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Bolverk
28th March 03, 01:16 PM
'Human Shield' Wannabe Admits: 'I Was Wrong'
Ken Joseph Jr.
NewsMax.com Wires
Friday, March 28, 2003

Also see: "Reality Stuns 'Human Shield': 'Saddam Was a Monster'" and "Disillusioned Human Shields."

AMMAN, Jordan I was wrong. I had opposed the war on Iraq in my radio program, on television and in my regular columns, and I participated in demonstrations against it in Japan. But a visit to relatives in Baghdad radically changed my mind.

I am an Assyrian Christian, born and raised in Japan, where my father had moved after World War II to help rebuild the country. He was a Protestant minister, and so am I.

As an Assyrian I was told the story of our people from a young age: how my grandparents had escaped the great Assyrian Holocaust in 1917 and settled finally in Chicago.

There are about 6 million Assyrians now, about 2.5 million in Iraq and the rest scattered across the world. Without a country and rights even in our native land, it has been the prayer of generations that the Assyrian nation will one day be restored.

A few weeks ago, I traveled to Iraq with supplies for our church and family. This was my first visit ever to the land of my forefathers. The first order of business was to attend church. During a simple meal for peace activists after the service, an older man sounded me out carefully.

Iraqi: 'We Want the War'

Finally he felt free to talk: "There is something you should know - we didn't want to be here tonight. When the priest asked us to gather for a peace service, we said we didn't want to come because we don't want peace. We want the war to come."

"What in the world are you talking about?" I blurted.

Thus began a strange odyssey that shattered my convictions. At the same time, it gave me hope for my people and, in fact, hope for the world.

Because of my invitation as a "religious person" and family connections, I was spared the government snoops who ordinarily tail foreigners 24 hours a day.

This allowed me to see and hear amazing things as I stayed in the homes of several relatives. The head of our tribe urged me not to remain with my people during its time of trial but instead go out and tell the world about the nightmare ordinary Iraqis are going through.

'We Live Like Animals'

I was to tell the world about the terror on the faces of my family when a stranger knocked at the door. "Look at our lives!" they said. "We live like animals: no food, no car, no telephone, no job, and, most of all, no hope."

That's why they wanted this war.

"You cannot imagine what it is to live like this for 20, 30 years. We have to keep up our routine lest we would lose our minds."

But I realized in every household that someone had already lost his or her mind; in other societies such a person would be in a mental hospital. I also realized that there wasn't a household that did not mourn at least one family member who had become a victim of this police state.

I wept with relatives whose son just screamed all day long. I cried with a relative who had lost his wife. Yet another left home every day for a "job" where he had nothing to do. Still another had lost a son to war and a husband to alcoholism.

As I observed the slow death of a people without hope, Saddam Hussein seemed omnipresent. There were his statues; posters showed him with his hand outstretched or firing his rifle, or wearing an Arab headdress. These images seemed to be on every wall, in the middle of the road, in homes.

"Everything will be all right when the war is over," people told me. "No matter how bad it is, we will not all die. Twelve years ago, it went almost all the way but failed. We cannot wait anymore. We want the war, and we want it now."

The People Don't Want the U.N.

When I told members of my family that some sort of compromise with Iraq was being worked out at the United Nations, they reacted not with joy but anger: "Only war will get out of our present condition."

This reminded me of the stories I heard from older Japanese who had welcomed the sight of American B-29 bombers in the skies over their country as a sign that the war was coming to an end. True, these planes brought destruction, but also hope.

'I Felt Terrible About Having Demonstrated Against the War'

I felt terrible about having demonstrated against the war without bothering to ask what the Iraqis wanted. Tears streamed down my face as I lay in my bed in a tiny Baghdad house crowded in with 10 other people of my own flesh and blood, all exhausted, all without hope. I thought, "How dare I claim to speak for people I had not even asked what they wanted?"

Then I began a strange journey to let the world know of the true situation in Iraq, just as my tribe had begged me to. With great risk to myself and those who had told their stories and allowed my camera into their homes, I videotaped their plight.

But would I get that tape out of the country?

To make sure I was not simply getting the feelings of the oppressed Assyrian minority, I spoke to dozens of other people, all terrified. Over and over they told me, "We would be killed for speaking like this." Yet they did speak, though only in private homes or when other Iraqis had assured them that no government minder was watching over me.

I spoke with a former army member, with someone working for the police, with taxi drivers, store owners, mothers and government officials. All had the same message: "Please bring on the war. We may lose our lives, but for our children's sake, please, please end our misery."

