shirts and leather jackets. Emos fail not because they wear tight jeans but because said jeans are cut in a woman's style and are combined with things that look shit (such as the drippy-looking t shirts and the fringe).

Instead of looking like an emo, I'd prefer to look like Abbath form Immortal :)


@ Evil Betty: Black Metal Ist Krieg!!! Varg doesn't care anymore, but Dead and Euronymous dissaprove of you from the grave!!!! :)

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
19th May 08, 04:01 AM
This thread is a year old. Metal "fashion" looked terrible. Enjoy being old and out of touch.

Ryan Platts
19th May 08, 10:11 AM
This thread is a year old. Metal "fashion" looked terrible. Enjoy being old and out of touch.

I'm 17 for your information, and I don't much care for your opinions on fashion, or on anything for that matter.

Yes I realise this is an exceedingly old thread. What can I say, I have a habit of forgetting to check the age of threads and posts. Suppose that's the downside of having a life outside the internet.

Madgrenade
19th May 08, 11:57 AM
EMO killed Reading. They must all be destroyed/fags.

Zendetta
19th May 08, 12:00 PM
Emo is the fulfillment of the stereotype that White People have No Soul.

socratic
21st May 08, 06:39 AM
Emo is the fulfillment of the stereotype that White People have No Soul.

I think it's more the 'white people are pussies, can't dress, and can't dance' stereotype, personally. Emos can't do any of the above and are, as everyone is aware, notorious pussies.

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
21st May 08, 07:06 AM
I don't much care for your opinions on fashion,

Yes, because this is a more attractive style than emo:
http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t67/BullshidoTrail/image007.jpg
Do you wear New Balance shoes?

Ryan Platts
21st May 08, 07:50 AM
Yes, because this is a more attractive style than emo:
http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t67/BullshidoTrail/image007.jpg
Do you wear New Balance shoes?

Actually, yes, yes it is. And no, I don't wear new balance shoes.

Is that Morbid Saint or am I confusing them with someone else?

MEGA JESUS-SAMA
21st May 08, 08:04 AM
Thanks. You not realizing why they look terrible was the punchline and you played right along with it. For a second there I thought you wouldn't be able to keep a straight face!

Ryan Platts
21st May 08, 09:05 AM
Thanks. You not realizing why they look terrible was the punchline and you played right along with it. For a second there I thought you wouldn't be able to keep a straight face!

Okay, whatever you say, we obviously have vastly different tastes.

And yeah, that is Morbid Saint. Great band, their "Spectrum of Death" LP is incredibly hard to find now, great brutal thrash verging on death metal. Not that you care very much :)

Thinkchair
31st May 08, 12:56 AM
I may be very out of touch, but I still do not grasp what emo is exactly. It seems like such an "in-between" style to me.

Ryan Platts
31st May 08, 04:58 AM
I may be very out of touch, but I still do not grasp what emo is exactly. It seems like such an "in-between" style to me.

Basically, it hasn't had a music scene or style of its own since the mid 90s as far as I know, so instead it's just leeched on to already shitty pop-punk and "metal"-core bands. As such, it's more of a fashion and "ideology"/mindset (basically involving moping around like a dickhead and trying to convince yourself that your privileged middle-upper class life is unbearable) than a genuine style or movement, as this would seem to necessitate more of a balance between music, dress, and outlook.

That probably didn't help at all, so I apologise in advance!!

Zendetta
1st June 08, 05:26 AM
I may be very out of touch, but I still do not grasp what emo is exactly. It seems like such an "in-between" style to me.

You are correct: Emo is in-between "Fag" and "Douchebag."

Shawarma
1st June 08, 07:25 AM
Do Emos rank above or below Goths and neo-punks?

Madgrenade
1st June 08, 08:11 AM
No. They rank between roadkill and smegma.

Cullion
1st June 08, 08:39 AM
I don't really understand Emo. I'm too old to get it. Links to Emo bands on youtube please.

Madgrenade
1st June 08, 09:15 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BNMEQu0Uhxw&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q6o_KY-NdIw&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XKRIkO0wbVA&feature=related

Forgive me.

Ryan Platts
1st June 08, 09:20 AM
I don't really understand Emo. I'm too old to get it. Links to Emo bands on youtube please.

That's the problem, the bands that could be considered genuine emo were gone last decade. You can't really say that any band is genuinely "emo" anymore, because as I said they all latch on to equally shite pop-punk and metalcore bands (for example, My Chemical Romance, Hawthorne Heights, Bring Me The Horizon, a whole host of godawful metalcore bands).

But apparently genuine emo, which was an offshoot of American hardcore punk, wasn't too bad. Bands such as Rites Of Spring are in this category (other bands escape me at this point in time).

And, for the record, I'm 17 and I don't understand it either- I think that people with their head screwed on straight aren't meant to.....

Madgrenade
1st June 08, 09:37 AM
^^^^^^ Typical emo kid.

Kein Haar
1st June 08, 10:02 AM
Da_azn poses a valid question.

I digress, but maybe MJS can take him by the hand teach him how to comfortable in his skin, as an asian, in this crazy mixed-up world.

Cullion
1st June 08, 10:16 AM
The acoustic was sort of alright in that first vid, vaguely punk, but the lyrics were too self-pitying and too loosely sung for my taste.

The second video was just shit.

The last vid had some ok jailbait but the backing music was sort of shitty pop-punk.

My mind's made up, if my children get into that, I'm going to build a dungeon to protect them from the outside world of drugs and faggotry.

Cullion
1st June 08, 10:17 AM
Are Placebo an Emo band? they're a bit old, but it seems like a kind of template for this later stuff.

kungfujew
1st June 08, 12:13 PM
Are Placebo an Emo band? they're a bit old, but it seems like a kind of template for this later stuff.

Their sound would appear emo to today's listeners, but their lyrics were too awesome.