'Soldiers Hated Their Work'

On my last day in Baghdad, I saw soldiers putting up sandbags. By their body language, these men made it clear that they dared not speak but hated their work; they were unmistakably on the side of the common people.

I wondered how my relatives felt about the United States and Britain. Their feelings were mixed. They have no love for the allies -- but they trust them.

"We are not afraid of the American bombing. They will bomb carefully and not purposely target the people," I was told. "What we are afraid of is Saddam and the Baath Party will do when the war begins."

The final call for help came at the most unexpected place - the border, where crying members of my family sent me off.

The taxi fares from Baghdad to Amman had risen within one day from $100 to $300, to $500 and then to $1,000 by nightfall.

My driver looked on anxiously as a border guard patted me down. He found my videotapes, and I thought: It's all over!

For once I experienced what my relatives were going through 365 days a year - sheer terror. Quietly, the officer laid the tapes on a desk, one by one. Then he looked at me - was it with sadness or with anger? Who knows?

He clinically shook his head and without a word handed all the tapes back to me. He didn't have to say anything. He spoke the only language left to these imprisoned Iraqis, the silent language of human kindness.

"Please take these tapes and show them to the world," was his silent message. "Please help us ... and hurry!" The Rev. Ken Joseph Jr. lives in Tokyo and directs Assyrianchristians.com.

Copyright 2003 by United Press International.

All rights reserved.


Knowing it is not enough, we must apply.
Willing is not enough, we must do.

Justme
28th March 03, 01:25 PM
Wow.

The Wastrel
28th March 03, 01:35 PM
The Bush administration has great responsibility to meet now.

**The most miraculous power that can verifiably be attributed to "chi" is its ability to be all things to virtually all people, depending on what version of the superstition they are attempting to defend at any given moment.**

Osiris
28th March 03, 01:38 PM
Its not i question that Saddam is evil. What is in question (ti me) is if saving the Iraqi people is worth the price that we will pay. The Iraqis are capable of saving themselves. Saddams people are a minority of the population. Yes, chemical weapons are a bitch, but Saddam would lose. Why should we help them? And why them of all people? The US is not in the business of saving people for no reason. Thats merely a side affect. The real reasons behind the war are not as noble. This war may or may not be good in the short run, but in the long run it'll turn the middle east into Africa. Foreign powers will come in, rape them silly, bust a nut and leave. Since they will be the only thing holding the place together, it will fall apart shortly after.

"A well set table, 'Third Rock From The Sun'
Dead men hung, 'Caddilacs and dinosaurs'
hot peanuts and fireworks, a Holocaust" - Warcloud

Justme
28th March 03, 01:51 PM
"What is in question (ti me) is if saving the Iraqi people is worth the price that we will pay"

I hope so. We are paying a terrible price.

"Why should we help them? "

Because they need it. I would want us to help anyone who is suffering like they are. Even in our own country. I personally do what I can. I give to the mission. I contribute to local charities. Most important of all. I am trying to raise my daughter and son to be good honorable citizens.

Ya know, hate Bush or not. I thought when he said today or yesterday " It is up to the Iragi people to determine their future government not outsiders" that was great. I believe we are trying to free them.

Os. Did you here rumors that Alqieda (how ever its spelled) are fighting with the Iragi's. I wonder if its true.

Bolverk
28th March 03, 01:58 PM
I beleive it is the responsibility of Honorable Nations to help remove rulers who are of the same ilk as Saddam. However, I also believe that we should do our best not to destroy civilian areas, farming areas, water supplies, and it is really important to minimize civilian deaths.

If we are there to be liberators, then we need to make sure that the people will have a viable life to live when this conflict is over and peace is once again restored.

Sincerely,

Knowing it is not enough, we must apply.
Willing is not enough, we must do.

Osiris
28th March 03, 02:06 PM
"We are paying a terrible price."

No were not. Not yet. People die in wars. Get used to it. This is what you wanted. You thpught that Saddam would just surrender?

"Because they need it. I would want us to help anyone who is suffering like they are. Even in our own country."

We should help them because they need help? They can help themselves. If we continue in this fashion, WE'LL need help.


"A well set table, 'Third Rock From The Sun'
Dead men hung, 'Caddilacs and dinosaurs'
hot peanuts and fireworks, a Holocaust" - Warcloud

Justme
28th March 03, 02:13 PM
"This is what you wanted. You thpught that Saddam would just surrender?"

It is never what I wanted. It is what came with the package. Also, being a VETERAN and an infantryman, I never thought it would be easy.


Also, from the stories I am hearing, they hardly could help themselves. They are living without hope, at the point of a gun.

Os, are you having a bad day!

Osiris
28th March 03, 02:16 PM
"Os, are you having a bad day!"

Nah. Gettingb annoyed though. Im going to bow outm for while.

"A well set table, 'Third Rock From The Sun'
Dead men hung, 'Caddilacs and dinosaurs'
hot peanuts and fireworks, a Holocaust" - Warcloud

Justme
28th March 03, 02:17 PM
Stay well.

Boyd
29th March 03, 01:17 AM
Hey guys, has it ever occured to anyone here that the Iraqi people are not just one giant collective body of people that share the exact same views on the war? God, I'm really getting sick of people posting anecdotal stories and then saying "See? SEE? The Iraqis really do love/hate America! Just look at this parade/riot they threw when the Americans rescued/invaded them!"

I'm not against the war on some bullshit moral grounds, I'm against the fact that we don't have a fucking clue as to what we're going to do once we win. In the past week I've read about a dozen (mostly contradictory) news reports on plans for post-war Iraq, running the gamut from naive ("Once we take out Saddam, democracy will just suddenly materialize in the Middle East. Because I guess no one's thought of it before.") to half-assed ("We'll figure something out after we win") to just plain irresponsible ("Ehh, we'll just hand the country over to some tribal leader. They'll be fine."). Now, I may very well be wrong here. It's possible that I missed Bush's plan for a postwar Iraq amidst all the montages of shit getting blowed up real good and experts speculating that the man who looks, acts, talks, and sounds like Saddam Hussein is actually a robot clone. But the problem is, if Bush does have a plan, he sure as hell must not have any confidence in it. Otherwise, it'd be better-known.

Fact: Many Iraqis will be happy when Saddam Hussein leaves office. Fact: Many Iraqis will be unhappy if the U.S. doesn't clean up its mess and an even worse dictator comes by. Fact: Many Iraqis will be unhappy if the U.S. DOES stick around to clean up its mess. Fact: You can't please everybody, but in the Middle East, not pleasing everybody often results in people getting super-pissed and blowing other people up. This is a powderkeg, folks, and I can't believe how many people are just glossing over the most significant part of the war with glittering pleasantries such as "liberating an oppressed people" and "our duty to the world" and "removing the terrorist threat".

They don't call it the Nazi PARTY for nothing!

The Wastrel
29th March 03, 02:04 AM
Thank you Boyd.

**The most miraculous power that can verifiably be attributed to "chi" is its ability to be all things to virtually all people, depending on what version of the superstition they are attempting to defend at any given moment.**

Osiris
29th March 03, 02:37 AM
"Fact: You can't please everybody, but in the Middle East, not pleasing everybody often results in people getting super-pissed and blowing other people up. This is a powderkeg, folks, and I can't believe how many people are just glossing over the most significant part of the war with glittering pleasantries such as "liberating an oppressed people" and "our duty to the world" and "removing the terrorist threat"."

Thank you.

"A well set table, 'Third Rock From The Sun'
Dead men hung, 'Caddilacs and dinosaurs'
hot peanuts and fireworks, a Holocaust" - Warcloud

elipson
29th March 03, 03:47 AM
Well said Boyd.

"An eye for an eye leaves the whole world blind"
-Ghandi

9chambers
29th March 03, 06:05 AM
On December 12, 2002, the Washington Post reported credible intelligence indicated that Iraq had delivered the highly lethal chemical nerve agent VX to an Al Qaida cell in Lebanon, presenting the U.S. and our allies with an unprecedented, ominous threat.

---

"We have solid reporting of senior level contacts between Iraq and Al Qaida going back a decade. Credible information indicates that Iraq and Al Qaida have discussed safe haven and reciprocal non-aggression. We have solid evidence of the presence in Iraq of Al Qaida members, including some who have been in Baghdad. We have credible reporting that Al Qaida leaders sought contacts in Iraq who could help them acquire WMD capabilities. The reporting also stated that Iraq has provided training to Al Qaida members in the areas of poisons and gases and making conventional bombs. Iraq's increased support to extremist Palestinians, coupled with growing indications of a relationship with Al Qaida, suggest that Baghdad's links to terrorists will increase, even absent U.S. military action."

http://216.26.163.62/2003/guest_holton_2_06.html

Osiris
29th March 03, 02:28 PM
Any other sources?

"A well set table, 'Third Rock From The Sun'
Dead men hung, 'Caddilacs and dinosaurs'
hot peanuts and fireworks, a Holocaust" - Warcloud